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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 110

post #1636 of 5809
Thread Starter 
We had (errr, still have) an old Victorian built 1879 with the original windows and no foundation and no insulation and a shitty old oil furnace.

We definitely burned through an $800 oil tank in a month before.
post #1637 of 5809
Also, I bought some pretty decent used maple cabinets from an architectural salvage place a couple weeks ago. Getting the floor plan set has been kind of arduous, as I only have the cabinets I have, so no flexibility, and the rough-ins are where they are and the range has to go a specific place because the hood vent is already cut.

I was stressing about there being awkward spaces like, 1 inch between the cabinets and the range,for example, and no way to order spacer strips or anything as the cabinets are used. I finally realized that I can cannibalize the extra cabinets for spacer strips etc. The set has more pieces than will fit down there, so I'm glad I do have a little flexibility now.
post #1638 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

Carbon footprint be damned!

This comment disqualifies you from any future discussion of global warming.
post #1639 of 5809
I'm afraid of what our bills will be this winter in the new house. We have 2 furnaces one for the upstairs and one for the downstairs. Not surprisingly the one downstairs seems to run a lot more. The only good news is that they aren't too too old. I think they were bought in 97.
post #1640 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

This comment disqualifies you from any future discussion of global warming.

Oh yeah?
post #1641 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I think the highest heating bill we have ever had is ~$150, and we live in a 50's house, but when it gets cold, we just put more clothes on.

We're in a 50's era rambler as well- not large - our bills were similar keeping the house at 64 in the winter. We have a new HE furnace that's really helped...
post #1642 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

We're in a 50's era rambler as well- not large - our bills were similar keeping the house at 64 in the winter. We have a new HE furnace that's really helped...

Yeah, my heater doesn't seem to be the greatest - looks to be installed in the early 90's and the little bit of ductwork visible in the basement is not very well done.

Thankfully my brother is finishing up his associates in HVAC repair and installation, and he has a job at an HVAC installer, so we're going to replace the system and the ducts in the spring.
post #1643 of 5809
It is remarkable how much you can save on heating by putting new weather stripping around all your doors. Be sure and get the bottom. I saved over $150 a month after doing this last year and I live in a moderate climate.

Turn it down a few degrees.

Keep your chimney flue closed when not in use. (that can really sucks air). Even better, get a glass front with a good seal around it.

As mentioned earlier, a thermostat with a timer allows you to enjoy a warm house when you wake, cuts the heat while at work and then heats up again before you get home.

Buy his and hers cozy throws for your den.
post #1644 of 5809
What are these "heaters" you people talk about?
post #1645 of 5809
I have been lucky in all of the homes I have purchased over the years. Our first in Portland we sold about 1 year before the housing bubble burst. Our second we sold for a slight profit. Our third we sold 6 months ago after listing it for one month sold after owning it for one year and we sold it for $20k more than we bought it for. This house...it's too early to tell.

We dodged a big bullet two years ago we tried to buy a house that needed a lot of work...an 1890s home that needed a remodel. The sellers wouldn't budge on their price so we bought the home we lived in for one year.
post #1646 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

It is remarkable how much you can save on heating by putting new weather stripping around all your doors. Be sure and get the bottom. I saved over $150 a month after doing this last year and I live in a moderate climate.

Turn it down a few degrees.

Keep your chimney flue closed when not in use. (that can really sucks air). Even better, get a glass front with a good seal around it.

As mentioned earlier, a thermostat with a timer allows you to enjoy a warm house when you wake, cuts the heat while at work and then heats up again before you get home.

Buy his and hers cozy throws for your den.

Should be noted however that it is generally more fuel efficient to keep the heat on, but set to a lower level, even when you're out at work. It uses more energy to heat the whole place up from cold then to just kick it up two or three degrees. Our thermostat keeps a minimum of 16 celsius, but heats up to 18/19 in the hours that we're in, and we use less energy then we would if we just switched it off completely when we're out.

Also good to have the ability to set separate temps in different rooms. Bedrooms for example, can be kept cooler.
post #1647 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

Should be noted however that it is generally more fuel efficient to keep the heat on, but set to a lower level, even when you're out at work.

It really isn't--the rate of heat loss is going to decrease as the difference in temperature between inside and outside decreases. Keeping the temperature in your house up keeps the rate of heat loss higher, meaning it requires proportionally more energy to keep the temperatures high than it does to keep them low then raise them suddenly.

I think.
post #1648 of 5809

^^ Exactly.  Actual heat loss is determined by a) the difference between internal and external temperatures and b) the insulation factor of the building.  Keeping the heat off reduces the difference (a), thus reducing loss.  The benefits of keeping the heat on low would mainly be a reduction of 'lag time' for bringing the house back to the warmer temperature and, in colder climates, keeping the plumbing pipes from freezing.

post #1649 of 5809
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

What are these "heaters" you people talk about?

Quiet you!
post #1650 of 5809

First quote to regrout and replace five tiles: 5700.

 

Fucking NYC.

 

lefty

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