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Finding Bigfoot - Page 31

post #451 of 743
Regarding the BFs in Texas a little earlier, I called a friend who lives in that region for his views. He said he had hunted the thickets and creek bottoms of East Texas for deer and hogs for many years (he's 73 now), as his father had before him, and his son has after him. They had all known many outdoorsmen who had hunted the same region. Both my friend and his father had worked for many years as professional gunsmiths, which brought them into contact many more outdoorsmen than a different occupation would. During all this time, neither they nor anyone they came in contact with had ever seen a trace of any such thing--no tracks, no sightings, nothing!

He agreed that most Texas hunters would shoot a Bigfoot without a moment's hesitation.

HOWEVER, I suppose it's possible that the BFs are recent arrivals. After all, if a mountain lion could make it all the way from the Black Hills of South Dakota only to die when hit by a car on a road in Connecticut (This really happened!), I guess it's conceivable that a few Bigfoots could have made their way with great stealth down from boreal forests of the North to Beaumont, Texas, where they celebrated by screaming and throwing rocks at a mourner in a graveyard!
post #452 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Given that hunters not infrequently shoot cows and other livestock by mistake, to say nothing of other hunters, you'd think that some few, upon seeing a BF moving stealthily through the undergrowth, would drill it under the assumption that it was a bear or some other known animal.

A hunter is not going to shoot first and ask questions later. They will confirm what they are shooting at before firing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

ifdnl, what's the approximate date of the earliest report of a Bigfoot sighting in North America?

JLib is correct about hoaxes, though Native Americans have been seeing them for centuries. I think modern sightings are more credible. The earliest one I am aware of by a white person was in 1811 in Alberta Canada.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Regarding the BFs in Texas a little earlier, I called a friend who lives in that region for his views. He said he had hunted the thickets and creek bottoms of East Texas for deer and hogs for many years (he's 73 now), as his father had before him, and his son has after him. They had all known many outdoorsmen who had hunted the same region. Both my friend and his father had worked for many years as professional gunsmiths, which brought them into contact many more outdoorsmen than a different occupation would. During all this time, neither they nor anyone they came in contact with had ever seen a trace of any such thing--no tracks, no sightings, nothing!

He agreed that most Texas hunters would shoot a Bigfoot without a moment's hesitation.

HOWEVER, I suppose it's possible that the BFs are recent arrivals. After all, if a mountain lion could make it all the way from the Black Hills of South Dakota only to die when hit by a car on a road in Connecticut (This really happened!), I guess it's conceivable that a few Bigfoots could have made their way with great stealth down from boreal forests of the North to Beaumont, Texas, where they celebrated by screaming and throwing rocks at a mourner in a graveyard!

Actually, that's an interesting point about being an early arrival. Or if they are migratory it might be a winter thing. Or very few in that region. Or its bullshit.
post #453 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

A hunter is not going to shoot first and ask questions later. They will confirm what they are shooting at before firing.

I'm sure you know more about hunters than JLib







rotflmao.gif
post #454 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

I'm sure you know more about hunters than JLib


I don't know shit about hunting. Just what I see in interviews and talking to others.
post #455 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

A hunter is not going to shoot first and ask questions later. They will confirm what they are shooting at before firing.

Unfortunately, this by no means always the case,
Quote:
JLib is correct about hoaxes, though Native Americans have been seeing them for centuries. I think modern sightings are more credible. The earliest one I am aware of by a white person was in 1811 in Alberta Canada

Is that the one where somebody recorded they saw some very large "bear" tracks that looked like a giant human's? Or was it an actual sighting? If so, what were the particulars?
post #456 of 743
^Yeah, David Thompson's sighting of some tracks in the snow. Four toes and claw marks--doesn't sound like a BF to me. I note that the indigenous people with him thought it was the trail of a very large old bear, perhaps with his claws worn down. Of course, tracks in snow can often get very distorted from melting and re-freezing.
post #457 of 743
Thread Starter 
Ha ha, for sale... Bigfoot hair

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271165992197
post #458 of 743
Thread Starter 
Holy shit, this is the same dude that caught the deer bare handed:


post #459 of 743
I suppose the principle is no different from the time-honored technique of using ferrets to flush rabbits from their holes. However, if a ferret nips you, you aren't going to die, as is very likely if a tiger snake nails you. The red-bellied black snakes he was using are much less venomous. Bites from them are seldom fatal.
post #460 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I suppose the principle is no different from the time-honored technique of using ferrets to flush rabbits from their holes. However, if a ferret nips you, you aren't going to die, as is very likely if a tiger snake nails you. The red-bellied black snakes he was using are much less venomous. Bites from them are seldom fatal.

Yo... you kidding? Even a garter snake is past my comfort level.

Give that dude some props and answer honestly... would you even go near that snake??
post #461 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I suppose the principle is no different from the time-honored technique of using ferrets to flush rabbits from their holes. However, if a ferret nips you, you aren't going to die, as is very likely if a tiger snake nails you. The red-bellied black snakes he was using are much less venomous. Bites from them are seldom fatal.

I stood on a Tiger snake when I was a teenager, and my dog once killed a whole bunch of baby red-bellied black snakes and bought them to the door as presents, freaaaaked me out I hate those fuckers.
post #462 of 743
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

I stood on a Tiger snake when I was a teenager, and my dog once killed a whole bunch of baby red-bellied black snakes and bought them to the door as presents, freaaaaked me out I hate those fuckers.

Is that snake native to Australia? You Australian?
post #463 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

Is that snake native to Australia? You Australian?

Yes and yes. A lot of Australian snakes are very very dangerous.

Back in the 70s my father and brother were paddling a double kayak when a tiger snake (dangerous bastards) climbed up the front past and around my brother over the deck infront of my father and back into the water. They both shit themselves. Tigers are not usually aquatic but they can swim and the river was in flood.
post #464 of 743
I see that Tiger Snakes are protected in most Australian states. I consider myself pretty eco-sensitive, but that's a bit much for me. Certainly, if I found one around my property, I 'd merely "shoot, shovel and shut up." Actually, hacking it with a shovel or hoe would probably be more efficient and certainly less noisy.

That snake is a real heller! On googling the most dangerous snakes, I note that it made everybody's list although the lists seemed to vary greatly in their rankings.

I actually owe my existence to the forbearance of a venomous snake: When my father was a little boy on the island of Java back in 1920, he was discovered playing with a krait in the alley. Krait venom is is among the very deadliest of all terrestrial serpents'. Had the snake nailed him--he was only five at the time--he almost certainly would have died. He wouldn't have sired me, and I never would have existed. Kraits tend be very sluggish by day but are more active and aggressive by night, which is probably what saved my future father's life.

The eminent herpetologist Joe Slowinski died as the result of a seemingly superficial bite from a very small Banded Krait in northern Burma. This would have probably garnered more attention had it not occurred on September 11, 2001.
post #465 of 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


The eminent herpetologist Joe Slowinski died as the result of a seemingly superficial bite from a very small Banded Krait in northern Burma. This would have probably garnered more attention had it not been an eminent herpetologist.

FTFY
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