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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 259

post #3871 of 6350
I've had good experiences with Luceplan, Artemide and Louis Poulsen. Poulsen installs can be a bit tricky because they, generally, do not overlap the box by a large margin, which can be tough if the drywall is not perfect around the box, but if everything is right they look great.

I like the metropoli lamp from Luceplan, I used it in my basement stairwell. Well built, easy on bulbs and has a nice reveal around the top so it can hide inconsistencies in the drywall near the base.
post #3872 of 6350
I'm about to hang a Poulsen lamp that I got with a bare wire.

any idea for a replacement top piece (what is it even called? mounting plate?) that would cover the hole left by a contractor-grade ceiling fan? I can't come up with the right words to google.
post #3873 of 6350
Canopy! the word appears to be canopy.

At least that's what I found by googling installation instructions for various poulsen lamps and hoping they had a detailed parts diagram.

Now I just have to find one that looks decent.
post #3874 of 6350

I'm going to jump in on this thread... my wife and I purchased our second new construction home last May from Pulte Homes. We basically took contractor grade everything because the upgrade fees were outrageous, and we're replacing things slowly over time. So far we've really only done the floors: we replaced the entire first floor carpet and tile (except for bathrooms) with a Mannington laminate, and we replaced the baseboards at the same time. Shortly after the new year we plan on doing crown moulding throughout first floor and then painting the interior. Second floor project won't start for a few years: that's going to be converted into a home theater.

 

Hope I'll be able to contribute and find helpful info over time.

post #3875 of 6350
You can get one from poulsen....or eBay.
post #3876 of 6350
Quote:
Originally Posted by flvinny521 View Post

I'm going to jump in on this thread... my wife and I purchased our second new construction home last May from Pulte Homes. We basically took contractor grade everything because the upgrade fees were outrageous, and we're replacing things slowly over time. So far we've really only done the floors: we replaced the entire first floor carpet and tile (except for bathrooms) with a Mannington laminate, and we replaced the baseboards at the same time. Shortly after the new year we plan on doing crown moulding throughout first floor and then painting the interior. Second floor project won't start for a few years: that's going to be converted into a home theater.

Hope I'll be able to contribute and find helpful info over time.

Why pay the premium for new construction if you're planning on changing a lot of stuff anyway?
post #3877 of 6350
I always found this baffling as well, but one of my friends went through it recently including hiring a contractor to do all of the real detail work after the fact (closets, fixtures, ect, ect) and all told I believe it was much less involved than a renovation.

I've yet to grasp why most home builders cant simply install the box and cap it for the homeowner to install their own fixtures, but that seems to be the case for most of them.
post #3878 of 6350

Anyone have experience making their own cabinets? I have been debating the merits of just doing it. 20k from Ikea doesn't really seem all that reasonable for the kitchen.

post #3879 of 6350
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flvinny521 View Post

I'm going to jump in on this thread... my wife and I purchased our second new construction home last May from Pulte Homes. We basically took contractor grade everything because the upgrade fees were outrageous, and we're replacing things slowly over time. So far we've really only done the floors: we replaced the entire first floor carpet and tile (except for bathrooms) with a Mannington laminate, and we replaced the baseboards at the same time. Shortly after the new year we plan on doing crown moulding throughout first floor and then painting the interior. Second floor project won't start for a few years: that's going to be converted into a home theater.

Hope I'll be able to contribute and find helpful info over time.

Why pay the premium for new construction if you're planning on changing a lot of stuff anyway?

 

There were a lot of factors that went into our decision,. The bottom line was that there were a few hurdles to jump through in terms of timeline (selling existing home and getting into a new home), not being able to live in a renovation project all the time with our twins, not being able to find an existing home in a community like the one we got with new construction (number of homes, monthly dues, friendly feel, school districts), etc. In the future, if we do new construction again, we'll buy a lot somewhere and hire our own builder so we have full control, vs. buying in a development where there are so many limitations.

post #3880 of 6350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

Anyone have experience making their own cabinets? I have been debating the merits of just doing it. 20k from Ikea doesn't really seem all that reasonable for the kitchen.

You may want to source the carcasses from a local cabinet shop and do the install yourself.

I'm building a cabinet as a hobby, but it's a bit different than kitchen cabinetry, which will involve some carpentry work as well.
post #3881 of 6350
I have not built a lot of cabinets, but it's really not hard if you have the right tools -- a good table saw, mostly. Maybe a track saw would work. Of course it depends on what you're going for and all that as to how complex it really is.

You'd probably want to buy the doors from a local shop or from someone who makes them. Generally the best idea is to build the cabinets first and order the doors to fit.
post #3882 of 6350
Didn have a chance to flesh out my thoughts earlier;

Buy good plywood, which in this case will be AAA grade hardwood plywood with a veneer core, and many yards can source S4S lumber, which stands for 'surfaced four sides', buy that and not rough sawn lumber. Rough sawn lumber is for someone, like myself or like Ataturk, who are capable of processing lumber.

There are some good online resources such as Woodcentral, Woodnet and Sawmillcreek.

Festool stuff is really good, for the most part, it's engineered around the traveling carpenter/cabinet maker, best part is that practically all of it is designed to hook up to a vacuum and the festool vacuums are nice.

I have a book called 'The Home Cabinetmaker' that my father gave me some years ago, it's a good basic walk through and how-to of building basic furniture and kitchen cabinets without owning a cabinet shop full of tools.

You dont have to spend a fortune, but avoid junky tools, they make stuff much more difficult.
post #3883 of 6350
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Didn have a chance to flesh out my thoughts earlier;

Buy good plywood, which in this case will be AAA grade hardwood plywood with a veneer core, and many yards can source S4S lumber, which stands for 'surfaced four sides', buy that and not rough sawn lumber. Rough sawn lumber is for someone, like myself or like Ataturk, who are capable of processing lumber.

There are some good online resources such as Woodcentral, Woodnet and Sawmillcreek.

Festool stuff is really good, for the most part, it's engineered around the traveling carpenter/cabinet maker, best part is that practically all of it is designed to hook up to a vacuum and the festool vacuums are nice.

I have a book called 'The Home Cabinetmaker' that my father gave me some years ago, it's a good basic walk through and how-to of building basic furniture and kitchen cabinets without owning a cabinet shop full of tools.

You dont have to spend a fortune, but avoid junky tools, they make stuff much more difficult.

Fair enough. I have a fairly well equipped shop and I have done wood working before, however, I have never built something so large scale before. I have the ability to process lumber as well as the next guy, however I am more concerned with the finishing on everything. 

post #3884 of 6350
Ahh, see I dont know where you are starting from so I'm giving very broad based advice.

Dont know how soon you are planning to do this, but I am building a couple vanities later this year (probably over the summer), so I can post up some progress results if you are curious.
post #3885 of 6350
Finally put up the last two ceiling lights, I have to take them down again to paint, but that will be a while.

Nearly everything heavy and faux-bronze from the old owner is now gone. New ceiling fan on the way to replace the old junker.....didnt go as wild as I wanted to there and went with Torsion from modern fan rather than the one from Bigassfans which was awesome but also 3x pricing.
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