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Sandwich logistics - Page 3

post #31 of 47
this is my brother's sandwich recipe. the meat can vary from chicken apple sausage to steak but it's always barbequed on the grill.

then it's some sort of flat bread like a panini also lightly toasted on the grill, thousand island dressing, arugula, grilled onions, and your choice of cheese.

highly highly recommended.

-Jeff
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
i don't like the filling to overwelm the bread. hard to find the right midle ground

+1
and while we're at it, some things that bug me.

1. onions tend to overpower, so I skip 'em
2. I hate it when someone puts too much mustard or dressing on a sandwich, i want to eat it not drink it!
3. structural problems: a sandwich filled with so much extra stuff, you wind up dis- assembling it, just to eat the damn thing and keep it from falling into your lap.
4. soggy bread -pure evil
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
Then, close the sandwich and mush it all together.
THAT'S what I'm talking about.

No wonder all my sandwiches seem vaguely lacking! I forgot the part about mushing.

________________
post #34 of 47
Kind of a weird one, but I used to eat these all the time in law school - wonderbread, smoked sliced turkey, colby cheese, and spinach leaves. Mayo, mustard, and garlic pesto hummus as condiments. The flavors meld together quite well.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
Please. Let me tell y'all how a REAL man makes a sandwich.

First, you need an ATV roll. (They may only have those in PA. Like a hoagie roll - very soft.)
Then, lots of mayo (mustard or horse radish optional and preferred), at least 3 types of meat (proscuitto (sp), lebanon bologna, salami, pepperoni), american cheese, bread and butter sweet pickles, and finally the secret ingredient - chips. Yes, chips. Only the good kind with no extra ingredients. Just cooked in lard or oil.

Then, close the sandwich and mush it all together. Put it in the microwave for about 15 seconds (just to warm it up and melt the cheese a little bit) and then eat.

THAT'S what I'm talking about.

Pussies.

But dude, American cheese is the pussiest of the pussy cheeses.
post #36 of 47
On a slightly unrelated note, has anyone had the prime rib sandwiches at Lawry's Carvery at SCP? They're quite tasty albeit overpriced. I'm a big fan of Lawry's prime rib in general.
post #37 of 47
Frequent lunch for me in Iraq. It was usually twice as good as anything on the "menu":

Roast beef, turkey, bacon, olives, chips on a hoagie (ATV?) roll, with a little bit of Caesar's dressing. Cover with provolone and nuke for 60 seconds. Mmm mmm mmm.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasper
There seems to be a good amount of people here who are able to appreciate the details that go into making a great sandwich. For example I think that shredded lettuce makes a big difference when it comes to hoagies but other styles of sandwiches require using nearly whole lettuce leaves.

The quality and size of the bread or roll is something that can easily ruin a sandwich. I really dislike when a large kaiser roll is used for a hamburger as it can hurt the roof of the mouth and feels like you are only eating a roll no matter how large the patty is.

I agree with all of your specifications, and your BLT recipe is perfect; putting salt and pepper directly on tomatoes makes a huge difference.
For grilled cheese: white bread, sharp cheddar cheese (never American), 2 or possibly 3 slices of cheese (too much cheese ruins it for me, which they typically do in most NYC deli's), grilled slowly over low heat in lightly buttered pan.
post #39 of 47
Burns: Oh, quit cogitating, Steinmetz, and use an open-faced club. The sand wedge!
Homer: Mmm... open-faced club sandwich.
post #40 of 47
Two Grilled Cheese variations, both starting w/ good bread lightly buttered ('outside' of both pieces):

1. Place one piece of bread in a medium hot iron skillet/frying pan buttered side down; put a dollop of good mustard on the side facing up (duh) & spread; add a couple of pieces of thinly sliced Vidalia onion and two slices of munster cheese; top w/ other piece of bread and flip when golden brown. Remove when second side is nice and brown; serve w/ tomato soup

2. Chop up a few chipotle peppers in adobo sauce; start as above w/ bread grilling; put on 2 nice slices of sharp cheddar cheese; add a half dozen or so chopped chipotle pieces and some cilantro (thin sliced red onion optional); top w/ other piece of bread and flip when golden brown; finish as above.

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
But dude, American cheese is the pussiest of the pussy cheeses.

Yeah, but I couldn't really find any other cheese that worked as well.
post #42 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts4them
For grilled cheese: white bread, sharp cheddar cheese (never American), 2 or possibly 3 slices of cheese (too much cheese ruins it for me, which they typically do in most NYC deli's), grilled slowly over low heat in lightly buttered pan.

I agree with you about too much cheese. That can actually be dangerous because it can be like molten lava in the middle and I don't think anyone can enjoy a sandwich after burning their mouth.

The only other variation of grilled cheese that I make is with swiss and rye. That combination is perfect especially around the crust when the cheese gets golden brown. Sometimes I do put a thinly sliced tomato in the middle but I don’t know if it actually improves on the original.
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy
Good mustard is imperative for me when it comes to most sandwiches.
+1
post #44 of 47
I like my grilled cheese charred on the outside. Then I dunk that shit in cream of tomato soup.
post #45 of 47
Branston Pickle (basically a kind of British chutney) takes grilled cheese to a whole other level.
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