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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 252

post #3766 of 5824
CE that shit.
post #3767 of 5824
Finally banished the previous owners terrible color choices from one more room. I've been using anything as excuse to paint a full room, this was was a slight bit of mildew buildup over the shower stall. Cut it out, patched, the painted everything white except the ceiling, which is now light grey. Previously the room was yellow.

The drywall work in this house is terrible, whenever I paint I can count on almost a full day of drywall prep. And one side of the room is 12' tall...so not only one seam for the drywaller to fuck up....but one additional bonus seam for them to also leave showing.
post #3768 of 5824
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Finally banished the previous owners terrible color choices from one more room. I've been using anything as excuse to paint a full room, this was was a slight bit of mildew buildup over the shower stall. Cut it out, patched, the painted everything white except the ceiling, which is now light grey. Previously the room was yellow.

The drywall work in this house is terrible, whenever I paint I can count on almost a full day of drywall prep. And one side of the room is 12' tall...so not only one seam for the drywaller to fuck up....but one additional bonus seam for them to also leave showing.

 

Tell me about bad decorating choices.... Blood Red Paneling and white plaster..... very VERY 18th Century. Any excuse I can come up with to paint is being taken

post #3769 of 5824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Finally banished the previous owners terrible color choices from one more room. I've been using anything as excuse to paint a full room, this was was a slight bit of mildew buildup over the shower stall. Cut it out, patched, the painted everything white except the ceiling, which is now light grey. Previously the room was yellow.

The drywall work in this house is terrible, whenever I paint I can count on almost a full day of drywall prep. And one side of the room is 12' tall...so not only one seam for the drywaller to fuck up....but one additional bonus seam for them to also leave showing.

 

Tell me about bad decorating choices.... Blood Red Paneling and white plaster..... very VERY 18th Century. Any excuse I can come up with to paint is being taken


The army says "If it don't move.........."

post #3770 of 5824

We are redoing our main bathroom due to a ruptured supply line and the tile is coming up and we are putting down new sub floor and tile. trying to decide if we want to put in heated floors. For those of you that have them do you use them often? Located in Canada, so there are plenty of cold days, just wondered if it's more of a novelty or a practical feature?

post #3771 of 5824
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelscott7 View Post

We are redoing our main bathroom due to a ruptured supply line and the tile is coming up and we are putting down new sub floor and tile. trying to decide if we want to put in heated floors. For those of you that have them do you use them often? Located in Canada, so there are plenty of cold days, just wondered if it's more of a novelty or a practical feature?

I'd like to do this myself sometime. We're in chicago area.
post #3772 of 5824
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelscott7 View Post

We are redoing our main bathroom due to a ruptured supply line and the tile is coming up and we are putting down new sub floor and tile. trying to decide if we want to put in heated floors. For those of you that have them do you use them often? Located in Canada, so there are plenty of cold days, just wondered if it's more of a novelty or a practical feature?

I'd like to do this myself sometime. We're in chicago area.


This is without a doubt IMO the best way to heat a living space or bathrooms but it does involve a hot water heat source. I don't live where heating or cooling are an issue but friends in the mountains use it quite a bit. We are all diy construction guys so I really don't have a handle on installation costs

post #3773 of 5824
There are also electric installs, and I might be wrong, but I would bet they would be very suitable for a small and limited application like a bathroom.
post #3774 of 5824
Electric is very easy to install, at least it was for me. Doesn't use much in terms of electricity so I was able to borrow it from an existing (lighting) circuit. Total added material cost was only about $300 for a larger bathroom.
post #3775 of 5824
For non permanent heat, you want electric... Flip a switch in the morning and by the time you turn the shower on, your can start to feel warmth. Easy to install and operating cost/efficiency doesn't matter since you are only running it for 30 minutes at a time.
post #3776 of 5824
post #3777 of 5824
All of the time I spend perfecting a drywall seam....then my wife wants me to hangup some artwork over it. plain.gif I want to bask in the glory of surface without lumps for a few months before covering it up.

This repair and paint has sparked a renovation bug in my wife, she is asking me to put down a wood floor, make cabinetry, do tile work and install new fixtures.....lol....
post #3778 of 5824

Last year my wife was bugging me to paint the laundry room . A month later I had refinished the kitchen cabinets, replaced the range, installed a vent hood, painted every room in the house and tiled my front porch and steps .  So yeah I hear you bro

post #3779 of 5824
The electric can also use a programmable thermostat so you don't have to flip any switches.
post #3780 of 5824

Thanks for all of the responses, I think we are going to have the electric in floor heating installed with the programmable thermostat.

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