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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 273

post #4081 of 5817
What's the most reliable garage door loft mechanism? I am about to switch and I know genie but is there anything better?
post #4082 of 5817
Everyone I know out here has LiftMaster.
post #4083 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Everyone I know out here has LiftMaster.

My current house and my last house had them. In the last house it was a decade of spotless service.
post #4084 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post

Has anyone converted a gas fireplace back to wood? Any regrets?

Fireplace I'm considering was originally wood, so the home inspector said there should be no issues switching it back (and suggested that it's good to leave the gas line to help with starting the fire).

Place I'm moving into has three fireplaces, all gas. Would like to have the one in the family room be wood burning, and leave the other two gas so I can just go flip the switch when I'm feeling lazy.

Where is the cut off valve? Ours is inside the fireplace which renders a gas starter not possible. We were also told technically our fireplace is "unsound" since some of the liner is failing. The fireplace guy wouldn't convert it without repairing it. $4000. Pass.
post #4085 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post


Where is the cut off valve? Ours is inside the fireplace which renders a gas starter not possible. We were also told technically our fireplace is "unsound" since some of the liner is failing. The fireplace guy wouldn't convert it without repairing it. $4000. Pass.

 

We were lucky to have our gas valve outside but we kept the gas fireplace instead of converting to wood.  Our basement/drive in garage also has a fireplace but it is wood burning and we never use it.  My sister-in-law had a similar situation where converting an "unsound" fireplace into a sound fireplace would be in the same $4-5,000 range.

post #4086 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Everyone I know out here has LiftMaster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

My current house and my last house had them. In the last house it was a decade of spotless service.

thanks a lot, assuming you guys went with belt vs chain to avoid noise
post #4087 of 5817
For me, the chain v belt choice is more about not having an exposed, greasy chain. The majority of the noise in operation in my installation is due to the opener's being mounted to the floor joists of the room above. It's not particularly loud, but what noise there is directly transmitted to the living space.
post #4088 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post

Where is the cut off valve? Ours is inside the fireplace which renders a gas starter not possible. We were also told technically our fireplace is "unsound" since some of the liner is failing. The fireplace guy wouldn't convert it without repairing it. $4000. Pass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

We were lucky to have our gas valve outside but we kept the gas fireplace instead of converting to wood.  Our basement/drive in garage also has a fireplace but it is wood burning and we never use it.  My sister-in-law had a similar situation where converting an "unsound" fireplace into a sound fireplace would be in the same $4-5,000 range.

Thanks gents. Have to double check where the valve is. Home inspector gave a cursory look and said everything looks fine, but did recommend a chimney expert take a look. Closing is next Friday, at which point I'll probably become a regular in this thread.

Moving from a 900 sq foot townhouse with no real yard to a 2,800 sq ft single family home on just over an acre
post #4089 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post


Thanks gents. Have to double check where the valve is. Home inspector gave a cursory look and said everything looks fine, but did recommend a chimney expert take a look. Closing is next Friday, at which point I'll probably become a regular in this thread.

Moving from a 900 sq foot townhouse with no real yard to a 2,800 sq ft single family home on just over an acre

Ah, I think we can start a club! Congrats and welcome cheers.gif
post #4090 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

Ah, I think we can start a club! Congrats and welcome cheers.gif

Was just reading back and saw your post; congrats to you as well, and thanks for the welcome!

The similarities continue, as we're also moving from 80s construction to 30s. The good news for us is that the previous overs took wonderful care of the place. The bad news is that they're selling to move to a retirement community, and some of their paint and wallpaper choices are, shall we say, not to our taste. Can't wait to get in there and rip the carpet off the original hardwood floors in the bedrooms.
post #4091 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post

Was just reading back and saw your post; congrats to you as well, and thanks for the welcome!

The similarities continue, as we're also moving from 80s construction to 30s. The good news for us is that the previous overs took wonderful care of the place. The bad news is that they're selling to move to a retirement community, and some of their paint and wallpaper choices are, shall we say, not to our taste. Can't wait to get in there and rip the carpet off the original hardwood floors in the bedrooms.

Oh wow, cool coincidence. Good luck with the changes - that is definitely pretty fun. But it can be a bit stressful as well... so just sip on your favorite drink over the next few months and you'll be just fine. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

We changed our kitchen completely, blew out a wall, repainted the whole place, lots of new lighting, etc. Now we are working on getting our 4 decks redone (one down, 3 to go), and changing some things in the downstairs family room. nod[1].gif
post #4092 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

Oh wow, cool coincidence. Good luck with the changes - that is definitely pretty fun. But it can be a bit stressful as well... so just sip on your favorite drink over the next few months and you'll be just fine. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

We changed our kitchen completely, blew out a wall, repainted the whole place, lots of new lighting, etc. Now we are working on getting our 4 decks redone (one down, 3 to go), and changing some things in the downstairs family room. nod[1].gif

We're fortunate that the kitchen was just redone 4 years ago with pretty high-end appliances and really nice cabinets, so that's one major expense out of the way. Most everything we want to do is superficial - paint pretty much the whole house and likely have to refinish some of the floors. The exception is the family room which will likely need new walls. We'll also be fencing some or all of the yard, and I'm somewhat terrified of what that's going to run me. And the shed is on it's last legs; fortunately we're less than an hour from Amish country, and for not much more than prefab you can bring some of their carpenters out to build you something nice.

Yeah, you don't think there's much to do, and then you start writing it all down smile.gif
post #4093 of 5817

We went with the aluminum fencing that looks like wrought iron and a little under 200 linear feet ran close to $7K.  Some people in our neighborhood will do a weird mix of brick and wood or aluminum like ours mixed with wood and it never looks very good.  

 

Has anyone repaired motar on their own and cares to comment?  We have some rock based retaining walls where the motar on the top is cracking and I feel like it should be an easy job but don't know if that is the case.  It would not be a structural fix, just cosmetic.  I am also thinking of doing some small brick projects at the same time but again, if motar is too much of a hassle, brickwork is too.

post #4094 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

We went with the aluminum fencing that looks like wrought iron and a little under 200 linear feet ran close to $7K.  Some people in our neighborhood will do a weird mix of brick and wood or aluminum like ours mixed with wood and it never looks very good.  

I'm considering the same stuff. How high is your fence? We're probably looking at either ~250 or 650-700 linear feet, depending on how crazy we want to go.
post #4095 of 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post


I'm considering the same stuff. How high is your fence? We're probably looking at either ~250 or 650-700 linear feet, depending on how crazy we want to go.

 

Our fence is 4' but they have a lower one which could save money.  Up close you can see they are held together by screws and such but it makes for easy repairs.  We had a branch fall and break a picket and while wrought iron would need welding, the picket can be unscrewed and replaced easily.  

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