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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 184

post #2746 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I enjoyed reading the preceding 30-40 posts but this talk always leaves me so confused and conflicted.

My work here is done. tongue.gif
post #2747 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

I'll take some photos some time.
One of the restorers I know, who's also a cabinet maker, does proper french polishing but says it's a real bitch because his workshop generally has loads of saw dust floating around in the air, which is your worst enemy when french polishing. So he has to spring clean the place, then do nothing at all in there for a while to let everything settle, before he can start polishing. I guess all that gets worked into the price.
He's got some nice stuff. Just about having an eye for what your clients will like. Being able to take a decent photo helps. This is another I like - http://www.milesgriffithsantiques.co.uk/

Most certainly, it dries rather quickly, but I imagine the result of a light breeze flowing through the shop would bring tears to your eyes when you see the dust speckles on your work, especially at the final burnishing stage.

I've tried my hand at it, and while I did have some success I found it to be a hellish process.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I enjoyed reading the preceding 30-40 posts but this talk always leaves me so confused and conflicted.

Design is one of those things, IMO, that the aesthetic you enjoy is something that will be tough to deviate from even as you become confused by trend.

As far as I attempt to go I always wind up right back where I started. Enjoying what first became enjoyable to me.
post #2748 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Design is one of those things, IMO, that the aesthetic you enjoy is something that will be tough to deviate from even as you become confused by trend.

As far as I attempt to go I always wind up right back where I started. Enjoying what first became enjoyable to me.

It's much more complicated, at least for me, than a simple aesthetic of one piece or another. It's trying to decide how the house, local geography and culture, and all the various interior components work together, and most importantly for me, are they functional above all comfortable? It often seems comfort and style do not readily intermix.
post #2749 of 5753
I refinished a walnut dresser with shellac a while back. I don't have much to add except, yeah, it's a lot of work. If you're worried about dust you can get 1 mil plastic very cheap and set up your own temporary spray booth.
post #2750 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

It's much more complicated, at least for me, than a simple aesthetic of one piece or another. It's trying to decide how the house, local geography and culture, and all the various interior components work together, and most importantly for me, are they functional above all comfortable? It often seems comfort and style do not readily intermix.

I am uncomfortable being in a room with ugly things, so comfort is relative.
post #2751 of 5753
For anyone interested, I have posted a photo of the regency chest in the antiques thread.
post #2752 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I am uncomfortable being in a room with ugly things, so comfort is relative.

I think "ugly" and "beautiful" create a spectrum and comfort just seems to be harder to find the more along the spectrum one moves towards beautiful (or whatever synonym you want to use there). As we're going to be getting our interior set up in the next 18 months I think about this a lot. I don't have any answers for myself but I think about it.

For instance, in what will be our TV/usual sitting room I need an ottoman as I like to sit with my feet up due to my bad knee. Is an ottoman that sees daily use inherently not attractive? Should it match the chair or compliment the chair? No idea.

While I do not experience much in the way of angst as to how others will view what we do I do have a little about how I'm going to view the end result.
post #2753 of 5753
There are plenty of good looking things that are comfortable. This is an enjoyable process when it is not made to be complicated.

Keep it simple, don't over think it.
post #2754 of 5753
I have sat on one or two really uncomfortable sofas and may be a few chairs in my entire life. Unless you suffer from a medical condition rendering most furniture uncomfortable I have no clue why you give it so much thought.
post #2755 of 5753
You can tell whether or not something is comfortable within the first 30 seconds in the shop.
post #2756 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

I have sat on one or two really uncomfortable sofas and may be a few chairs in my entire life. Unless you suffer from a medical condition rendering most furniture uncomfortable I have no clue why you give it so much thought.

I have sat on a number of uncomfortable sofas. My least favorite type are the ones with nothing but toss pillows on the back, as you always end up uncomfortable and/or sliding between pillows, and couches with an overlong bottom such that one's feet cannot make comfortable contact with the floor. As to why I give it so much thought: they are a multi-year investment and one I need to live with on a daily basis. I cannot think of something that deserves more thought than something I'll use on a daily basis and have to live with for an extended amount of time.
post #2757 of 5753
My in-laws have sofas with a very upright back and they're covered in some god awful slippery cloth. I genuinely struggle not to slide off them sometimes. You basically have to sit prim and upright on them, or slide onto the floor.
post #2758 of 5753
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

My in-laws have sofas with a very upright back and they're covered in some god awful slippery cloth. You basically have to sit prim and upright on them, .........
How British of them....satisfied.gif
post #2759 of 5753
Poor guy just asked where he could get a dining table on the cheap. The answer's craigslist by the way, or, at least, anything but new. The markup on new furniture is extreme--right up there with printer ink and liquor at restaurants.

For $3k you can get something really nice with a few scratches so you won't feel bad about the first ones you put on it. And if your tastes change (or evolve) you should be able to get about what you paid for it.
post #2760 of 5753
High street clothing is much much worse than furniture, when it comes to mark ups.
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