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The Home Ownership Thread - Page 78

post #1156 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

Turk, wondering how that bearing got so rusted. That would suggest a leak somewhere, would it not?

I'd keep an eye on the washer if I were you. Bearing retention in a concentricity-sensitive application is a difficult issue, and I bet its at least part of the reason the mfg was hesitant to do or warrant the repair. Trust me, bearings, bearing retention bores, concentricity, and bearing noise in long-term applications is something I do every. single. day.

Oh, yeah. That picture is of the bearing after I removed the seal that sits over it. (You can see the ring of grease from where it landed when it popped off). I put a brand new seal in. It may have been leaking, but if it was it wasn't much. The thing was full of rust, sure, but there was no evidence water having made it to the rear bearing or into the frame of the washer.

As for the bearings, I installed them the shade tree way--by freezing the new ones, putting the old bearings on top and pounding them in with a hammer. I was really careful not to pound on the center of the bearings (I know that much, at least). It was probably not ideal, but it's worked for me in the past. The new bearings I got were sealed; whether that makes any difference I don't know.
post #1157 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post

Did you oil it at all? I've read to oil once a year or so.

I tried that on my very first piece. It helped keep the new look for about a year. I then just let it go to gray. You can spend a lot of time and money keeping them looking somewhat new with a number of different oils, chemical that reduce mold/gray and covers. Or, you can just let them sit outside and enjoy them with a natural wood look. It really depends upon what you want. But if you don't like the gray wood look I would consider getting something constructed with man made materials so that you don't have the maintenance issues.

Most of my teak I purchased in '98 and it still looks great. Shop around and see if you can find an independent importer first vs a major chain like Pottery Barn for the best price. However, if you are patient, you can often get amazing deals at the very end of the season, such as half off. The mass retailers (Target, Home Depot) often sell inexpensive but much lighter weight furniture.

If you enjoy projects, there used to be one company that offered pre-cut kits that you assemble at a good price.

If you really like the look of teak furniture, buy the heavier pieces. Be sure and select a classic style so that it is easy to mix and match with furniture from other manufacturers. Avoid the odd/modern designs that are on sale. They will be hard to pair with anything else unless you purchase an entire collection.

One last thing, I bought heavy teak folding chairs with arms. (They are a popular style in France FWIW) It has been handy to be able to fold them and put them aside when extra room is needed. Solid teak chairs are pretty large.
post #1158 of 2934
This is the style I own. Be sure and get the ones with arms.

post #1159 of 2934
I like teak, but you should also consider vintage wrought iron, which you can often find at flea markets for a modest price.
post #1160 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I like teak, but you should also consider vintage wrought iron, which you can often find at flea markets for a modest price.

We had that when I was growing up. It seemed like every summer I was having to scrap it, spray it with Rustolium, etc. Plus it was heavy to move around. That experience and photos in Maison Francaise (one of my favorite home decor magazines for ideas) led me to classic teak.
post #1161 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post

Did you oil it at all? I've read to oil once a year or so.

I marine varnished my outdoor table and i'm now on year 2 without too much of an issue. It's now starting to flake in a few areas, but I'm amazed so far that it has lasted without the need to be completely stripped and redone.
post #1162 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post

Did you oil it at all? I've read to oil once a year or so.

Depends what you want it to look like.

If you want it to be a lush brown forever, then you had better keep oiling it. If you don't mind the gray (or prefer it), teak will do very well exposed to the elements. I've seen sailboats with unoiled teak parts that are 20 years old and still look great.
post #1163 of 2934
New kitchen cabinet refacings going up while the painters are finishing the ceilings and walls. New nickel hardware being installed. If all goes well, the kitchen should be back to normal by 4pm. Keeping fingers crossed.
post #1164 of 2934
We can use the kitchen tonight although it isn't complete.
Painters - we will be done in two more days
Cabinets- we will be done tomorrow
Appliance Delivery -last pieces to be delivered Thursday
Appliance install- Gas Range, Refrigerator, microwave Friday
Floors- Final coat on hardwood floor Monday or Tuesday
Move furniture- Wed, open champagne


Regarding refacing cabinets, I got quotes from two highly rated contractors that were almost half the price that Sears or Home Depot quotes. I also heard a few inconsistent stories about the subs used by HD and Sears. I recommend researching and going direct with a guy who actually does the work and needs to maintain his reputation.
post #1165 of 2934
Connie,

there are usually programs to help first timers. Money toward down payment, rates, etc
post #1166 of 2934
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPER K View Post

Connie,

there are usually programs to help first timers.

full stop.

this is why conne should go to Amsterdam.
post #1167 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPER K View Post

Connie,

there are usually programs to help first timers. Money toward down payment, rates, etc

No one told me this.
post #1168 of 2934
I left a min-max thermometer in one of my side attics. It recorded 125 degrees, and that's on the attic that faces north!
post #1169 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post

No one told me this.

You probably weren't enough of a small timer to qualify.
post #1170 of 2934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post

How much did you guys put down on your first house?
about 22% at age 26 (northern NJ)
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