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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 207

post #3091 of 5811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

To each his own, I guess.

Lowes is going crazy with coupon codes. They have $50 off $250 and $15 off $50 (go to slickdeals forums to find the codes). I'm trying to think of something I still need.

In case you're not aware, generally HD will accept Lowe's coupon if there is something there you want.

I generally prefer Lowe's though. I have a Menards and two HD within 5 minutes of me, but I find myself driving the 15 minutes to Lowe's.
post #3092 of 5811
HD will take real, official, printed-by-Lowes coupons, but I don't know how to get them to take the online coupon codes, especially since the online Lowes coupons are kind of a gray area. They're theoretically individually numbered and one-time use. But only a few of the numbers are operative, so you can change the others to use a given code as many times as you want. It's been like that for years, and surely Lowes knows what people are doing.

My local Home Depot will take Harbor Freight 20% off coupons, at least if you get the right manager (remind them that their sign says "We accept ANY competitor's coupons." I haven't tried to push them much, because I doubt it's a winning argument when it comes down to it, but I've managed to save some real money on a few big tools that way.
post #3093 of 5811
Project season getting into swing!

Plumbing projects:

Had the plumber out today to mark up for drywall removal leading up to re-pipe. Drywall guy is coming out on Wednesday, then hopefully plumber back shortly thereafter. Going to have a new toilet put in downstairs as the one down there doesn't flush properly. Currently there is only 1 hose bib on the front side of the house (on one corner) which makes watering things on the far side of the house a major PITA, so I'm having another hose bib installed on the opposite corner. Doing this will mean cutting open the ceiling of the living room downstairs, however, I'm going to take that opportunity to blow in some sound-reducing insulation between the upstairs and downstairs living rooms before the drywall guy patches everything back up.

Electrical:

Electrical coming out on March 9th. Having TV hookups etc run to the wall of the living room that my TV will be on eventually. Also,I'm having outdoor outlets installed at various points, as well as a "porch" light over the entry door to the downstairs apartment (I have an apartment downstairs that I rent to my brother). In addition, while we're adding exterior outlets, I'm going to run power to another project of mine. . .

Patio:

Having a 20'x20' patio poured in my side/front yard. The only thing I wish my house had is outdoor space, so I'm just going to bit the bullet and make it happen. There is no real ideal place at my house - the backyard isn't really big enough plus there is no back door but I think I've figured out the best possible place. Going to run power up through where the pad will be poured so I have easily plug in stereo equipment, lighting, etc. SO SO looking forward to BBQing and smoking cigars on my patio later in the summer. After the patio is poured I'm going to have to fence the front side of the house to add privacy. Thinking maybe a 3.5 or 4 foot tall fence with an arbor over top (at least on the part near the patio) that I can plant/landscape around so that it gives a bit of privacy to the patio without blocking off too much of the house and making it look like a fortress.
post #3094 of 5811

Our re-pipe is almost done after a week of nothing due to weather.  Had an electrical guy out for a walkthrough to see what is up to code and what it will cost to run some new lights/outlets.  Some basic items but then some with ridiculous pricing.  For 9 wireless smoke detectors they want to charge $998!  2 carbon monoxide detectors are $155.  

 

After I wade through the BS, the wiring conversion from some old cloth covered wiring, install some outlets, and install some lighting does not seem too bad but I really don't know what things should cost or when I am getting ripped off.  Google can only help so much.

post #3095 of 5811
Are hard wired detectors code? Cause you can buy some battery ones for like $10
post #3096 of 5811
I stayed at a friend's place a few months ago who had the entire house wired with these types of detectors, she was away for a few months. When I arrived the place was beeping to all hell. One of the batteries went dead and all 6 detectors were beeping non-stop. Took forever to figure out which one of the units actually had the dead battery.
post #3097 of 5811

The summary says wireless detectors are code.  We currently have battery operated that aren't connected but if one goes off, we will surely hear it as our house echoes quite a bit.

post #3098 of 5811
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

Our re-pipe is almost done after a week of nothing due to weather.  Had an electrical guy out for a walkthrough to see what is up to code and what it will cost to run some new lights/outlets.  Some basic items but then some with ridiculous pricing.  For 9 wireless smoke detectors they want to charge $998!  2 carbon monoxide detectors are $155.  

After I wade through the BS, the wiring conversion from some old cloth covered wiring, install some outlets, and install some lighting does not seem too bad but I really don't know what things should cost or when I am getting ripped off.  Google can only help so much.

Do you know which models they are quoting you for and how much labor per unit is required? Shouldn't be too much if they are wireless. I had wired Nest Protects installed...man they are annoying if you change your wifi.
post #3099 of 5811

I do not know what units are being quoted but they seem to range from $30-$50 for basic units unless you purchase Nest units which are $99 each.  I don't think the company will shell out a ton of money on units but it seems like there is a flat rate fee per smoke detector.  

 

I will have to look into the Nest alarms though.  I didn't know they had a battery powered option...

post #3100 of 5811
You aren't required to comply with modern code, only whatever was the code at the time your house was built (official phrase is legal nonconforming). Battery powered detectors are fine, I see no reason to hire an electrician for something you could do yourself for less than $100.
post #3101 of 5811
Quote:
Originally Posted by js0930 View Post

You aren't required to comply with modern code, only whatever was the code at the time your house was built (official phrase is legal nonconforming). Battery powered detectors are fine, I see no reason to hire an electrician for something you could do yourself for less than $100.

I don't think that is necessarily true. If we go to sell our house, the city comes out and does an inspection. If they find code violations, they prevent us from selling until we fix them.
post #3102 of 5811
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I don't think that is necessarily true. If we go to sell our house, the city comes out and does an inspection. If they find code violations, they prevent us from selling until we fix them.

Where do you live? I've never heard of that.
post #3103 of 5811
And beyond that, do those inspections demand that say 1910 houses comply with modern code in every way? Because I find that a little hard to believe.
post #3104 of 5811
Quote:
Originally Posted by js0930 View Post

Where do you live? I've never heard of that.

I live in a suburb of Minneapolis, but most of the metro area does it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by js0930 View Post

And beyond that, do those inspections demand that say 1910 houses comply with modern code in every way? Because I find that a little hard to believe.

Every way? No. As an example, my house had original siding from the 50's, so it didn't have a vapor barrier underneath and tested positive for lead-based paint which was allowed. However, when we bought the house, there was some plumbing in the kitchen that wasn't up to code, and the city required the previous owner to fix it before it could be sold.
post #3105 of 5811
Code stuff varies from state to state and locality to locality. You can't generalize. Just ask your local authorities what the deal is.
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