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Why do you dress the way you do? - Page 7

post #91 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by O'Higgins View Post

Unfortunately, this sloppy style of dress is carrying over to services on Sunday. I am shocked at the way people now dress in church and I feel it has carried over to their worship style. It's like " Let's get this church business over so I can do something else."
Funerals around these parts require your best Harley shirt; seriously.
post #92 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

1. Project an Image - at least one of someone who is interesting, but ideally one of competence, intellect and honor/fair dealing.

This is why I started.
But, I've become fascinated with the technical aspects of fabric and construction.
post #93 of 108
I wear mostly tweed, corduroy, wool and flannel in the fall and winter. I don't need to be particularly dressed up for work so I like these fabric choices because they are comfortable and work well for the office, any stops on the way home, and lounging around the house afterwards.

In the warmer weather, I stick to chinos and polo shirts or OCBD for the same reasons as above.

For me, it all boils down to comfort and versatility.
post #94 of 108

Hi folks, new to this site so be gentle with me.

 

I wear the clothes I do because being a Mod I like to look sharp, so most of the time it's tailored suits, made to fit suits or tailored trousers. I dislike most of the mass produced stuff you see in shops and it annoys me to see kids in T shirts and jeans, looking like they've been dragged through an edge backwards. Some of the stuff I see people wear is ok but they have little knowledge of how to put stuff together which is why I joined this site, you guys know what you're talking about.

post #95 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgmetcalf View Post looking like they've been dragged through an edge backwards


 

Beautiful... I love these mishearings of popular sayings. It's 'dragged through a hedge backwards'... but your version has a surreal err, edge to it. biggrin.gif

 

post #96 of 108

I suspect that there are more edges than hedges in fashion nowadays in any case.

post #97 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post


 

Beautiful... I love these mishearings of popular sayings. It's 'dragged through a hedge backwards'... but your version has a surreal err, edge to it. biggrin.gif

 



We drop our Hs in the UK  biggrin.gif

 

 

post #98 of 108
Holdfast, this is one of those threads that I can't believe hasn't been done before. Outstanding.

Your original post largely summed it up for me, but, to expand, for me a lot goes back to being an adolescent/young man in the early to mid 80s. To expand:

1. I lived the style horror of the 70s;
2. Then the early-80s "retro" (before anyone said "retro") aesthetic came along as seen in almost all fims, music videos, etc of the period (when did you last see a music video with the band in black tie?);
3. As a slim 6 foot tall 16-year old, I experienced the ignominy of NOTHING rtw then available fitting me;
4. At the same time, I realised that many clothes in charity/thrift/second hand shops were far better made than new rtw;
5. As a slim 6 foot 2 17-18-year old, I discovered that MTM and bespoke could solve the fit and the quality issues above;
6. And I discovered that MTM and bespoke gave me choice over every major and many minor aspects of my clothes;
7. Never looking back thereafter;
8. I like being seen positively as the "guy who dresses like that";
9. I do not care about being seen negatively as the "guy who dresses like that";
10. I enjoy the history, cradtsmanship and subtle details of clothing.
post #99 of 108
Holdfast, this is one of those threads that I can't believe hasn't been done before. Outstanding.

Your original post largely summed it up for me, but, to expand, for me a lot goes back to being an adolescent/young man in the early to mid 80s. To expand:

1. I lived the style horror of the 70s;
2. Then the early-80s "retro" (before anyone said "retro") aesthetic came along as seen in almost all fims, music videos, etc of the period (when did you last see a music video with the band in black tie?);
3. As a slim 6 foot tall 16-year old, I experienced the ignominy of NOTHING rtw then available fitting me;
4. At the same time, I realised that many clothes in charity/thrift/second hand shops were far better made than new rtw;
5. As a slim 6 foot 2 17-18-year old, I discovered that MTM and bespoke could solve the fit and the quality issues above;
6. And I discovered that MTM and bespoke gave me choice over every major and many minor aspects of my clothes;
7. Never looking back thereafter;
8. I like being seen positively as the "guy who dresses like that";
9. I do not care about being seen negatively as the "guy who dresses like that";
10. I enjoy the history, craftsmanship and subtle details of clothing.
post #100 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post



I'm not sure race comes into it really. Lots of people from different ethnic backgrounds and wealth profiles are aping the mien of the underclass. On the bus (I live in San Francisco where everyone rides the bus) I encountered a group of teenage boys sitting in the back, "signifying" amongst each other, calling each other the n-word, and in general making all the other passengers nervous. Apart from said n-word they were speaking Urdu.

One morning I walk into the neighborhood cafe and this dork who is as white as I am was wearing a "stop snitching" t-shirt. I ended up ordering a breakfast sandwich, in order to avoid any temptation to use a fork on the little shit's eyes.

Furthermore if you're out on the street alone at two in the morning, and you see someone with a briefcase, you should still be concerned. If someone is carrying a briefcase at that time of night it has more than paperwork in it.

Sounds like it's time to move to Palo Alto.
post #101 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post



 
Beautiful... I love these mishearings of popular sayings. It's 'dragged through a hedge backwards'... but your version has a surreal err, edge to it. biggrin.gif

I read that in a Cockney accent.

"Cor blimey, 'e looks like 'e's just been dragged through an edge backwards!"
post #102 of 108
Interesting read though is it a smidgen self-justificatory? If we're being honest, surely personal vanity is rather more to the fore than wanting to project a particular, professional image? You can project a professional image without spending hours on a board fetishising clothes to the extent that we do. You can project a professional image without a psychedelic hanky exploding from your breast pocket. And nobody at your meeting cares that your shoes cost enough to fresh drinking water for the rural population of Somalia.

For me, I never underwent some sort of epiphany where I suddenly decided to 'up my game'. I've always liked clothes, from being an 8 year old watching the punks marching up and down the Kings Road to the mods and skinheads who used to descend on the town of Brighton, where I grew up, every bank holiday to batter the bejesus out of each other. As a kid in the 80s, I ran the gamut of kiddy fashion, from sta pressed and loafers of the 2 tone and mod revival to the classic label obsession of the casuals (I still have fond memories of my selection of soft wool Kappa golfing sweaters and Lois jumbo cords). By the time I was doing A levels, the vintage thing had kicked in and I was a combination of vintage Americana and thrifted sports jackets (soundtrack by the Jesus and Mary Chain and the C86 'birth of indie' bands), reading ID, The Face and the first issue of Arena (the US GQ seemed too neurotic and insecure, full of 'How do I dress if I want to make the right impression at my new country club?' type pieces at that stage). By the time I'd finished my degree and started my post graduate studies, I'd begun to settle down into a slightly preppy-inspired style which was fashionable in the mid-90s and was particularly useful as I'd begun lecturing alongside my PhD. Didn't want to look like the students I was teaching but neither did I want to look like a young fogey. But that would have been the same even in a different profession: by your late 20s, you shouldn't be dressing like a teenager but neither should you be dressing like a Tory MP on a day off. I've mostly stuck with this ever since (still wearing a couple of Smedleys purchased then).

So, in short, personal vanity. I suppose. But, by the same token, I hate prissiness or self-obsession. As a student, I would have happily taken a flame thrower to any of my fellows who turned up to class in a suit (unless they'd come straight from the dock!). Couldn't stand these mini-Niles Cranes who thought dressing like a grown up would make them stand out from the nasty, rough boys.

So as well as being vain, I'm also a raging bundle of contradictions. Sounds like I need some sessions with Holdfast to sort my head out. shog[1].gif
post #103 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post


Sounds like it's time to move to Palo Alto.


Yeah, right, Walk Your Bike. I was born in Sequoia Hospital and lived as kid on Oregon Ave before it became "Oregon Expressway". If I did that I'd end up hanging out at Antonio's Nut House yammering about being a native and complaining about arrivistes. I prefer being on the other end of that diatribe up here. Plus I hate driving.

post #104 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg View Post

Interesting read though is it a smidgen self-justificatory?


I'm glad someone posted this.

 

Insight is an elusive thing; it's possible to argue that we can never really know whether we have it or not, as everything can be reduced to a human-defined construct, even our basic sense perceptions. So one man's self-avowed insight may in the eyes of another man simply be his ego defence. There's a risk of over-reductionism with this line of argument though, which can be short-circuited by applying a more practical test: does the construct work for you, or against you?

 

I think you highlight an important point: it's always worth questioning whether we're right or not, or more precisely, whether what we think is right is working well for us or not.

post #105 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post



Yeah, right, Walk Your Bike. I was born in Sequoia Hospital and lived as kid on Oregon Ave before it became "Oregon Expressway". If I did that I'd end up hanging out at Antonio's Nut House yammering about being a native and complaining about arrivistes. I prefer being on the other end of that diatribe up here. Plus I hate driving.

Interesting. I am an arriviste. Moved here from Chicago in '88 where the urban environment was as you describe, but more intense,
leavened by the Crack epidemic, no doubt. Until about five years ago, my neighbor across the street, was Tony, owner of the
eponymous Antonio's Nut House. He moved to Santa Clara, I think.
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