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Finding Bigfoot - Page 32

post #466 of 743
There is no such thing as the Bigfoot / Sasquatch / Yeti creature. It was a hoax from the beginning.
post #467 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I see that Tiger Snakes are protected in most Australian states. I consider myself pretty eco-sensitive, but that's a bit much for me. Certainly, if I found one around my property, I 'd merely "shoot, shovel and shut up." Actually, hacking it with a shovel or hoe would probably be more efficient and certainly less noisy.

That snake is a real heller! On googling the most dangerous snakes, I note that it made everybody's list although the lists seemed to vary greatly in their rankings.

I actually owe my existence to the forbearance of a venomous snake: When my father was a little boy on the island of Java back in 1920, he was discovered playing with a krait in the alley. Krait venom is is among the very deadliest of all terrestrial serpents'. Had the snake nailed him--he was only five at the time--he almost certainly would have died. He wouldn't have sired me, and I never would have existed. Kraits tend be very sluggish by day but are more active and aggressive by night, which is probably what saved my future father's life.

The eminent herpetologist Joe Slowinski died as the result of a seemingly superficial bite from a very small Banded Krait in northern Burma. This would have probably garnered more attention had it not occurred on September 11, 2001.

That Belcher's sea snake is pretty amazing too. Its apparently the most venomous snake on Earth.
post #468 of 743
Thread Starter 
This video seems pretty genuine to me





There is a part 2 as well, they went back to the spot.


Edited by idfnl - 3/6/13 at 4:41am
post #469 of 743
or maybe it is an elephant?
post #470 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by legorogel View Post

or maybe it is an elephant?

I think you mean Wooly Mamouth


Check this one out:

post #471 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

That Belcher's sea snake is pretty amazing too. Its apparently the most venomous snake on Earth.

Yeah, sea snakes are extremely venomous, much more toxic venoms than any terrestrial snake. However, unless you are a fisherman who gets one tangled in his net, your chances of being bitten by one are about zero. I believe most skin divers in regions where they are found are very insouciant about the proximity of sea snakes. You are obviously too large for the them to eat, so they just leave you alone.

Re the tracks in the snow above, remember I commented on the previous page that tracks often get distorted by snow melting and re-freezing. The "Devonshire Devil" was a famous case of this sort in 19th century Britain. I suspect the tracks above may have been made by a coyote, fox or bobcat bounding through the snow.
Edited by JLibourel - 3/6/13 at 2:38pm
post #472 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I see that Tiger Snakes are protected in most Australian states. I consider myself pretty eco-sensitive, but that's a bit much for me. Certainly, if I found one around my property, I 'd merely "shoot, shovel and shut up." Actually, hacking it with a shovel or hoe would probably be more efficient and certainly less noisy.

That snake is a real heller! On googling the most dangerous snakes, I note that it made everybody's list although the lists seemed to vary greatly in their rankings.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I actually owe my existence to the forbearance of a venomous snake: When my father was a little boy on the island of Java back in 1920, he was discovered playing with a krait in the alley. Krait venom is is among the very deadliest of all terrestrial serpents'. Had the snake nailed him--he was only five at the time--he almost certainly would have died. He wouldn't have sired me, and I never would have existed. Kraits tend be very sluggish by day but are more active and aggressive by night, which is probably what saved my future father's life.

The eminent herpetologist Joe Slowinski died as the result of a seemingly superficial bite from a very small Banded Krait in northern Burma. This would have probably garnered more attention had it not occurred on September 11, 2001.

Yeah, it is difficult to say which snake is the most dangerous, toxicity of venom, dose delivery, aggressiveness, proximity to large populations etc all come into play. Of the terrestrial snakes I think the Coastal Taipan is one that I would least like to have try to snack on me. Inland Taipans and possibly Blue Kraits and Brown Snakes have slightly more toxic venom based on their mouse lethal dose, the Coastal Taipans however are big aggressive fuckers and can deliver a massive dose. I believe that before the development of an antivenin no one ever survived a bite. Although with the Blue Krait something like 50% of victims still die even with antivenin, this however may be related to the fact that bites often occur in remote areas without rapid access to medical treatment.
post #473 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

Yeah, it is difficult to say which snake is the most dangerous, toxicity of venom, dose delivery, aggressiveness, proximity to large populations etc all come into play. Of the terrestrial snakes I think the Coastal Taipan is one that I would least like to have try to snack on me. Inland Taipans and possibly Blue Kraits and Brown Snakes have slightly more toxic venom based on their mouse lethal dose, the Coastal Taipans however are big aggressive fuckers and can deliver a massive dose. I believe that before the development of an antivenin no one ever survived a bite. Although with the Blue Krait something like 50% of victims still die even with antivenin, this however may be related to the fact that bites often occur in remote areas without rapid access to medical treatment.

For a fair comparison, it should be judged on toxicity. In those terms its the sea snake, but I read that it can bit with venom and without. Its also apparently not that aggressive so got a very low threat level.

In terms of which is most dangerous to humans, its got to be population density and then the aggressiveness of the snake coupled with its toxicity. In this respect, your options are pretty good.

The Gaboon Viper is also super deadly, what a weird looking snake, I recall as a kid hearing about one stolen from the National Zoo and it bit the thief:




http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2199&dat=19830406&id=W5oyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lugFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5732,1088780
post #474 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

For a fair comparison, it should be judged on toxicity. In those terms its the sea snake, Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
but I read that it can bit with venom and without. Its also apparently not that aggressive so got a very low threat level.

In terms of which is most dangerous to humans, its got to be population density and then the aggressiveness of the snake coupled with its toxicity. In this respect, your options are pretty good.

The Gaboon Viper is also super deadly, what a weird looking snake, I recall as a kid hearing about one stolen from the National Zoo and it bit the thief:




http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2199&dat=19830406&id=W5oyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lugFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5732,1088780

I specified terrestrial. I think it is common knowledge that sea snake venom is nasty stuff. That Gaboon Viper is a weird looking fellow.

On a purely "what snake is most likely to kill a human?" basis it would likely be the King Cobra. Their habitat coincides with a lot of people.
post #475 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Yeah, sea snakes are extremely venomous, much more toxic venoms than any terrestrial snake. However, unless you are a fisherman who gets one tangled in his net, your chances of being bitten by one are about zero. I believe most skin divers in regions where they are found are very insouciant about the proximity of sea snakes. You are obviously too large for the them to eat, so they just leave you alone.

Re the tracks in the snow above, remember I commented on the previous page that tracks often get distorted by snow melting and re-freezing. The "Devonshire Devil" was a famous case of this sort in 19th century Britain. I suspect the tracks above may have been made by a coyote, fox or bobcat bounding through the snow.

In the first vid, those tracks are one day old.

No way a coyote or fox is going to run that distance. Also, how to you explain the large areas disturbed where it looks like a large animal laid down. I think a moose is a more likely option, but a moose print will have a very distinct indentation, as well as disturbance of the snow above as the hooves scrape.

A fox or coyote might jump a fence, but not a moose.

Here are coyote tracks, even running there is no way it spans 5 feet. And all the way up that hill? No way.


post #476 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

I specified terrestrial. I think it is common knowledge that sea snake venom is nasty stuff. That Gaboon Viper is a weird looking fellow.

On a purely "what snake is most likely to kill a human?" basis it would likely be the King Cobra. Their habitat coincides with a lot of people.

King Cobras are generally snakes that prefer deep forests, so I don't think there are too many cases of bites on record. Some other snakes--the common (genus Naja) cobras, Russell's vipers and saw-scaled vipers--do a lot more harm, I'm pretty sure.

Surprising how many people get a kick out of keeping deadly serpents as pets. A friend of mine knew a woman who lived in a trailer with eight or nine rattlesnakes and a Gaboon Viper. The latter eventually brought about her demise. After her death, my pal kept saying, "You would have liked her." However, I don't think she would have been the girl for me! The Gaboon Viper has the longest fangs of any venomous snake--up to two inches. A keeper at the Houston zoo got nailed by one after hours and never even made it out of the reptile. However, it may have been a suicide.
post #477 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

King Cobras are generally snakes that prefer deep forests, so I don't think there are too many cases of bites on record. Some other snakes--the common (genus Naja) cobras, Russell's vipers and saw-scaled vipers--do a lot more harm, I'm pretty sure.

Surprising how many people get a kick out of keeping deadly serpents as pets. A friend of mine knew a woman who lived in a trailer with eight or nine rattlesnakes and a Gaboon Viper. The latter eventually brought about her demise. After her death, my pal kept saying, "You would have liked her." However, I don't think she would have been the girl for me! The Gaboon Viper has the longest fangs of any venomous snake--up to two inches. A keeper at the Houston zoo got nailed by one after hours and never even made it out of the reptile. However, it may have been a suicide.

Yeah King Cobra was just speculation on my part because of the population in the South and South-East Asia, but you are right they like to live in highland forests. Russell's viper, Common Cobra and Saw-Scaled Viper seem to be particularly nasty chaps.
post #478 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

In the first vid, those tracks are one day old.

No way a coyote or fox is going to run that distance. Also, how to you explain the large areas disturbed where it looks like a large animal laid down. I think a moose is a more likely option, but a moose print will have a very distinct indentation, as well as disturbance of the snow above as the hooves scrape.

A fox or coyote might jump a fence, but not a moose.

Here are coyote tracks, even running there is no way it spans 5 feet. And all the way up that hill? No way.]

Maybe you're right after all. Since it was in Utah, maybe it was a Mormon Bigfoot with a six-months' supply of food chached in a cave somewhere.
post #479 of 743
Thread Starter 
Here's that dude again. We've got to give this guy boss status. Wild deer. Snakes and rabbits, and now he rubs his body with kangaroo slime to catch a hawk?



To top this, a King Brown snake:

post #480 of 743
I have read somewhere that "King Brown" was an old name for the Coastal Taipan, but I see it is now applied to the Mulga Snake. It is not nearly as dangerous as the Tiger Snake. According to one source, bites are rarely fatal.

Still, if that guy keeps screwing with venomous snakes, especially nearly naked as he is, I imagine that sooner or later he will come to harm.
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