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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 195

post #2911 of 5805
They started residing my house today, or more accurately started tearing off the old siding. As expected, there is no vapor barrier and there is some serious rot to the garage, and they are going to need to replace the underlayment. Additionally, which was not expected, they found out the roof on the garage was not done correctly. They can take a shortcut and be okay, they think it will cause water damage overtime and ruin the siding, so new roof on the garage too!
post #2912 of 5805

Have what sounds like a water leak in a wall not near pipes.  A dripping sound can be heard when the toilet is flushed but then it trails off.  I tried tracing the pipes in the basement and stand where the drip sound is while my wife flushed the toilet but I can't see or feel any water from the pipes.  Very odd.  

 

Have someone coming out Thursday to check on this as well as another random dripping sound.  I assume water leaks behind drywall end up costing $$$.  Hopefully nothing too serious...

post #2913 of 5805
Had a similar situation happen two weeks before my wedding (Murphy's law no doubt). Cost me about $150 to fix, since I did the work (remove and replace a section of the ceiling along with repairing the pipe and replacing some fittings) that included some work on the outside of the house and some woodwork as well.

All depends on what's involved and what's leaking.
post #2914 of 5805
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Had a similar situation happen two weeks before my wedding (Murphy's law no doubt). Cost me about $150 to fix, since I did the work (remove and replace a section of the ceiling along with repairing the pipe and replacing some fittings) that included some work on the outside of the house and some woodwork as well.

All depends on what's involved and what's leaking.

 

I wish I had more experience with plumbing and drywall as I would go exploring.  An additional thought is that only the toilet creates the sound.  Showers and faucet usage do not recreate the drip.  If I can get out of this for under $1,000 I would be happy.  That should then fix all of the little things the house has had since we moved in and we can save for bigger projects.

post #2915 of 5805
Siding is almost done, and it looks great!
post #2916 of 5805
What are some of the best websites for DIY guides or videos?

I assume youtube has a lot of stuff, but there is no filter for people who know what they're doing vs. people who don't.



My interests range from basic electrical (replacing outdoor sconces without getting killed) to sheetrock & patching sheetrock to trim & mouldings, etc.



Contractor is redoing 50% of my house there are some things I'd like to address later myself.
post #2917 of 5805
Best advice I can give would be to watch several youtube videos and use your common sense to decide who's giving the best advice. Read the comments. I've never found a good all-in-one source for that kind of thing. The guides published by magazines are mostly useless.
post #2918 of 5805

Don't Home Depot and Lowe's offer free courses on weekends?  Basic wiring is easy as I have replaced light fixtures both inside and outside.  Having the necessary tools makes it a hell of a lot easier.  Drywall and such seem like a PITA

post #2919 of 5805
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

I wish I had more experience with plumbing and drywall as I would go exploring.  An additional thought is that only the toilet creates the sound.  Showers and faucet usage do not recreate the drip.  If I can get out of this for under $1,000 I would be happy.  That should then fix all of the little things the house has had since we moved in and we can save for bigger projects.

Figure if someone were billing me per hour for the work I did myself, it would have likely came close to $1000 before re-painting. I always receive f-u pricing when requesting small jobs, which is why I decided to tackle drywall and paint for myself. I do a type 4 prep, which is something most contractors will not generally do unless requested specifically. For really bad drywall I do type 5 to get it totally smooth.

I have a lot of bucket ceiling lights in my house, which show every minor uneven area in drywall, so I had to get good at it to do anything worth painting over.

Proper tools get you half way there if you already have mechanical ability, and all I needed was to review a few videos on YouTube. Three rooms later and one redo and I am producing work which has held up well over time without noticeable uneven areas when light shining across it.

I use eggshell paint, so it's not the easiest thing in the world to achieve but it's not reserved entirely for professionals.

I've painted three big rooms for about $500~ Using regal from Benjamin Moore, Quotes were thousands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

What are some of the best websites for DIY guides or videos?

I assume youtube has a lot of stuff, but there is no filter for people who know what they're doing vs. people who don't.



My interests range from basic electrical (replacing outdoor sconces without getting killed) to sheetrock & patching sheetrock to trim & mouldings, etc.



Contractor is redoing 50% of my house there are some things I'd like to address later myself.
post #2920 of 5805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Best advice I can give would be to watch several youtube videos and use your common sense to decide who's giving the best advice. Read the comments. I've never found a good all-in-one source for that kind of thing. The guides published by magazines are mostly useless.

+1

when I'm about to undertake a project I generally research for quite a while, read, watch youtube videos etc. Once you actually start on the project you will probably have additional questions or a uncommon situation which will require additional research, but IMO the initial round is still needed just so that you can get a holistic idea of what you're doing and how it should go.
post #2921 of 5805
Down here in the south, almost all "nice" lawns seem to be Raleigh St Augustine.

It looks fine, but it feels awful compared to the thinner softer grasses up north that I'm used to. I'm toying with the idea of switching my yard to Zoysia. Would be expensive to just re-sod the whole thing, but on the interwebs it says you can use plugs and let them outcompete the St Augustine over time too.

Of course there's always the reseeding option also, but then you have to start with and deal with bare dirt.

Any gone through lawn grass type switches?

I probably won't bother, but the idea of softer prettier Zoysia is nice.
post #2922 of 5805

I didn't switch types but just reseeded the yard.  I went the route of slowly switching from whatever crap we currently have to Kentucky XX, whatever that number is.

 

Just got the bad news from the plumber.  Whole house is on cast iron and brass piping other than some of the copper piping we are seeing in various areas.  Getting an estimate for a whole house re-piping as we speak.  shit.

post #2923 of 5805
Estimate will be eleventy billion $. Are you sure you need to change from your existing pipes?


We are almost done having half our house switched from "knob and tube" to modern electrical (idiot previous owners only switched the kitchen area and additions). It costs eleventy billion $.
post #2924 of 5805
Adding recessed lighting and dimmers all over the place is a huge major upgrade in goodness though.
post #2925 of 5805
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

I didn't switch types but just reseeded the yard.  I went the route of slowly switching from whatever crap we currently have to Kentucky XX, whatever that number is.

Just got the bad news from the plumber.  Whole house is on cast iron and brass piping other than some of the copper piping we are seeing in various areas.  Getting an estimate for a whole house re-piping as we speak.  shit.

If you're handy at all, you might want to look at redoing it yourself. Shark bite fittings are really easy to use and the amount of money you save could be spent on parts of the house you'll actually see.
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