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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 26

post #376 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

lefty, out of curiosity, what would you do for a landing? solid walnut?

 

Assuming it was in the budget, yes. I think those treads are really nice. I also would have either removed the stringer baseboard (not really sure what that is called) and had the treads come out of the wall or put in a walnut baseboard perhaps out of the same walnut veneer as the landing to get it to tie together.

 

It's always hard to make suggestions on SG's place because you only ever see tiny snippets of it. I do admire his skill as a woodworker.

 

lefty

post #377 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

The color will match, the oil finish turns it that color, and at the moment the treads still have a mill finish.

SG, aren't you the guy that made the humidor?


So the landing in that pic is treated and the treads are not, correct? Did you do the finish on the landing?

Shouldn't be too hard to get a color match.
post #378 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Any thoughts on dark grey tile for the basement?

Not my taste. Personally not a tile guy, though. How much ceiling do you have down there? Ever any basement water issues?
post #379 of 2432
Thanks Lefty,

Idfnl, that's exactly correct, I did the finish on the top and he treads are unfinished. Yes, I'm the one who did (is doing) the humidors.

This basement has been dry through Irene and Sandy, so it has a good track record. However after helping my parents toss their finished basement in the trash I'm hard to convince that it needs any wood other than the stairs. Though I'm considering finishing off another portion of this basement and redoing the part that is already finished with a fresh coat of paint and something for the floors.
post #380 of 2432
Thread Starter 
Goomba, now that I see it all together, I have to admit I don't love the plywood. It sort of has me asking the question, "why?" Why use a different material on the landing than on the treads? If you're going to do that, I'd think you'd have a purpose for it, to make a statement of some sort, but then you're trying to stain it all to look the same. I dunno, it just seems like you're caught in between using a different material to create a contrast and trying to hide it by staining and finishing it all the same.

With that said... it's your house, and if you like it, then enjoy it. There's no accounting for taste - and I mean that in a non-pejorative way; e.g. there is no hard math or rules for good vs. bad for a lot of this stuff.

As for the tile, I think it's very difficult to understand what you mean when you suggest "dark grey tile" with no other descriptors and we have very little to go on with respect to the current look or style of the house and where you want to take it.

I have a dark grey tile, charcoal nearing to black, in my kitchen, and I love it. But it's meant to look like stone, and has a very rough finish.

This is it up close:



And this is it in a very contemporary space:



....and I love it.

But there are, like, 50 shades of grey, cold greys and warm greys, polished finishes and rough finishes, smooth and rustic textures, etc etc etc. Grout color can make two identical tiles have very different feelings as well.

Overall, I endorse tile in basements, and I actually like them even in general living spaces where they are not often a first choice, but remember they can be a little cold underfoot... especially in a basement.
post #381 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

True, I need to head back over to the drinking thread.

Better yet, the drunk thread.
post #382 of 2432
I appreciate the advice on the tile, that approx the color I'm going for. I'll likely do something fairly smooth.

It would seem my plywood landing is universally disliked, at this point, I'm ok with that. The risers will be plywood as well. Since we're on the topic of veneer, I'd like to point out that both veneer and hardwood are different thicknesses of the same thing. One is glued to a substrate in a uniform fashion, the other is left at degree of thickness which allows it to be considered solid wood.

Also, no stain involved here, the wood is dark enough as is, I'm 'finishing' and oil finish has a tint to it normally.
post #383 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

It would seem my plywood landing is universally disliked, at this point, I'm ok with that. The risers will be plywood as well. Since we're on the topic of veneer, I'd like to point out that both veneer and hardwood are different thicknesses of the same thing. One is glued to a substrate in a uniform fashion, the other is left at degree of thickness which allows it to be considered solid wood.

You might have mentioned this, but why did you use ply anyway? Budget?

BTW, his humidor thread deserves a mention, pretty solid WW skills:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/286305/humidor-build-in-progress
post #384 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

(...)

It would seem my plywood landing is universally disliked, at this point, I'm ok with that. The risers will be plywood as well. Since we're on the topic of veneer, I'd like to point out that both veneer and hardwood are different thicknesses of the same thing. One is glued to a substrate in a uniform fashion, the other is left at degree of thickness which allows it to be considered solid wood.

(...)

oh, dear. I hope you stay current on your homeowners policy, and get extra coverage against complete structural collapse, because that's EXACTLY what's going to happen with your little plywood landing. One day you'll be walking on it and the veneer is going to creep up at the edge and you'll think - oh I'll just pull that little bit off and it will all be good - but NO! You'll pull and pull and suddenly the whole stairway will unravel like a cheap sweater and the whole house will collapse around you, because you used this plywood product.
post #385 of 2432
Lol,
post #386 of 2432
91B6B20C-362A-49E2-B5EA-65FCB954EAB9-7273-0000086050874D85.jpg

Cost effective....lol
post #387 of 2432
Dowels to be added...soon.
post #388 of 2432
My contractors just put in some matte charcoal 12x24 tile for the kitchen area of a rental studio I'm redoing. I'll take some photos after everything is done; it looks great.
post #389 of 2432
Look forward to checking it out.
post #390 of 2432
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

Anyone have any data on whether gas is now cheaper than electric for winter heat?

I can't find any. I have a carrier heat pump/furnace setup and cant decide what the break-off temp should be between both systems.

Considering I hear gas prices are at all time lows, I'm not sure its being reflected in utility bills.

Gas is not at all time lows. It is low, but I'd call it more a 10 year low if anything. Further, gas was even lower last year when the winter was mild since there was so much supply, inventories were at record highs, and gas producers had nowhere to put the gas. Couple that with a large chunk of supply being produced as a byproduct of liquids, and gas prices had a 1 handle per MM Btu at one point last year. That said, many LDCs may have hedged their supply through futures/forwards/swaps, and depending on their programs, what you pay now is likely a weighted average price of ther various hedges, some of which may have been put on two years or more ago. Depending on where you live, gas heat has GOT to be cheaper than electric since you are paying your local electric company to run gas through their plants at about 35% to 40% thermal efficiency only to lose another 6% to losses when they deliver it to you from their assets. If you live in an area where your local power company has a diversified portfolio, you will likely be getting power at a weighted average cost of whatever their fuel mix is. Of course, power companies may hedge their input costs as well, so same situation as the gas company. At the end of the day, over the next 5 years, I would expect your average heating costs to be lower from gas than electricity no question.
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