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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 158

post #2356 of 5785
I've got these heirlooms in the ground
http://www.rareseeds.com/aunt-rubys-german-green-tomato/
http://www.rareseeds.com/black-krim-tomato/
http://www.rareseeds.com/costoluto-genovese-tomato/
I'm more interested in flavor than yield. I have 4 of each so yield shouldn't be a problem either.

I have a central vac that appears to be original to the house ('76) and it sucks quite hard. You can still hear it a little bit in the garage but I'm sure a modern one would be quieter.
post #2357 of 5785
About half of mine are heirlooms -- heirloom really just means open-pollinated, that the plant was produced by one like it and will produce offspring that are true to it. They come in so many different shapes and sizes because they're inbred monstrosities, not because there's anything special about heirloom plants. They have inferior disease resistance and vitality because there are some traits you can't reliably get without crossing two different plants. An analogy would be something like light brown eyes in humans. Pretty much everybody who has them has the recessive trait for blue eyes, meaning that if two of them get together, only half their kids will have light brown eyes; a quarter will be blue and a quarter darker brown. (Actually eye color is more complicated than that, but it's meant to be an illustration not a literal example).

That being said "heirloom" tomatoes often taste different, or better, for a variety of reasons. One is that they have some archaic features that were bred out of commercial tomatoes that do make them taste better (thinner skins, green shoulders, etc.). They're often ripened mostly on the vine while commercial tomatoes are picked green and ripened with chemicals. That helps. Not refrigerated -- that's a big deal. A big thing is also that they're often grown on plants that are stressed -- by disease, malnutrition, drought. Believe it or not a lot of people think that makes tomatoes taste better. Maybe it does.

So all that being said, about half my plants are heirlooms. A couple "Homstead 24," which is just a boring red tomato that does well in the heat, a couple "Cherokee Purple," a "Mr. Stripey." Maybe a few more I'm forgetting.
post #2358 of 5785
How do they taste those tomatoes? I am speculating if they are simply old-fashion hybrid plants then not much differenet from a regular tomatoe, but what about genetically modded? Do they taste anything like fresh tomatoe juice or do they taste like watery substance?

On slightly different topic: Porcelaine electric switches by Fontini: http://www.portalelectricidad.com/tienda/interruptores-enchufes-c-30.html
Edited by Medwed - 6/16/14 at 7:10am
post #2359 of 5785
There are not, as far as I know, any genetically modified tomatoes in circulation.

The taste does vary between the various types, though not dramatically. Some are more acidic, some sweeter, some taste kind of salty. There are different textures and slightly different smells. I'm not a connoisseur so I'm sure others can do a better job describing it.

One thing I have noticed, though, is that most people -- even the ones who enjoy variety -- prefer traditional red, acidic tomatoes. That's why I've got a mix (another reason is that the best red hybrids mature faster, staggering production). There's a lot of improvement from the garden over the store, for the various reasons I touched on above.
post #2360 of 5785
Spent a couple of hours saturday doing some weeding for my parents - holy shit forgot how much work that could be. Any recommendations for plants to use as ground cover to discourage more weeds? COnsidering ground ivy, sedum angelina, and creeping thyme. Will probably use two out of the three depending on the area.
post #2361 of 5785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joffrey View Post

Spent a couple of hours saturday doing some weeding for my parents - holy shit forgot how much work that could be. Any recommendations for plants to use as ground cover to discourage more weeds? COnsidering ground ivy, sedum angelina, and creeping thyme. Will probably use two out of the three depending on the area.

I don't like ground ivy because, depending on the type, it can grow pretty low and start taking over the actual grass or choking out desirable perennials you might have. However, if it's a heavily shaded area and you don't have much grass or flowers to begin with, the ivy can work pretty well.

I think it's considered an invasive species in some areas but I use "winter creeper" and "snow on the mountain" in areas around trees and in a couple of beds. They can tolerate pretty harsh conditions and grow tall enough that you can still have a pretty clear delineation between the lawn and the beds. I've found that they are also easier to control than most ground ivy so that they won't choke out perennials, hosta, azaleas...

Not exactly a ground cover but another option are daylilies. There are tons of different varieties but I've found the orange ones (I have no clue what their proper name is) spread pretty quickly if it's a nice sunny spot, don't require a lot of watering, keep blooming throughout most of the summer, and grow thick enough to stop most weeds and look nice and green even when not blooming. You may want to clear away the dead stuff each fall or spring though so the bed looks a bit neater.


Not my photo, but this is the variety I mean.
post #2362 of 5785
Ground ivy never goes away. I have to kill that shit every year. I had it choke out some evergreen shrubs. I killed my entire yard with kill all vegetation stuff, but those ivy still keep coming back 4 years later.

Daylillys will multiply faster than rabbits if you let them, but they won't typically murder your other plants.
post #2363 of 5785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Dunno.

In a similar vein, I gave away a bunch of my extra plants, including one to a yuppie lawyer. She was really proud of her tomatoes but crushed when I explained why they weren't "organic." Shoulda used chicken shit and ground up animal parts instead of miracle gro, honey!

Also saw this recently, where the author explains how a popular "natural" weed killer organic growers use is actually far more toxic than roundup.
Quote:
Let’s do one more calculation to put these toxicity numbers into perspective. Male rats can weigh up to 500 g, or 0.5 kg. One gallon of the homemade mixture contains 198,200 mg of acetic acid, or approximately enough to kill 59 rats, if administered orally. One gallon of mixed glyphosate solution contains 31,752 mg glyphosate, or enough to kill 6 rats. The acetic acid in the homemade mixture is nearly 10 times more lethal than the glyphosate in the Eliminate mixture. And this doesn’t include the salt.

How could this be, you ask? Everything you’ve read on the internet says glyphosate is causing ailments from autism to obesity. How could glyphosate be less toxic than vinegar? Truth is, it is easy to make a chemical (any chemical) sound pretty nasty, even if you use verifiable, factual information. For example, sodium chloride, one of the ingredients in the homemade herbicide solution, is mutagenic for mammalian somatic cells and bacteria. Another ingredient, acetic acid, is highly corrosive, can aggravate respiratory disorders, and even cause permanent vision loss. Does this sound like something you want to be spraying in the same yard where your children and pets play? Should you be dousing your yard with a potent chemical cocktail that causes mutations in humans and causes blindness? And now we learn that this chemical cocktail is nearly 10 times more lethal to mammals than glyphosate, one of the most potent weed killers on the planet! If you’re less scrupulous about your sources, you can even find links between acetic acid and a multitude of disorders, including eczema, psoriasis, shingles, and herpes. You read that right; THIS HOMEMADE HERBICIDE MIXTURE MIGHT GIVE YOU HERPES!

This part is also fun:
Quote:
Maybe you’re not worried about the safety aspect; you simply don’t want to purchase Roundup because you dislike Monsanto. Well, don’t forget that vinegar is often made from corn, and most corn in the US has the Roundup Ready trait (which was developed by Monsanto). So the vinegar you are using to spray your weeds is probably made from corn that was sprayed with glyphosate: the very herbicide you were trying to avoid.

http://weedcontrolfreaks.com/2014/06/salt-vinegar-and-glyphosate/

 

The stupid, it hurts.

post #2364 of 5785

"Lemon Boy" (hybrid) and "Cherokee Purple" (heirloom).

The Lemon Boy is more orange than it should be, I think. Not sure why.
post #2365 of 5785
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

The stupid, it hurts.

Is that directed at me, the folks who advocate "natural" weed killers, or just a present sense impression?
post #2366 of 5785
Directed at the idiot who came up with that turd of a logical fallacy.
post #2367 of 5785
I hate to keep pressing you, but, you know, there's a lot of arguments in the post. Which is the fallacy?
post #2368 of 5785
Thanks for the responses. It's not on the lawn actually. It's in a large garden bed that is elevated and blocked by bricks from the lawn grass. It is not presently populated with other plants (apart from an herb garden set off to the side). So I think the only issue would be periodic edging to keep the plant from getting onto the lawn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michigan Planner View Post

I don't like ground ivy because, depending on the type, it can grow pretty low and start taking over the actual grass or choking out desirable perennials you might have. However, if it's a heavily shaded area and you don't have much grass or flowers to begin with, the ivy can work pretty well.

I think it's considered an invasive species in some areas but I use "winter creeper" and "snow on the mountain" in areas around trees and in a couple of beds. They can tolerate pretty harsh conditions and grow tall enough that you can still have a pretty clear delineation between the lawn and the beds. I've found that they are also easier to control than most ground ivy so that they won't choke out perennials, hosta, azaleas...

Not exactly a ground cover but another option are daylilies. There are tons of different varieties but I've found the orange ones (I have no clue what their proper name is) spread pretty quickly if it's a nice sunny spot, don't require a lot of watering, keep blooming throughout most of the summer, and grow thick enough to stop most weeds and look nice and green even when not blooming. You may want to clear away the dead stuff each fall or spring though so the bed looks a bit neater.


Not my photo, but this is the variety I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

Ground ivy never goes away. I have to kill that shit every year. I had it choke out some evergreen shrubs. I killed my entire yard with kill all vegetation stuff, but those ivy still keep coming back 4 years later.

Daylillys will multiply faster than rabbits if you let them, but they won't typically murder your other plants.
post #2369 of 5785
The container experiment is still going well, though I have been getting drought stress and what appears to be nutrient deficiency. So I laid down $20 for a second irrigation controller that can do 8 starts per day for the drippers. For the nutrients apparently what the cool kids do is get a fertilizer injector for the drip system to continuously feed liquid fertilizer [since granules are dependent on top watering to release fertilizer]. The good injectors ones will set you back $250+ [and of course water-soluble or liquid fertilizer is more expensive].
post #2370 of 5785
things rolling a bit here at Casa RL.

Last of the front-of-the-house windows going in as I type.
Living/Dining paint turned out well! - still some trim work to do.
Mulched garden beds and continuing to plant things out front.
Built a 8' x16' x18" raised bed for vegetables - just got the veggies in over the weekend. I was not looking forward to shoveling the 7 yards of dirt to fill the planter, but I manged to talk the work crew (they are tearing up the street in front of my house) to use the front end loader and make short work of it!

Just ordered ceiling fans for living room and bedroom - will have ceiling fans installed as well as recessed lighting for the living room in the next couple weeks.
Still need to buy a washer/dryer set for the newly plumbed upstairs laundry room.
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