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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 272

post #4066 of 5750

Greatest. Screw design. Ever.

 

 

lefty

post #4067 of 5750
I don't think those square head screws scale well to various sizes. The nice thing about Philips is that you don't necessarily need the right size driver to get the job done. Robertson seems like a poor man's Allen head screw.
post #4068 of 5750
If you want stripped screw heads, sure.
post #4069 of 5750

Well everything in Nashville seemed to be shut down today (due to 6 inches of snow) except the crazy guys that work at the new electrician we decided to try.  They were here early, explained any issues, and were quick!  They suggested a couple of things which I just went with and the new lighting in the baby's room turned out great.  They also do some other home maintenance items so we are using them from here on out unless we have a warranty issue for items purchased from our old company.

 

The baby's room is close to being done except for waiting on furniture to arrive.

 

I haven't figured out my next project but adding some shelving in our pantry and then our storage room sound like easy to tackle items until spring.

post #4070 of 5750
Sorry if this is already noted in this thread - have any of guys tried getting a certified electrician or plumbing license in your state as a way to stay in code?

The process is a convoluted mess in California. The tests themselves sound trivial - open book and multiple choice:

post #4071 of 5750
I don't think a license is required to remain code-compliant. You just need to do the work properly and pass inspection.
post #4072 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

I don't think a license is required to remain code-compliant. You just need to do the work properly and pass inspection.

 

I think it depends on the state.  My understanding here is that you can do your work yourself, but must remain code compliant, but if you're hiring someone they need to be licensed.

post #4073 of 5750
If you don't have a relationship with the inspector getting sign off might be problematic.
post #4074 of 5750
Thanks for the advice guys.
post #4075 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

If you don't have a relationship with the inspector getting sign off might be problematic.

Indeed. They're not going to assume that you know what you're doing, so the inspection will likely be more involved. But compliant is compliant.
post #4076 of 5750
I rewired my whole house in Portland, Oregon. Pulled a permit and the only addition the inspector required was adding 2 more plugs in the kitchen. Also did framing for a new bathroom with my own hand drawn plans - passed with no comments. Obviously depends on the city and inspector - but if you're competent and friendly you should be fine.
post #4077 of 5750

 A lot of what the permit /inspection process is all about is protecting the homeowner from unscrupulous or inexperienced contractors . When you pull a homeowners permit that is not of so much concern. Unless it is a direct code violation or fee issue they are not going to pick the work apart as much if you did it yourself

post #4078 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by js0930 View Post

I. Obviously depends on the city and inspector - but if you're competent and friendly you should be fine.
post #4079 of 5750
I grew up knowing people that did sideline work, such as my brother that did wiring for additions, remodels, etc. He was trained by an electrician and would do this stuff on weekends for extra money. He had problems getting initial passes until the guy he worked under was present for a few inspections, let the inspectors know he knew his shit, and he never had problems after that.

Remember, most inspectors were tradesmen prior to becoming inspectors. They've a built in urge to not want to see unlicensed folks on their turf, so while a competent unlicensed guy they know won't have problems, the random DIY homeowner might get some higher level of scrutiny.
post #4080 of 5750
Has anyone converted a gas fireplace back to wood? Any regrets?

Fireplace I'm considering was originally wood, so the home inspector said there should be no issues switching it back (and suggested that it's good to leave the gas line to help with starting the fire).

Place I'm moving into has three fireplaces, all gas. Would like to have the one in the family room be wood burning, and leave the other two gas so I can just go flip the switch when I'm feeling lazy.
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