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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 240

post #3586 of 6446

I would really like a DIY security system instead of paying $50 a month for ADT.  I am hoping Nest comes out with something as their recent camera is pretty cool with motion detection and night vision.

post #3587 of 6446
Well, end of the second day. It's really starting to take shape and I'm very happy with what I designed so far.

post #3588 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Well, end of the second day. It's really starting to take shape and I'm very happy with what I designed so far.

Looks good, even at this stage you can see the design clearly and I really like the concept.
post #3589 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post

Anyone have any experience with DIY home security (e.g. Simplisafe, Scout, etc)? Simplisafe seems to have good reviews in general, but it's so damn ugly and doesn't integrate with other products.


I looked into the DIY security systems and the number one issue I had with them is that buglers usually know where the box is located due to noise or convenience (near a major exit) and all they need to do is smash it with a crowbar within 60 seconds and it kills the alarm.

Also, the local alarm company has an excellent reputation for being pretty bulletproof. The bad guys know that.

We have a system with a local alarm company where the control panels are separate from the actual system. If they smash the control box, the alarm still works. We also have "instant" alarm functions on side doors, such as the garage. There is no delay to turn off the alarm. When you open those doors the alarm rings instantly and it is very loud. We also have an external, large box, mounted outside on the second floor, marked with the name of the alarm company as an additional deterrent. You might look into these to see if DIY alarm systems that you are considering offer any of these features.
post #3590 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

I would really like a DIY security system instead of paying $50 a month for ADT.  I am hoping Nest comes out with something as their recent camera is pretty cool with motion detection and night vision.

$50 a month is too much to protect your property?
post #3591 of 6446
I get a pretty good discount on my house insurance because of my alarm system so the actual cost is reduced.
post #3592 of 6446
More progress.

post #3593 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
 

I would really like a DIY security system instead of paying $50 a month for ADT.  I am hoping Nest comes out with something as their recent camera is pretty cool with motion detection and night vision.

If you think $50 a month is expensive - the previous owner of my house was paranoid (he had to work nights and was worried about his wife being home alone), so he installed security shutters on all the sliding glass and windows. Theyre pretty nicely done (can't see when retracted), and at night we can literally lock the house down.

post #3594 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

If you think $50 a month is expensive - the previous owner of my house was paranoid (he had to work nights and was worried about his wife being home alone), so he installed security shutters on all the sliding glass and windows. Theyre pretty nicely done (can't see when retracted), and at night we can literally lock the house down.

 

Well I guess there is that end of the spectrum.  It's not that $50 is expensive, it is just that not much is offered for the money other than some monitoring.  There has to be something easier and better integrated than their big wall mounted box.

 

Looking good Piob.  I like the build out look.

post #3595 of 6446
It's a good thing we did this as apparently there was vermin living in the walls:




Now with the on drywall they cannot make the jump. The lowest shelf (left side) was placed six inches above the highest I've observed them able to jump. smile.gif


post #3596 of 6446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

It's a good thing we did this as apparently there was vermin living in the walls:




Now with the on drywall they cannot make the jump. The lowest shelf (left side) was placed six inches above the highest I've observed them able to jump. smile.gif



Damned cats.... Why are teb shelves different heights?!?!!?!?! Why why why why why why?
post #3597 of 6446
Okay, last pic until it's all done...or maybe just the last pic, not sure yet. You can get the real idea of where we're going now though. I feel like Skinny, even though I didn't actually build it, as I watch what I saw in my head get made.

post #3598 of 6446
Please do post a picture when it's all done and you fire it up!
post #3599 of 6446
So, I may be joining the ranks of homeownership.

I'll start off by saying that buying a house was a more long-term prospect for me prior to a unique opportunity arising. I'm fairly happy with my current urban neighborhood which allows me to walk to work in about 7 minutes, along with other amenities that can be reached on foot. I have a reasonable ($750) monthly rent payment for a mediocre and small 1BR apartment.

To cut to the chase: my father found a foreclosure in a desirable suburb that he would like to buy and fix up. After discussing it, we realized it would be a good fit for me for a few reasons:

-4.8 miles (13 minute drive, 20-25 minute bus ride) to the office;
-5 minute walk to the bus stop;
-1,100 square feet, a reasonable size for a single guy (IMO);
-Small yard, would require minimal maintenance;
-Walkable neighborhood.

Now, the house needs a lot of work. If we buy it, one foundation wall will need to be removed and re-poured. My father has done this on prior flips and knows a good contractor for the job. The home also needs a new roof and we would like to rip up the ugly old carpets, refinish the hardwood floors underneath, remodel the kitchen, and paint throughout.

After accounting for these expenses my father would be able to sell it to me at cost, which would be around $120k. Comparable homes in that town sell for $150-$175k. He calculated a ~$1,000 month mortgage including taxes and insurance, no PMI, on a $130K mortgage. Honestly, I think we can keep the cost under $120K if we are judicious with what we choose to renovate. The mortgage would be 19% of my monthly gross income, 28% of net. I find that to be a comfortable level but maybe you guys think differently.

I wouldn't really consider any other home at this stage in my life but the gift of instant equity and the reasonable mortgage have forced me to think. It's in a neighborhood I like and is small enough that it will require minimal upkeep. Also, taking care of the big problems during the reno could mitigate any Murphy's Law related incidents.

What do you guys think?
post #3600 of 6446
130k for a mortgage is nothing. Go for it.
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