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Sandwich logistics - Page 2

post #16 of 47
Good mustard is imperative for me when it comes to most sandwiches.
post #17 of 47
It's past 10:30 at night. I shouldn't have read this thread. I went downstairs and made a Boulevardier sandwich. That is roasted rosemary chicken, with vinaigrette-marinated onions, julienne carrots, with some creamy goat cheese and mild Meaux mustard on an oven heated croissant.

Unwisely, I started to read LabelKing's Unusual Foods thread just now. The sandwich's afterglow immediately disappeared!
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post #18 of 47
Tomatoes are fine, I find. It is important they don't get to stand in the sandwich for any length of time allowing their water to seep into the bread. They should be made fresh. Also, aren't tomatoes classified as fruit, not veg?
post #19 of 47
I usually take two pieces of sliced sourdough bread (or whatever else you fancy). Spread pesto on one side of each slice. Take some sliced chicken breast, and place it on one piece of bread. Then, sprinkle the chicken with mozzarella, and grated parmigiano reggiano, and bit of garlic powder. You can add other crap if you like at this point, but I usually keep it simple.

Stack the other piece of bread on top, and brush both sides with olive oil and throw it in a panini maker, or one of those indoor contact grills that has a lid. Cook it for a few minutes, until the top is crunchy and golden brown. Serve with soup.

I've also done pizza paninis with cooked pepperoni, cheese, mushrooms, peppers, etc, etc. and putting tomato sauce instead of pesto on the bread. Cook it the same way.
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy
Good mustard is imperative for me when it comes to most sandwiches.

good mustard = it punches you in the nose good, like wasabi
post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
good mustard = it punches you in the nose good, like wasabi
I remember my first wasabi experience, at one of the conveyor belt sushi places. My partner told me it was comparable to ketchup in strength, so I dunked good and proper; ten seconds later I thought I was going to die. Ah, memories...
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britalian
Tomatoes are fine, I find. It is important they don't get to stand in the sandwich for any length of time allowing their water to seep into the bread. They should be made fresh. Also, aren't tomatoes classified as fruit, not veg?
Yes, as are avocados. They're treated as such down in Brazil where avocado ice cream is rather popular.
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
good mustard = it punches you in the nose good, like wasabi
I'd have to disagree with you and quite possibly a good number of Angelenos. Phillippe's french dip in LA is famous for their hot mustard, something that completely kills any taste of the sandwich itself and makes the experience rather regretable. I do like mustard and I do like spicy things (Louisiana hot sauce on a po'boy, etc.) but not when it's overwhelming.
post #23 of 47
post #24 of 47
i don't like the filling to overwelm the bread. hard to find the right midle ground
post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
good mustard = it punches you in the nose good, like wasabi
Apparently, proper wasabi has much more flavor and less overt bite than the stuff we get in sushi places around here (which is mostly horseradish.)
post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britalian
I remember my first wasabi experience, at one of the conveyor belt sushi places. My partner told me it was comparable to ketchup in strength, so I dunked good and proper; ten seconds later I thought I was going to die. Ah, memories...

My partner told me it was guacamole. It was a memory alright...
post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Another good one.. grilled chicken with pesto, avocado, lettuce, tomato, and alfafa sprouts, on a good roll of course. Oh and freshly ground tellicherry pepper for a bit of bite.

Keep eating like that and people will think you're a Democrat.


For me?

Corned beef, Swiss, Russian dressing, and cole slaw on crusted bread that you have to earn your way through.
post #28 of 47
A sandwich ingredient that is second to none: Boar's Head Ovengold Roast Breast of Turkey. It's actually one of their healthier selections, too, but its amazingly delicious.

I usually go for simplicity, since I eat sandwiches every day. A good meat, such as the one I listed above, and a good cheese on some good bread (I have a good dark German wheat right now), toasted of course, with one large romaine leaf freshly washed and shaken dry. Some spicy mustard is a nice option, but not required.
post #29 of 47
Thread Starter 
I like romaine lettuce on certain sandwiches but only if most the white stem is removed as it can taste bitter.
post #30 of 47
Please. Let me tell y'all how a REAL man makes a sandwich. First, you need an ATV roll. (They may only have those in PA. Like a hoagie roll - very soft.) Then, lots of mayo (mustard or horse radish optional and preferred), at least 3 types of meat (proscuitto (sp), lebanon bologna, salami, pepperoni), american cheese, bread and butter sweet pickles, and finally the secret ingredient - chips. Yes, chips. Only the good kind with no extra ingredients. Just cooked in lard or oil. Then, close the sandwich and mush it all together. Put it in the microwave for about 15 seconds (just to warm it up and melt the cheese a little bit) and then eat. THAT'S what I'm talking about. Pussies.
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