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Everlane T-shirts - Page 207

post #3091 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxxamazexxx View Post

I'm curious... has anyone actually bought their $40 towel?

After my great experience with the oxford shirt and the backpack, I feel that Everlane has strayed somewhat from their vision. Starting with the $40 polo, which doesn't sound so bad until you get them (a nice shirt but excessive detailing; you can easily do better), then the women $105 sandals, and now $40 towel. Unless someone has got them and really thinks they're worth $40 or even $20, I'm not buying the direction Everlane is going. It looks less like 'affordable luxury' and more like 'luxury affordables' now.

Turkish towels are expensive. Everlane seems to price them lower than other retailers. I'm not interested in the towels, but I think they fit with Everlane's vision.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crump's Brother View Post

I'd rather Everlane did something like that instead of poplin shirts and towels. Last year when I first knew about Everlane and took a look at their cashmere, oxford, and weekender, I thought they were on to something. Leather shoes, sport coats, selvage denim, and all that jazz. Not poplin shirts and towels.

I don't see how poplin shirts are such a directional change from cashmere and oxfords. Care to explain?
post #3092 of 3357
^i don't know who made that comment but it wasn't me
post #3093 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahjota View Post


Turkish towels are expensive. Everlane seems to price them lower than other retailers. I'm not interested in the towels, but I think they fit with Everlane's vision.

I don't see how poplin shirts are such a directional change from cashmere and oxfords. Care to explain?

 

That is why I want to know from somebody who has bought the towels. Just like you I can't be convinced to buy it, but I don't want to unfairly write it off just because I haven't experienced it. Even though I'm not wont to give it the benefit of the doubt either.

 

As to why I don't find the towels and poplin shirts very fitting with Everlane's vision, here are the key words: affordable luxury. Everlane brings products that are considered 'luxury' closer to the consumers' buying ability and makes the transaction happen. Everlane's customers are the people who have never shelled out hundreds of dollars for a cashmere sweater, or have but done so grudgingly. Now everybody wins. People get to buy and Everlane gets to sell.

 

The prospects, however, are not the same when Everlane moves down the luxury scale. No matter how 'good' their poplin shirts are (and that's an entirely different story), I suspect everyone of us can already do better. I, for one, am not exactly jumping for joy because I now get to buy a poplin shirt at $55. People had always been able to buy decent poplin shirts around that price level before Everlane came along. In other words, the magic doesn't happen with this one.

 

It may sound baffling as to why at the same 2.2x markup the cashmere sweater is a good buy and the poplin shirt is not. It is because the two of them are not created equal. You need serious investing in the production of a cashmere sweater for it to be worthy of being a cashmere sweater. Not so much with a poplin shirt. I appreciate paying $120 for a cashmere sweater that costs $50 to make, because it's much better than paying $400 for the same sweater or paying $100 for a trashy one that costs $15 (and probably will melt on me the first time I wear it.)

 

I can't, however, make the same analogy with the poplin shirt. Would I buy a $40 poplin shirt at American Eagle that is objectively inferior with double stitching and plastic buttons? I gladly might. It's a poplin shirt. It won't melt or explode however cheaply it is made and sold.

 

Another thing that concerns me is that there is opportunity cost to everything. Somebody mentioned a certain 'Common Project-esque shoes' and I just wondered why poplin shirt instead of that? In my opinion, there are better merits and commercial prospects to focusing on true 'affordable luxury' than churning out 'luxury affordables.' 

 

I hope Everlane will keep bringing products that resonate well with customers. There are still selvage denims, Harris Tweed jackets, oxford balmorals, waxed cotton parkas - endless choices that don't have to be pool towels, poplin shirts, laptop sleeves or cashmere underwear.


Edited by xxxamazexxx - 7/9/13 at 7:44am
post #3094 of 3357

I might buy the cashmere underwear though. It's luxury as f and I would love to be able to afford that.

post #3095 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crump's Brother View Post

^i don't know who made that comment but it wasn't me

My bad -- I messed up the quotes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxxamazexxx View Post

That is why I want to know from somebody who has bought the towels. Just like you I can't be convinced to buy it, but I don't want to unfairly write it off just because I haven't experienced it. Even though I'm not wont to give it the benefit of the doubt either.

To clarify, I'm not interested in Everlane's pool towels because of lack of knowledge or experience of the product. It is because I have zero need or want for pool towels right now. I have a nice pool towel. I don't need another. nod[1].gif

I'd be down for a robe, though.
Quote:
As to why I don't find the towels and poplin shirts very fitting with Everlane's vision, here are the key words: affordable luxury. Everlane brings products that are considered 'luxury' closer to the consumers' buying ability and makes the transaction happen. Everlane's customers are the people who have never shelled out hundreds of dollars for a cashmere sweater, or have but done so grudgingly. Now everybody wins. People get to buy and Everlane gets to sell.

I don't think this is Everlane's vision. Look at the page title of everlane.com: "Modern Basics. Radical Transparency." That tells me more about what Everlane is trying to do than anything else. That their products come in comparatively luxurious fabrics like cashmere is, I think, an added bonus.
Quote:
The prospects, however, are not the same when Everlane moves down the luxury scale. No matter how 'good' their poplin shirts are (and that's an entirely different story), I suspect everyone of us can already do better. I, for one, am not exactly jumping for joy because I now get to buy a poplin shirt at $55. People had always been able to buy decent poplin shirts around that price level before Everlane came along. In other words, the magic doesn't happen with this one.

It may sound baffling as to why at the same 2.2x markup the cashmere sweater is a good buy and the poplin shirt is not. It is because the two of them are not created equal. You need serious investing in the production of a cashmere sweater for it to be worthy of being a cashmere sweater. Not so much with a poplin shirt. I appreciate paying $120 for a cashmere sweater that costs $50 to make, because it's much better than paying $400 for the same sweater or paying $100 for a trashy one that costs $15 (and probably will melt on me the first time I wear it.)

I can't, however, make the same analogy with the poplin shirt. Would I buy a $40 poplin shirt at American Eagle that is objectively inferior with double stitching and plastic buttons? I gladly might. It's a poplin shirt. It won't melt or explode however cheaply it is made and sold.

You also said in an earlier post that you had a great experience with the oxford shirt. You can ALSO get an objectively inferior oxford shirt from other retailers. Would you not give Everlane the same benefit of the doubt for their other woven shirt that's made of different fabric?

If Everlane wanted to sell a shirt comparable in quality and provenance to one from AE, given their interest in transparency, they probably could for $10 or $15. But they target a higher price point and level.
Quote:
Another thing that concerns me is that there is opportunity cost to everything. Somebody mentioned a certain 'Common Project-esque shoes' and I just wondered why poplin shirt instead of that?

If Everlane was indeed looking into such shoes -- and I'm not even sure of that without a quote or reference, as all we have is hearsay -- it may be that Everlane was able to establish the design of and manufacturing process for poplin shirts before they could do the same for shoes. There is that overhead.
Quote:
In my opinion, there are better merits and commercial prospects to focusing on true 'affordable luxury' than churning out 'luxury affordables.' 

And yet Everlane's core products are their t-shirts, which start at $15. If those aren't luxury affordables, I don't know what are.
Quote:
I hope Everlane will keep bringing products that resonate well with customers. There are still selvage denims, Harris Tweed jackets, oxford balmorals, waxed cotton parkas - endless choices that don't have to be pool towels, poplin shirts, laptop sleeves or cashmere underwear.

It almost sounds as if you want Everlane to take on a more heritage-focused direction. I'm sure if they want to, they can, but there are many other brands that do this and do this well.
post #3096 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post


No Merlot for this restock. We'll have a slightly different merlot for September. The fall release should also feature improved collars and hems that our team is still working on.



Is the Forest colorway gone as well? 

post #3097 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahjota View Post

You also said in an earlier post that you had a great experience with the oxford shirt. You can ALSO get an objectively inferior oxford shirt from other retailers. Would you not give Everlane the same benefit of the doubt for their other woven shirt that's made of different fabric?
If Everlane wanted to sell a shirt comparable in quality and provenance to one from AE, given their interest in transparency, they probably could for $10 or $15. But they target a higher price point and level.
If Everlane was indeed looking into such shoes -- and I'm not even sure of that without a quote or reference, as all we have is hearsay -- it may be that Everlane was able to establish the design of and manufacturing process for poplin shirts before they could do the same for shoes. There is that overhead.
And yet Everlane's core products are their t-shirts, which start at $15. If those aren't luxury affordables, I don't know what are.
It almost sounds as if you want Everlane to take on a more heritage-focused direction. I'm sure if they want to, they can, but there are many other brands that do this and do this well.

 

Oxford shirt > Poplin shirt, IMO. If you also think there's a hierarchy of some sort where oxford shirts are a little bit more of a 'luxury' than poplin shirts, then that explains why I bought the oxford shirts and not the poplin, both of them the same price.

 

In retrospect, the oxford shirt isn't as well-received as I myself liked it. Here's what Putthison said:

Quote:
Everlane’s quality promise is that they can make clothes that would be twice as expensive without their direct-to-consumer model. I don’t think I buy that. I’d say these shirts are comparable to Lands’ End Canvas, which are $5 less at retail (and often on sale - right now you could buy one for $21). They’re also pretty similar to Uniqlo’s offering, which is $29.90 at full price, and also regularly goes on sale.

 

Basically, Putthison didn't endorse the oxford shirts for the same reason I didn't endorse the poplin shirts. Those shirts are kind of middle-of-the-line products; some people still like them and buy them, some don't. But I'm willing to bet that they are not such huge hits as the cashmere sweater or the weekender.

 

As to the t-shirts, I don't even know what is the luxury about them (I don't buy the 'Made in America' spiel, as shouldn't you.) And again I'm not exactly jumping for joy coz $15 t-shirts. I did, however, give it the benefit of doubt, and wasn't particularly impressed (I want to know what particular designer brand would sell the exactly same t-shirt for $50.) The only redeeming quality is that they are $15 each, not $25; they are basic, okay t-shirts, made and priced just as they should be. You actually hit the point when you said that if Everlane brought the poplin shirt closer to the standard of American Eagle and sold it at like $20 (although I would go with Banana Republic and $30), that might be better for both Everlane and the customers. Another option is to go luxury all the way, sort of like Ledbury with their dress shirts. Otherwise, just keep it basic, keep it affordable, keep it good, and don't make a luxury out of anything that is not supposed to be a luxury.

 

Everlane is a gem, but it quickly loses it shine as it slides down the product portfolio. If 'heritage-focused' is the correct term for the direction I would love Everlane to take, why yes, I wish it were a whole lot more heritage-based. That's a better niche than being a discount version of popular mall brands.


Edited by xxxamazexxx - 7/9/13 at 7:57pm
post #3098 of 3357

so many words

post #3099 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxxamazexxx View Post

Otherwise, just keep it basic, keep it affordable, keep it good, and don't make a luxury out of anything that is not supposed to be a luxury.

Everlane is a gem, but it quickly loses it shine as it slides down the product portfolio. If 'heritage-focused' is the correct term for the direction I would love Everlane to take, why yes, I wish it were a whole lot more heritage-based. That's a better niche than being a discount version of popular mall brands.

Where does this luxury connection with Everlane come in? Can you cite it?

I agree with Ahjota. If you are looking for "heritage focused" there are other brands that do that already.
post #3100 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston S. View Post


Where does this luxury connection with Everlane come in? Can you cite it?

 

If my memory serves me well, the landing page of Everlane used to talk a great deal about 'designer' and 'luxury.' Now there's only some copy about transparency and cost. The connection to 'designer' and 'luxury' didn't go unnoticed though.

 

 

Quote:
I agree with Ahjota. If you are looking for "heritage focused" there are other brands that do that already.

 

Please give me names. TIA.

post #3101 of 3357

just received a couple pockets tees, they feel tighter in the chest than the ones I got last year (size S, I'm 5'10" low 150s), anyone else noticed this? It's a shame because the length is pretty much perfect, so I'm not sure I want to size up

post #3102 of 3357
So does Everlane always offer free returns? Because it says it's only for new customers but I signed up months ago and still didn't have to pay.
post #3103 of 3357
Anyone have the measurements for the v-neck in XS?
post #3104 of 3357

 

 

 

So I caved and decided to try for my first purchase from everlane. This is the XS tshirt from them. How's the fit? Just for reference, I'm 5'4", 130lb, so I opted for the XS since their size chart told me it was fine

post #3105 of 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZxRP View Post

 

 

 

So I caved and decided to try for my first purchase from everlane. This is the XS tshirt from them. How's the fit? Just for reference, I'm 5'4", 130lb, so I opted for the XS since their size chart told me it was fine

 

 

way too small

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