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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 262

post #3916 of 5749

Did I? I posted a few I was interested in but I didn't think this one.

 

Anyway, Happy New Year, Finn.

 

lefty

post #3917 of 5749
100% sure.

Thanks you to.
post #3918 of 5749
lefty, that is one hell of a cabin. I am jealous.
post #3919 of 5749

Thanks, but WTF are you doing on SF at 9:30 on NYE? Put the computer down and go out, dude.

 

lefty

post #3920 of 5749
Don't worry, heading out to meet up with the new lady soon. She is erudite and likes Seinfeld; that's marriage material.
post #3921 of 5749

Break a leg, kid.

 

lefty

post #3922 of 5749
Congrats on the cabin, looks pretty awesome, I like the timber frame posts and such.

Conne,

I am using Benjamin Moore super white on the walls in eggshell and semi gloss for the trim. I used a color called nimbus, which is a light grey, for the ceiling.

I have used regal, but decided to use natura, awesome stuff and doesn't really smell much at all. We cracked the windows at night after I painted, but even then only my wife noticed the smell.

Fair warning on eggshell, your drywall prep needs to be very well done or you will see everything.
post #3923 of 5749

I painted the ceiling and closet white yesterday and noticed a couple ceiling spots that I need to fix.  The previous ceiling color must have been a shade of gray as I walked around the room with a bright lamp and did not notice those imperfections.  I will look again today with some better daylight but my other corrections blended in fine.  My only concern on the walls are some slight cracks I had to fill in which I have not dealt with before.  Everything else on the walls was filling in small holes or scraping off build up that the previous painters left.  

 

Also congrats on the cabin Lefty!  Looks like it will be a lot of fun.  My wife would never go for a cabin.

post #3924 of 5749
If the cracks return, carve them out, then use drywall compound and tape.

I had a fix a couple cracks in the drywall around my place, they cracked because the builder didn't tape the seam...oddly enough. They taped all of them except a handful of short seams...which all cracked.

I like drywall compound rather than spackle for anything that needs a heavier fill and feathering out.
post #3925 of 5749
Has anyone here poured their own cement pad? I have dug out, I will add and compact a base, but I am trying to Dave big money on the finishing.

Was quoted around 4k to pour the 600sqft pad 7.75 cuyds. I can get cement delivered direct for about 1100, but they wont finish it or help finish it. So I might give it a go? Any thoughts? Any tips?

Thanks!
post #3926 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

Has anyone here poured their own cement pad? I have dug out, I will add and compact a base, but I am trying to Dave big money on the finishing.

Was quoted around 4k to pour the 600sqft pad 7.75 cuyds. I can get cement delivered direct for about 1100, but they wont finish it or help finish it. So I might give it a go? Any thoughts? Any tips?

Thanks!

 

That sounds crazy high.  I had my driveway, which was ~1200 square ft for $5500.  It was just a basic finishing, but they tore out the old blacktop driveway and poured for that price.

post #3927 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

Has anyone here poured their own cement pad? I have dug out, I will add and compact a base, but I am trying to Dave big money on the finishing.

Was quoted around 4k to pour the 600sqft pad 7.75 cuyds. I can get cement delivered direct for about 1100, but they wont finish it or help finish it. So I might give it a go? Any thoughts? Any tips?

Thanks!

I think you could probably do that yourself - 600sf isn't that large and it's not rocket science ...

If you're already getting the compactor, I would be sure to compact the grade first, unless it was undisturbed and is rock solid. Then compact the road base that you put underneath the concrete.

You do need steel, and that's the tricky part - if you don't steel reinforce it with rebar, it's going to crack and it will be much, much weaker. You can look at pictures and guides on the net, but I would think an 18" grid across the entire thing would be fine if no heavy trucks/equipment will ever use it, and you need to raise the rebar up with these little plastic "chairs" so that it ends up in the *middle* of the concrete, not just sitting on the bottom.

The final piece is the expansion joints - you know, the cracks in the sidewalk every 3-4 feet ... if the pad is 20x30, I would think a simple tic tac toe grid of joints - so 10' x 7', give or take, for each square in the tic-tac-toe board. I don't know how to trowel joints, so if I was doing it myself, I would probably cut joints with a circular saw and a diamond blade - you'll need to read up about that. Cut joints are not as good as troweled joints, though, and that's what you hire someone for.

If this is just a 4" thick pad for patio/deck/whatever, I would do it myself and this is a good direction to go. if this is a garage/workshop or anything that will see real vehicle use (parking, etc.) I would pay someone to really do things right (hand troweled joints, 12" x 12" rebar, 6 sack mix, etc.)

Oh, and remember - the longer the concrete takes to dry (cure) the stronger it is - so plan to "water" it every 4 hours or so for the first few days and it will cure very slowly and be stronger.
post #3928 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by john_sf View Post

I think you could probably do that yourself - 600sf isn't that large and it's not rocket science ...

If you're already getting the compactor, I would be sure to compact the grade first, unless it was undisturbed and is rock solid. Then compact the road base that you put underneath the concrete.

You do need steel, and that's the tricky part - if you don't steel reinforce it with rebar, it's going to crack and it will be much, much weaker. You can look at pictures and guides on the net, but I would think an 18" grid across the entire thing would be fine if no heavy trucks/equipment will ever use it, and you need to raise the rebar up with these little plastic "chairs" so that it ends up in the *middle* of the concrete, not just sitting on the bottom.

The final piece is the expansion joints - you know, the cracks in the sidewalk every 3-4 feet ... if the pad is 20x30, I would think a simple tic tac toe grid of joints - so 10' x 7', give or take, for each square in the tic-tac-toe board. I don't know how to trowel joints, so if I was doing it myself, I would probably cut joints with a circular saw and a diamond blade - you'll need to read up about that. Cut joints are not as good as troweled joints, though, and that's what you hire someone for.

If this is just a 4" thick pad for patio/deck/whatever, I would do it myself and this is a good direction to go. if this is a garage/workshop or anything that will see real vehicle use (parking, etc.) I would pay someone to really do things right (hand troweled joints, 12" x 12" rebar, 6 sack mix, etc.)

Oh, and remember - the longer the concrete takes to dry (cure) the stronger it is - so plan to "water" it every 4 hours or so for the first few days and it will cure very slowly and be stronger.

Hi john, some crazy good advice there.

Do, let me just chat about a few things. This will essentially be a basement floor (interior to a barn building)at grade. Iam going with a 3500# mix 4in pour with 4in base below compacted every 2 in.

Having talked with contractor, they thought that the rebar base would be major overkill since this will essentially be a shop floor. They suggested going with a mesh interlay, cheaper and much easier. Do you have any experience?
With regards to the expansion joints, I would prefer cut because I will be rolling tools around and I do t want things slamming into cracks or getting stuck. But since the pad is inside the insulated envelope of the building, does it need expansion joints? I can't remember if my basement floors had then back when I had a contractor poured basement.

Tha k you so much for the advice!!
post #3929 of 5749
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Congrats on the cabin, looks pretty awesome, I like the timber frame posts and such.

Conne,

I am using Benjamin Moore super white on the walls in eggshell and semi gloss for the trim. I used a color called nimbus, which is a light grey, for the ceiling.

I have used regal, but decided to use natura, awesome stuff and doesn't really smell much at all. We cracked the windows at night after I painted, but even then only my wife noticed the smell.

Fair warning on eggshell, your drywall prep needs to be very well done or you will see everything.

 

 

Do you have any pics of an area where all three colors are visible? This is similar to the colors I'm suggesting to the wife for our home.

post #3930 of 5749
I can take some pics later on.

Anyone have suggestions on good screw-in type LEDs. I thought I had it covered, but I have one in regular use (8 hours/day) and it died after a few months, second attempt on that one as well to eliminate the possibility of a bad batch, both died in similar time frames.
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