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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 128

post #1906 of 2459
Thanks.

Heres most of the pics. Pain to transfer thrm over on my phone smile.gifWarning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
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post #1907 of 2459
If you have a choice between engineered and solid wood, go with solid wood. But if you're installing on concrete you really don't.

The aluminum oxide finish on engineered wood is much harder than any finish you can apply after a floor is installed, so engineered wood is pretty darn durable. But you really can't sand it much (depends on the wear layer), so your options for refinishing are limited. You're unlikely to wear through the wood layer by walking on it or dropping something, though.
post #1908 of 2459
Does it get a patina as it ages though? Or does it just start to look old-and-busted-up?
post #1909 of 2459
No one here uses real hardwood. I'm not 100% sure why, something with humidityand expansion (which I thought we basically didn't have in AZ so i dont get the concern). Will be over concrete though so that settles it.
post #1910 of 2459
It stays looking new longer, so damage is more conspicuous, yeah. And it's intended to eventually be replaced. You'll never see someone boasting about 100-year-old engineered wood floors.
post #1911 of 2459
I like the charm of tung oiled wood floors after some use.

Some of the engineered floors have a 5/16" thick wear layer, I don't see that wearing out without a great many resurfacings.
post #1912 of 2459
I wouldn't be surprised if such a thing exists, but most engineered wood floors are only 3/8" thick, total, with the wear layer (IIRC) just 2mm.

I suppose you could prefer thicker wood, but it's nice to have the floor flush with the rest of the house and not have to trim doorjambs, remove moulding, etc.
post #1913 of 2459
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I'm contemplating this for my basement also and my plan is vapor barrier, plywood then engineered flooring.

This. It steals a 1/2 of height from the room but is pretty efficient, the cold from the floor doesn't transmit.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I like the charm of tung oiled wood floors after some use.

Some of the engineered floors have a 5/16" thick wear layer, I don't see that wearing out without a great many resurfacings.

I have tung oil. I'd never use poly-type products again. They make the floor look like plastic.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I wouldn't be surprised if such a thing exists, but most engineered wood floors are only 3/8" thick, total, with the wear layer (IIRC) just 2mm.

I suppose you could prefer thicker wood, but it's nice to have the floor flush with the rest of the house and not have to trim doorjambs, remove moulding, etc.

Why not consider reclaimed solid boards?

Are you talking about pre-finished engineered? Those look super cheap.
post #1914 of 2459
Lol.. just talked to my dad. Told me to get a quote for having floating floor installed plain.gif

Some of the textured engineered woods do look really cheap, but I find the smooth ones (not pergo smooth of course) aren't nearly as bad.
post #1915 of 2459

I have this in my place: http://www.palodurohardwoods.com/product-lines/hallmark-hardwoods

 

lefty

post #1916 of 2459
So next question, what color do you guys think works in this space? Door and blinds are dark, don't think that matters though? Seems like lighter color would lend itself better to the tile and walls.
post #1917 of 2459
If you are married to the wall color and want to keep the blinds I think the lightest wood that would look good would be red oak or natural cherry. I personally avoid rustic red toned woods like red oak and cherry because I feel they dictate the entire tone of your house and practically require darker colors for everything else.

Walnut will look out of place in conjunction with a heavy amount of red-toned woods.

If you want to go with a blonde wood like white oak, white ash, beech or maple than I think you'll have to consider white for the walls and changing the blinds to white linen roller shades.
post #1918 of 2459
How common is engineered wood flooring in construction these days?
post #1919 of 2459
I imagine it's very common anywhere houses are built on concrete slabs. Solid wood expands and contracts too much to be glued to them reliably.
post #1920 of 2459
Don't care about shades, but that's what's in the whole house, so could be a big expense. Color is Benjamin Moore HC-33, much less yellow in natural light and without my shit photography. It's on a lot of walls... so I don't really want to change that. Are you saying dark would work better? I really like dark woods, just wasn't sure how well it would match.
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