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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 320

post #4786 of 5761
thanks for the feedback guys - going to just stay away from it. not something that is needed and sounds like more hassle
post #4787 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mujib View Post

Didn't want to start a new thread for this.

We're moving into a condo next week. The owner has asked me to help him find painters, and since I want the popcorn ceilings to be removed from the two bedrooms, he wants me to pay part of the cost. How much does this kind of work cost?

The glossy paint on the doors and stairs has thicker areas (clots?) that seem to have been painted over several times. How can these be removed? What should I tell or expect from the painters?

There are baseboards and moulding throughout. Must these be painted a glossier finish? Must the kitchen and bathrooms be painted a glossier finish, or would eggshell be fine?

I am not a fan of textured walls, but I've heard that some texture is necessary. I am mainly concerned with the walls in the living room; they have some texture though not too much. Should I have the painters apply a skim coat or would a particular finish make the slight bit of texture unnoticeable?

One of the walls in the living room is a vertical wood plank wall (not sure what this is called). Should I have it painted the same finish as the other walls?

The doors and door frames seem to be typical apartment style/quality. Can anything make these look better?

Thanks!

Are you renting? All those things are fairly reasonable for a new owner to fix, but asking a landlord to apply a skip coat to smooth out the walls seems like a recipe to be told to get fucked. I know I would.

Anyway, glossy is not necessary.
The paint globs/drips are from fast/shoddy work, and can be fixed but again, it would add a lot of extra labor and I would expect that the land lord would ask you to pay.

Can't tell you to paint the wall without seeing it. Live with the doors and window trim.
post #4788 of 5761
M.

I agree that that looks like rot. Did you purchase w/o a pest inspection?
post #4789 of 5761

Yep.  We had a general inspection, but no pest one.  Bought it off market from a neighbor and agreed to take it as is.  His mother had recently died and it was the house he grew up in.  We figured there'd be some dry rot, which, afaik, is caused by fungus.  It's pretty ubiquitous in the the western part of the city.   We bid on several houses in the past year and looked at the disclosure packages for many more.  Very few had pest inspections.  I thought that was weird, but I guess it's such a seller's market that people don't care.  Our agent told us we should just assume we'll need to treat our house and budget 10-15,000 for it.  

 

Wiring for the bathroom's done.

 

 

For the right wall, the plan was to reframe the whole thing to provide enough depth for a regular medicine cabinet and recessed tile TP holder.  But the contractor said removing the old 2x2s would have disturbed the lath and plaster too much, so he screwed new 2x2s to the old ones instead:

 

 

Another shot of the ceiling.  See the pipe sticking out?  Our contractor says that's for a old carbide lighting system.  Those pipes stick out of pretty much all the light fixtures in the house.  Looks like we'll be rewiring the whole house, and I believe the pipes will be removed. 

 

post #4790 of 5761

Sorry, but stupid question #42:  

 

For the shower/tub, do we install a tile soap dish, corner shelves, and/or a tile alcove.  I kind of like the old-fashioned look of soap dishes.  The tile guy recommended corner shelves.  Most modern baths seem to have alcoves.  Corner shelves may be the most practical. If we go with them, I'm thinking they'll be even w/ the tile wainscoting, which is going to about 50" so the top rail can clear the electrical boxes.

post #4791 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Are you renting? All those things are fairly reasonable for a new owner to fix, but asking a landlord to apply a skip coat to smooth out the walls seems like a recipe to be told to get fucked. I know I would.

Anyway, glossy is not necessary.
The paint globs/drips are from fast/shoddy work, and can be fixed but again, it would add a lot of extra labor and I would expect that the land lord would ask you to pay.

Can't tell you to paint the wall without seeing it. Live with the doors and window trim.

Thanks for the response. Yeah, I'm renting. I've agreed to pay for some things.

So nothing in a glossier finish?

The walls have to be painted; they're a "cappuccino" color now.
post #4792 of 5761

The landlord pays to fix a rental property not the new renters unless he decides to deduct what you fix from rent.  Plus he can deduct those expenses on his taxes.

 

@emptym - I like recessed alcoves.  Currently we have a tile soap dish with wash rag holder but the bar soap just slides right out of the dish.  I think this is more due to the shape of the Dove brand soap as a rectangular bar may stay in there.  Also my wife has a ton of bottles for who the hell knows so an alcove would help instead of them falling off every corner of our tub.

post #4793 of 5761
Eh... If you are unwilling to accept the apartment as is, and other renters are fine with it, then it is not unreasonable for a landlord to expect you to pay for some or all of the cost.
post #4794 of 5761
Particularly as these aren't necessarily "repairs" but rather personal preference.

If you're renting a place, don't pay for an improvement (i.e. Removing the popcorn ceiling). Just live with it and bank the cash instead of improving someone else's property.
post #4795 of 5761
We have alcoves in all our showers. When Gracie first moved in we kept her for a few nights in one of the spare bedrooms (my music room) so she could get used to her new home. Here she is modelling a soap alcove:

post #4796 of 5761

Replacing the vinyl floor in my kitchen.  Had a contractor today who recommended against ceramic and instead going with a wood-look vinyl.  He said they are doing a lot of removals of ceramic for the stuff because the ceramic is so much harder and causes discomfort.  I'm not sure - I feel silly replacing vinyl with a newer vinyl product.  Also, it butts against a the original 50s oak floor, but with enough contrast I think it will be fine.

Thoughts?  His reasoning is neither will make much difference in the house value, so might as well go less expensive.  (Hopefully we will be moving within a year)

post #4797 of 5761
I don't know if there is enough hardness different to cause noticable discomfort...but ceramic is definitely going to cause anything you drop on it to shatter, while vinyl gives it a chance.

Doesn't have to be wood-look though.
post #4798 of 5761

If replacing vinyl with something else will not improve the value then stick with the vinyl.  I don't think I would go with a wood look myself though.

post #4799 of 5761
I can't stand wood look. I'm not convinced that vinyl will save anything, I have it on my main floor and it hasn't saved anything from breaking. Unfortunately my woodworking causes me tired hands and do I've let go of more than my fair share of coffee cups and tumblers.
post #4800 of 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
 

If replacing vinyl with something else will not improve the value then stick with the vinyl.  I don't think I would go with a wood look myself though.

 

The current vinyl is awful: it is showing its age, and it probably didn't look good to begin with.  I don't really like fake anything.  I just found it shocking to hear that installing the tile (I already bought it) is basically a cost.  I currently have quartz countertops and am putting in a subway tile backsplash, so it just seems out of place to leave it, I think.  Maybe I'm wrong and I'm wasting money though.

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