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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 312

post #4666 of 5750
I would avoid using recessed lighting in a 1907 house, especially in a bathroom of moderate size. One overhead light, along with lighting over the vanity should be plenty.

We have lighting over the vanity and one overhead and I almost never use the overhead light. The only people who do are the cleaning ladies.

I think overall your choices are good and fitting of a 1907 house.

Just one thing, and I may well stand alone with this one.....restore the windows. There is a beautiful 1920's house nearby to us, designed by a local architect with a FLW obsession, it's gorgeous, steel and concrete, brick, slate roof, beautiful wide plank oak floors and it had steel framed windows. Someone bought it....first thing they did was tear out the old steel frame windows and replace with a horror show of aluminum framed nastiness.
post #4667 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Just one thing, and I may well stand alone with this one.....restore the windows. There is a beautiful 1920's house nearby to us, designed by a local architect with a FLW obsession, it's gorgeous, steel and concrete, brick, slate roof, beautiful wide plank oak floors and it had steel framed windows. Someone bought it....first thing they did was tear out the old steel frame windows and replace with a horror show of aluminum framed nastiness.

 

We have the original wood windows in our house with storm windows.  If we could somehow restore them, I would not buy new.  The years of swelling and shrinking are working against them but surprisingly the worst windows in the house are the 3 that are newer.

post #4668 of 5750
You have to make good friends with a woodworker who has alot of spare time if you own an old house biggrin.gif
post #4669 of 5750

On the window discussion I have a 1780's farmhouse with mostly original windows (new glass mixed in of course, but the the original frames and such) and some 'newer stuff from the 1830-40's. Cost to rebuild them is about $500 per opening. that includes replacing broken glass, rebuilding the windows and Sashes as needed, re glazing and repairing the pulley weights as needed. This is in eastern Connecticut from a guy who has been doing it for longer than I have been alive. This is a pretty top end rebuild from what I have seen, but he does excellent work. Hopes it plants an idea in your mind.

 

Marc

post #4670 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

On the window discussion I have a 1780's farmhouse with mostly original windows (new glass mixed in of course, but the the original frames and such) and some 'newer stuff from the 1830-40's. Cost to rebuild them is about $500 per opening. that includes replacing broken glass, rebuilding the windows and Sashes as needed, re glazing and repairing the pulley weights as needed. This is in eastern Connecticut from a guy who has been doing it for longer than I have been alive. This is a pretty top end rebuild from what I have seen, but he does excellent work. Hopes it plants an idea in your mind.

Marc

From the limited amount of information I have heard about window restoration, I have also heard that good restoration is pretty comparable, cost wise, to a top-end replacement window. If that's the case, I would definitely go with the restoration!
post #4671 of 5750

We were looking at more than $500 per window for new windows so that may be an option.

post #4672 of 5750

Thanks guys.  So far, we're leaning toward restoring the windows.  They're the old wavy glass, w/ the occasional bubble.  So lots of beautiful character.  There's two problems with that though: insulation (single pane) and the fact that they're non-tempered.  The first part isn't too big of a concern in SF w/ our mild weather.  But the second is huge to us, since we have kids and afaik, non-tempered glass breaks into lethal ahards.  I've had nightmares of an earthquate breaking the windows and slicing our necks while we sleep.  Am I being silly?

 

@SkinnyGoomba I agree w/ you to an extent on recessed lighting in a small bathroom. Ours will be pretty small (5'6" x 8"), but the contractor plans to put five lights in, I believe.  4" LED cans, two above the tub, one each over the sink, toilet, and door.  Our current bathrooms have a light/vent in the middle and lamps over the vanity.  I'd probably have gone with that, but the new main bath will have a fairly large window over the sink.  So, no room for lamps or mirror there Although, we may hang a mirror over the lower windowpane, which I've seen in other old homes and liked.

 

The floor's been removed from the bathroom.  It was about 3/4" higher than the hallway floor.  The new floor should be level with the hallway, although that may take shaving down the joists a bit.

 

 

The asbestos is gone from the ceilings and we were given three options:  (1) scrape, skim coat, and paint, (2) nail drywall over the ceiling, and paint, or (3) tear out the lath and plaster ceiling and install a drywall one.  We went with the first option.  So he's going to scrape loose material (old skim coat and paint), then patch holes/dents and skim cracks, then put a coat of primer on, then a skim coat over the whole thing, then two layers of primer and two of paint.  Seems like overkill to me and my brother, an architect, but these guys are supposed to be total perfectionists.  Price reflects that too, unfortunately.

post #4673 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Thanks guys.  So far, we're leaning toward restoring the windows.  They're the old wavy glass, w/ the occasional bubble.  So lots of beautiful character.  There's two problems with that though: insulation (single pane) and the fact that they're non-tempered.  The first part isn't too big of a concern in SF w/ our mild weather.  But the second is huge to us, since we have kids and afaik, non-tempered glass breaks into lethal ahards.  I've had nightmares of an earthquate breaking the windows and slicing our necks while we sleep.  Am I being silly?

Wavy glass means it is at least (usually) 80+ years old and in reality probably dates back to the original house at 109 years old. I don't k ow much aboutSF, but I seem to recall them having an earthquake or two during that time period

I have glass saying back 200 years survived hurricane sandy and who the hell k ows what else. If a baseball hit if, yeah, it is going to shatter into the house. Ifthe panes are properly glazed and restored if they crack due to movement, they should crack and stay in the actual frame.

I would say that you are fine smile.gif
post #4674 of 5750
I second Voorhees. If the glass has made it this far, it's unlikely to be a problem. Unless you're constrained in room layout to putting a bed under the window, it doesn't seem like something to worry about.
post #4675 of 5750

Thanks guys.  That is a good thought:  If it's survived this long, how bad could it be?  I've considered that, but then I have that image of a kid with a severe cut/severed limb flash into my head. 

 

Man, houses are a pita.

 

We decided on DXV tub, sink, and toilet.  Kohler Finial sink and tub fixtures.  Relative the (crazy) total for the renovation, we figured a little extra for better-made stuff made sense.  

post #4676 of 5750
They are a PITA. But occasionally worth it.

I wouldn't worry about the windows unless they're at a height where a kid could run/fall into them. In which case I'd worry about drunk adults doing the same... smile.gif
post #4677 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

On the window discussion I have a 1780's farmhouse with mostly original windows (new glass mixed in of course, but the the original frames and such) and some 'newer stuff from the 1830-40's. Cost to rebuild them is about $500 per opening. that includes replacing broken glass, rebuilding the windows and Sashes as needed, re glazing and repairing the pulley weights as needed. This is in eastern Connecticut from a guy who has been doing it for longer than I have been alive. This is a pretty top end rebuild from what I have seen, but he does excellent work. Hopes it plants an idea in your mind.

Marc
There was a This Old House show where they recently did this. They showed the guys coming in and fixing all the weight ropes and fixing up the old windows so that they all functioned again. They also said what you said about price and being competitive with a new window. I never knew it could be done and for a good price.
post #4678 of 5750
I can see where their process may lend itself to a better result. If they are experts in plaster work I would just let them do as they suggest.
post #4679 of 5750
So I've hardly been bit by a mosquito all year. But it turns out no one else has, either. The City seems to have doubled the mosquito truck rounds (I guess because of zika) and maybe other efforts as well. It's practically eliminated the buggers.

I sure do appreciate the local politicians taking a hit from their usual pilfering to do something for the community.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Let myself get a little carried away and got one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/451-3-Gallon-2-Stroke-Powered-Backpack/dp/B0068J9ZJ4



It's not a fogger, exactly. More like a really good gas-powered sprayer. I got it mostly for mosquitoes, but it can spray herbicides, fungicides, etc. too. The really good ones are supposed to be sprayed, but boy is that tedious with a pump sprayer.
post #4680 of 5750
Anyone with experience with Harrington Brass or Waterworks Bath fixtures? Are the worth the $$$?
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