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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 221

post #3301 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

Turk, wondering how that bearing got so rusted. That would suggest a leak somewhere, would it not?

I'd keep an eye on the washer if I were you. Bearing retention in a concentricity-sensitive application is a difficult issue, and I bet its at least part of the reason the mfg was hesitant to do or warrant the repair. Trust me, bearings, bearing retention bores, concentricity, and bearing noise in long-term applications is something I do every. single. day.

Lasted two years, and I got this:



The seal pretty obviously failed this time.

I'm getting pretty good at tearing down that washing machine--only about four hours from start to finish. Got a different seal from a different source this time and made sure to seat that sucker all the way down, then packed it with wheel bearing grease. It works for wheel bearings, so why not?
post #3302 of 5747


Painstakingly fitted three layers of R-3.2 1/2" foam to the 18' overhead door in my detached garage. None of the panels were the same size and all had to be composed of at least two pieces of foam to fit them in, the ones on the right, three pieces. Then I slid in some plastic wall sheets over it for a finished look. The pockets on this door were too large for the premade garage door insulation kits.

Total cost was about $150 for the materials with the liberal use of that Lowes $15 off $50 coupon. I don't even know how many 4x8 foam panels it took -- 12 or 13, plus 4.5 of the plastic sheets. Adds a lot of weight so I'll have to adjust the door springs at some point.
post #3303 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post



Painstakingly fitted three layers of R-3.2 1/2" foam to the 18' overhead door in my detached garage. None of the panels were the same size and all had to be composed of at least two pieces of foam to fit them in, the ones on the right, three pieces. Then I slid in some plastic wall sheets over it for a finished look. The pockets on this door were too large for the premade garage door insulation kits.

Total cost was about $150 for the materials with the liberal use of that Lowes $15 off $50 coupon. I don't even know how many 4x8 foam panels it took -- 12 or 13, plus 4.5 of the plastic sheets. Adds a lot of weight so I'll have to adjust the door springs at some point.

Why?
post #3304 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post


Why?

Eyeballing it, he has a wood working shop in the garage. I did the same think when I had my shop outside as well. otherwise it is really hard to motivate yourself to go out and work after October. 

post #3305 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post

Eyeballing it, he has a wood working shop in the garage. I did the same think when I had my shop outside as well. otherwise it is really hard to motivate yourself to go out and work after October. 

To give another reason, many modern home designs have the garage under inhabited space on the second floor. Thus, keeping the garage from fluctuating too much helps that room over the garage. (My master bedroom is over the garage in my home, as is many of my neighbors.)
post #3306 of 5747
I see. Make sure any gaps between the door and the floor and the door frame, and between the door panels, are rubber sealed. Putting insulation on the panels will do next to nothing if air can flow in and out.
post #3307 of 5747
The garage definitely can be partially conditioned space and I think there's real utility in insulating the door.

But this is a separate building from my house. I am insulating it because I plan to keep it climate controlled. Comfort is one reason, but another big one is humidity. Wood for furniture needs to be stored at humidity comparable to a house or it will warp when brought inside. There are also big temperature / humidity swings around here so condensation is a major issue too. Don't want all those nice cast iron tops and fine cutting tools to rust.

I would not have done so much insulation, but there just happened to be 1.5" pockets in the door so three layers fit perfectly. I'm going to go back and do the door on the garage on the house, too, but I may just glue in one layer. Three layers plus the plastic weighs a lot; I may need to replace the springs to have the door work properly.
post #3308 of 5747
Settling on a new place on Monday. The place is near perfect but it doesn't have those neat soft-close cabinet and drawers in the kitchen. How hard are those to DIY and anyone got a link to get an idea of cost?
post #3309 of 5747
I doubt it would be difficult. Depending on the style and size of the door you many only need to replace one of the hinges. Do you know who makes the hinges? Grass, Blum are common manufacturers and their hinges usually have adjustments for tension.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004K807JC/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687782&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B004K7V8UU&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0V6TNEK4J10WCKD6MD8J#productDetails
post #3310 of 5747
These would be an even easier option:

http://amzn.com/B00J9XB6BQ
post #3311 of 5747
I just installed the ones white/azn posted and they work well, very easy to install. Heavier doors may require two of them.

I have not yet found an affordable or easy solution to retro-fitting soft-close drawers, if anybody does please share.

Also Ikea has these that are even easier and cheaper, simply clip in. Not sure if they are Ikea-specific though; they clipped into my hinges just fine but was not long enough: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/80126213/
post #3312 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonick View Post

I just installed the ones white/azn posted and they work well, very easy to install. Heavier doors may require two of them.

I have not yet found an affordable or easy solution to retro-fitting soft-close drawers, if anybody does please share.

Also Ikea has these that are even easier and cheaper, simply clip in. Not sure if they are Ikea-specific though; they clipped into my hinges just fine but was not long enough: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/80126213/

A new set of soft close drawer slides are $20 at Home Depot. You just need to get the proper size and replace each set on the existing drawer. Bit of a pain but it can be done if it's that important to you.

I stumbled across them today (actually at Lowes) in stock when I was buying some door bumpers, so they are at the local stores.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-24-in-Soft-Close-Ball-Bearing-Full-Extension-Drawer-Slide-2-Pack-942405/205171306
post #3313 of 5747

we're renovating our attic as a master bed/bath, I wouldn't normally go for a dedicated bath but we've got a perfect space for a corner tub. Can anyone speak for or against certain brands? jetted, air or just soaker?

post #3314 of 5747

If you must have a tub, go soaker.  Unless used regularly and cleaned regularly, the pipes on jetted tubs hold mold and mildew so when you turn them on it ruins your bath.

post #3315 of 5747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

If you must have a tub, go soaker.  Unless used regularly and cleaned regularly, the pipes on jetted tubs hold mold and mildew so when you turn them on it ruins your bath.

Totally agree. Just tore out my jetted tub. Go without use for a couple of weeks and it needs to be filled and then circulated and drained before use. IMO not worth the hassle. Just installed this, which will also save some $$. Also, look for a spout with integrated spray wand. They come in very handy when using a soaking tub.


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