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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 341

post #5101 of 5807
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post
 
 

One treat of the year we spent looking at houses was seeing old workshops guys had cobbled together. Reminded me of my dad's.  I wonder how many guys ages 20-50 would want a workshop.  I would, but I wouldn't use it nearly as much as my dad's generation did.  

I probably am a member of your dads generation.The reason  mentioned a shop,I've really been just too lazy to build one , I have been working out of three different areas and it would be great to have consolidated space

This is in the computer room and dedicated to sewing and small bench work

 

This is cobbled onto the end of a detached garage which I converted into an apartment my kids used as they got older. I use it for dirtier bench work like mounting and maintaining skis ,surfboard repairs ,building bikes and working on cars

 

 

This one is on the side of my house for large wood projects and I can set up my large saws 


See what I mean . Sorry for the crappy photos I cracked the lens on my I phone

post #5102 of 5807
Christ what a self-sufficient menz! Well done.
post #5103 of 5807
I would love to have a workshop. I've been watching this guy's videos, and his is dreamy:

https://www.youtube.com/user/urbanTrash

And specifically about building and outfitting his shop:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3086A7F3C5F0A1D3
post #5104 of 5807
I like!
post #5105 of 5807
Great videos , uninspiring woodworking results. One should never go 'full retard'.
post #5106 of 5807
What specifically did you not like? A lot of his projects are segmented wood turnings, which I think are mostly done to impress other woodworkers. It's not a look I generally like but it sure is hard and time consuming to do it well!
post #5107 of 5807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

What specifically did you not like? A lot of his projects are segmented wood turnings, which I think are mostly done to impress other woodworkers. It's not a look I generally like but it sure is hard and time consuming to do it well!

Considering that his workshop set up is very industrial-pro with minimal handwork, I expected him to produce architectural elements, custom furniture; something of that nature. Instead he seem to take time to make useless spheres and cups that look like shit from Etsy and he makes them using autocad and industrial machinery....I see no point in any of this other than his own enjoyment, that is why I said uninspiring.
post #5108 of 5807
I don't think you appreciate the extent to which those those things are actually produced "by hand." Yes, "industrial" machines (I guess this means power tools...) do the physical labor, but they don't do the design, measurements, careful cutting and laborious fitting, the final shaping, or the tedious and delicate finishing. It's much, much harder than you might imagine to assemble something from hundreds or thousands of tiny pieces of wood and have it come out looking anything like the things he makes. The videos might be 10 minutes long, but the projects probably take 50 or more hours of work each.
post #5109 of 5807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I don't think you appreciate the extent to which those those things are actually produced "by hand." Yes, "industrial" machines (I guess this means power tools...) do the physical labor, but they don't do the design, measurements, careful cutting and laborious fitting, the final shaping, or the tedious and delicate finishing. It's much, much harder than you might imagine to assemble something from hundreds or thousands of tiny pieces of wood and have it come out looking anything like the things he makes. The videos might be 10 minutes long, but the projects probably take 50 or more hours of work each.

 

It is best just to ignore, rather than feed, the troll.


Edited by brokencycle - 9/19/16 at 12:52pm
post #5110 of 5807
I've done quite a bit of woodturning myself (though I've never made any segmented stuff), so any excuse to talk about it is welcome.
post #5111 of 5807
The shop is wonderful but it's certainly not industrial equipment on today's scale. Industrial equipment would be like....giant Martin jointers, huge belt sanding thicknessers, giant thickness planers, slider table saws, CNC lathes, big shapers with power feeders, ect.....most of which is far out of the reach of hobby-scale projects and shops.
post #5112 of 5807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I don't think you appreciate the extent to which those those things are actually produced "by hand." Yes, "industrial" machines (I guess this means power tools...) do the physical labor, but they don't do the design, measurements, careful cutting and laborious fitting, the final shaping, or the tedious and delicate finishing. It's much, much harder than you might imagine to assemble something from hundreds or thousands of tiny pieces of wood and have it come out looking anything like the things he makes. The videos might be 10 minutes long, but the projects probably take 50 or more hours of work each.

Did not he has CNC or whatever you call computer controlled machines in the video? His shop is over and above what most hobbists or professionals could afford . That is why I am calling his shop industrial/pro set up - in a context, of course, of a woodworking shop in your backyard. I am not saying what he does is easy, I an saying it is ugly and useless. That is just my opinion. I see huge industrial looking woodshop with tons of expensive equipment and huge potential to produce all sorts of wonderful things that produces useless, ugly crap.
His videos are great though.
post #5113 of 5807
Woodworking isn't a poor man's hobby, to be sure, but his shop isn't that extravagant. Many of the machines he has are older, probably scavenged and refurbished over a lifetime. Half of them would have been scrap by now if he hadn't picked them up. He has a lot of tools, including multiples of some expensive machines, but they're probably set up for different purposes (machine setup takes a long time and switching back and forth takes forever). The shop is a nice building, but it wouldn't cost that much to build. The CNC -- he probably uses it to cut out inlays. There's no way he's using to form the bowls or to cut the segments the bowls are glued up from (those are cut with a table saw and fitted using a disc sander). The complete pieces are turned on a lathe (and he does have a nice one, one that cost about $7k IIRC).

And, like I said, many of the segmented turnings he's made aren't to my taste. But he mostly seems to be making videos, which are pretty good (at least the couple I've seen) and very popular. Even if you don't like the stuff he makes, you have to respect the fact that tens or hundreds of thousands of people wanted to watch him do it.
post #5114 of 5807
I agree with everything you wrote , save for the last sentence.
post #5115 of 5807
I'm so-so on what he chooses to make, but I like the process. And his filmmaking is very enjoyable, especially the stop-motion stuff.
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