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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 220

post #3286 of 5750
crazy glue
post #3287 of 5750
Are the hinges, rollers, chain and rail all lubricated? Some of my neighbors doors sound like nails on a chalkboard.

Last week my unit had an issue with the circuit board section linked to the safety "eyes' With parts and call out I was looking at $250. For $450 had it all replaced with the new belt driven model. from Liftmaster/Chamberlain . So quiet.
post #3288 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPER K View Post

Are the hinges, rollers, chain and rail all lubricated? Some of my neighbors doors sound like nails on a chalkboard.

Last week my unit had an issue with the circuit board section linked to the safety "eyes' With parts and call out I was looking at $250. For $450 had it all replaced with the new belt driven model. from Liftmaster/Chamberlain . So quiet.

i think you are talking to me re: garage door, everything seems ok, not sure what the deal is.
post #3289 of 5750

Taking Thursday and Friday off work to start adding some insulation to the house.  First it will be the crawl space to insulate the floors then into the attic.  Hoping to at least get recessed lighting covers and rafter baffles installed then blow in insulation when I have some helping hands in town in 2 weeks.

 

My wife keeps bringing up putting in some retaining walls to level some areas for outdoor seating as our yard is sloped.  From what I can find online, it looks like a cinder block wall faced with natural stone then filled with dirt would be easiest.  The other option is digging out the sloped area but our yard is a graveyard of old tree roots that would be a major headache.

post #3290 of 5750
Installing new floors in the new apartment. This is turning into an expensive nightmare.

Any insight on solid vs. engineered wood in a pre-war NYC apartment with steam radiator heating?
post #3291 of 5750
I'd go with solid wood if you can. Heat can dry your floor out and cause excessive wood movement, but I wouldn't think it would be an issue if it's installed correctly. Those radiators have been around since before engineered floors existed.

Maybe research the particular species of wood you're planning to use to make sure it doesn't move excessively. Were the old floors damaged by the radiators?
post #3292 of 5750

Well insulating my crawl space was easy.  Just 4 hours worth of time and it is complete.  Next up is prepping the attic for more blown in insulation.  I am thinking total cost will be right around $1,000 which is not bad at all.  

post #3293 of 5750
does anyone have experience with pre 1800s homes and insulation? thanks in advance
post #3294 of 5750
Around here it's easy, as the answer is none.
post #3295 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Around here it's easy, as the answer is none.

not sure if this is directed towards me, but if it is, thevquestion is about adding attic insulation without a proper vapor barrier. there is blown in insulation installed already, but it is conservatively 20 years ol, dirty and compressed. I plan on removing it and replacing it with new stuff. what are the potential issues with just adding the new stuff?
post #3296 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Voorhees View Post


not sure if this is directed towards me, but if it is, thevquestion is about adding attic insulation without a proper vapor barrier. there is blown in insulation installed already, but it is conservatively 20 years ol, dirty and compressed. I plan on removing it and replacing it with new stuff. what are the potential issues with just adding the new stuff?


Shouldn't be much of a vapor issue unless there have been roof leaking issues.  I am adding rafter baffles for ventilation from the eaves for added peace of mind but other than that, nothing special.  Depending on your budget, I have heard the newer foam insulation sprays you can add help a lot but they are pretty expensive up front.  Our house would have been close to $10K for that alone.  We are in sort of the mid-south of the US and have quite a bit of shade from trees so I just wanted to add a little more at a lower cost.

post #3297 of 5750
How much should I spend on a new front door (frame and sidelight window)? I was just given an estimate of $3500+ (Canada).
post #3298 of 5750
It depends on the type of door, how big, if you're going custom, etc. You can easily get a pretty good fiberglass door installed for ~$1000 or less.
post #3299 of 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrifter View Post

How much should I spend on a new front door (frame and sidelight window)? I was just given an estimate of $3500+ (Canada).

At that price it should be mahogany. Sounds very high, unless you are talking about a lot of work to reframe + a high quality door.
post #3300 of 5750
It seems like a high quality door - hinges have ball bearings (yay?) and heavy duty aluminum flashings outside. But it still seems high so I'm going to get a few more quotes.
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