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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 317

post #4741 of 5754

Thanks guys.  Glad to hear you think he does good work.  He's supposed to be totally honest and a perfectionist, but the price of things has been a little shocking. 

post #4742 of 5754

I say that every time I check out at the grocery store

ps: I worked over 30 years in construction and from what I have seen I would say his work is excellent

post #4743 of 5754
Do any of you guys know how to deal with grass that's having trouble in the sun? There's a section of my yard that gets direct sunlight during the hottest part of the day, and it's really spotty. We're in a drought, so I thought that might be the problem, but my neighbor mentioned the other day that the prior owner had the same issue. He also said something about how the last guy used (what he thought was) sand to bring it back, and it worked. Any guesses as to what that approach might have been, or other ideas on how to manage it?

The grass is Bermuda, if that matters.
post #4744 of 5754
Bermuda is the most sun-loving grass there is. You need more water or fertilizer. If you're getting enough of those, it might be a disease.

ETA: bermuda is also very drought sensitive and has high water requirements. That's almost certainly your problem.
post #4745 of 5754

I have an area of Bermuda that I brought back from a weed patch. Since I live in California I have to keep it with grey water from the shower but it does great with that . All the yellow patches are from my dogs(2). No fertilizer in my case fwiw

post #4746 of 5754
It's resilient, for sure. There are several large planters (like 500+ square foot) in front of one of the courthouses here. During the drought last year they let the planters completely dry up and it killed every plant in them. This year the bermuda has regrown from seed and filled them back up.
post #4747 of 5754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

It's resilient, for sure. There are several large planters (like 500+ square foot) in front of one of the courthouses here. During the drought last year they let the planters completely dry up and it killed every plant in them. This year the bermuda has regrown from seed and filled them back up.


Does it go dormant in the winter like it does here

post #4748 of 5754
Yeah. It's not like St. Augustine that stays green all winter if the conditions are right.

But bermuda comes back earlier and stronger than most other grasses. Every year despite my best efforts and liberal application of poisons, patches of bermuda overrun my centipede until June or so.
post #4749 of 5754

@MrG, my guess is that it was some sort of granular fertilizer.

 

Today our contractor showed me how he's securing the plywood planks in the bathroom floor:  Using 3.75" exterior SDS screws, he attached 2x4s to both sides of the joists.  The plywood will be screwed down to the 2x4s, so there'll be no squeaking.  He brought that up w/o my mentioning it.

 

The ceilings look like cloudy skies now.  The blue is primer and the white is drywall mud.  After priming, he used a UV light to find any depressions, which he then went over with the mud.  Also, he told me he taped all the corners before the first skim coat and that primer. 

 

Now for a surprise with the plumbing.  The pipes run along the exterior wall, which is common for these old SF houses.  Ours were severely rusted.

 

He found out because when they started to attach the rough-in for the tub, they found that the pipe was crumbled and had been held together with some kind of putty and tape. 

 

And that pipe was attached to the main one which just crumbled away when they removed it.

 

The insides of the pipes were in no better shape, even the good parts

 

So new pipes are being installed.  And to do that, he had to call around to find someone who had 2' x 5' scaffolding that they could set up in the small space between us and our neighbor's house.

 

Any suggestions on the color for the ceilings?  I lean towards plain white.  He suggests Benjamin Moore or Kelly Moore.  He tends to use the latter, since it's made locally, as I mentioned.  Apparently "Swiss Coffee" from KM is popular.  

post #4750 of 5754

Does SF require bell and spigot cast ironon exterior DWV?I realize this stuff was installed back when thats all there was but they hung onto some strange old codes up there. Joe Mazola and the notorious local 38

post #4751 of 5754

Isn't renovation fun?

 

lefty

post #4752 of 5754

@Numbernine, I have have no idea, but could ask.  The new stuff is definitely thinner than the old stuff. 

 

@lefty, If I had a bigger bank account, I'd say yes, no question.  It's such a learning experience.  And I like to learn.

 

Also, if I knew we'd be living here forever, it'd easier to say yes.   As it is though, I'd say it's more fun than not, since I'll probably survive, and just moving to that neighborhood from our current place will improve the quality of life for my whole family.  But it's also caused some loss of sleep.  The windows issue, for example.  Do we renovate the kitchen?  Do we have enough for that?  One thing that complicates that is that there's a small "room" just off the kitchen that holds the washer and dryer side by side.  It's just timber and wooden slats, painted.  You go through that to get to a small deck with a ramp to the back yard.  I would love to fix that room up right, seal up the exterior door, stack the washer/dryer, and install a half bath.  Then put another door through the kitchen wall out to the deck.  But based on the bathroom cost, I'm guessing doing those things would add $60-80,000.  If we don't have the money to do that, do we still renovate the kitchen?  If we don't, would my wife kill me?  Would that be the best solution?  I'll tell you that it definitely is interesting.

post #4753 of 5754
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

@Numbernine
, I have have no idea, but could ask.  The new stuff is definitely thinner than the old stuff. 

@lefty
, If I had a bigger bank account, I'd say yes, no question.  It's such a learning experience.  And I like to learn.

Also, if I knew we'd be living here forever, it'd easier to say yes.   As it is though, I'd say it's more fun than not, since I'll probably survive, and just moving to that neighborhood from our current place will improve the quality of life for my whole family.  But it's also caused some loss of sleep.  The windows issue, for example.  Do we renovate the kitchen?  Do we have enough for that?  One thing that complicates that is that there's a small "room" just off the kitchen that holds the washer and dryer side by side.  It's just timber and wooden slats, painted.  You go through that to get to a small deck with a ramp to the back yard.  I would love to fix that room up right, seal up the exterior door, stack the washer/dryer, and install a half bath.  Then put another door through the kitchen wall out to the deck.  But based on the bathroom cost, I'm guessing doing those things would add $60-80,000.  If we don't have the money to do that, do we still renovate the kitchen?  If we don't, would my wife kill me?  Would that be the best solution?  I'll tell you that it definitely is interesting.

The projects never end even when you think your done.
post #4754 of 5754

To each his own but I find restoring old houses a very satisfying way to spend time

Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post
 

@Numbernine, I have have no idea, but could ask.  The new stuff is definitely thinner than the old stuff. 

 

@lefty, If I had a bigger bank account, I'd say yes, no question.  It's such a learning experience.  And I like to learn.

 

Also, if I knew we'd be living here forever, it'd easier to say yes.   As it is though, I'd say it's more fun than not, since I'll probably survive, and just moving to that neighborhood from our current place will improve the quality of life for my whole family.  But it's also caused some loss of sleep.  The windows issue, for example.  Do we renovate the kitchen?  Do we have enough for that?  One thing that complicates that is that there's a small "room" just off the kitchen that holds the washer and dryer side by side.  It's just timber and wooden slats, painted.  You go through that to get to a small deck with a ramp to the back yard.  I would love to fix that room up right, seal up the exterior door, stack the washer/dryer, and install a half bath.  Then put another door through the kitchen wall out to the deck.  But based on the bathroom cost, I'm guessing doing those things would add $60-80,000.  If we don't have the money to do that, do we still renovate the kitchen?  If we don't, would my wife kill me?  Would that be the best solution?  I'll tell you that it definitely is interesting.


My 2 cents worth,I would re-do the mud room add the 1/2 bath and new entry. Then I would get by with the old kitchen until I had the time and money to do it as a stand alone project . It buys you some time in the house to get a real feel for what you want in the  new kitchen.A kitchen shouldn't have to compete with other projectsIMO.:D

post #4755 of 5754

^I agree.  My plan was to do the kitchen next summer, but my wife really wants it asap.  She said, "My happiness would increase greatly."  Before the kitchen, I was thinking we'd repair water damage downstairs, do the wiring, windows, back deck, laundry/half bath, and fix up the in-law unit downstairs.  A new garage door and opener too, probably.

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