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Contrasting boutonniere hole/cuff buttonhole stitching

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I saw contrast white stitching on a gant navy blazer and liked it. I'm considering having my tailor add this to my navy blazer, but wanted input on potential downsides in the flexibility of the garment, etc. the contrast white stitching is in the lapel button hole and first button of the cuffs. Any quick input appreciated!!
post #2 of 17
Don't do it.
post #3 of 17
No
post #4 of 17
cant recommend it
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok... so I was talked off the ledge and skipped the tailor's today. Care to enlighten why I should avoid this? See below for what I'm thinking of:

http://us.gant.com/men/clothes/blazers/r1-the-cordster-blazer
http://us.gant.com/men/clothes/blazers/r1-the-flannel-blazer

at epaulet:
http://www.epauletshop.com/servlet/the-1120/Gant-Rugger-2-dsh-Button-Navy/Detail

Thx
post #6 of 17

I hate this crap, I think it's very very very very tacky. Astor & Black is doing a lot of them, they claim to be bespoke.

post #7 of 17
It's a matter of taste.
post #8 of 17
99% of the time it just looks tacky.
post #9 of 17
Don't - it looks dreadful: A good way to ruin something.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post

I saw contrast white stitching on a gant navy blazer and liked it. I'm considering having my tailor add this to my navy blazer, but wanted input on potential downsides in the flexibility of the garment, etc. the contrast white stitching is in the lapel button hole and first button of the cuffs. Any quick input appreciated!!


I think the Gant blazer looks a little eccentric- but then I guess it's supposed to, what with elbow patches too.  Bit risky to add the white detailing if your blazer is already fine. Leave as it is.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok, thanks for talking me off the ledge! Would probably have regretted the decision.
post #12 of 17

Good for you because it would have been a disaster. The gant blazer is perfect the way it is.

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ich_Dien View Post

Don't do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred49 View Post

No
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klensten View Post

Not a good idea...
6241.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenixrecon View Post

cant recommend it
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manofstyle85 View Post

I hate this crap, I think it's very very very very tacky. Astor & Black is doing a lot of them, they claim to be bespoke.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post

99% of the time it just looks tacky.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

Don't - it looks dreadful: A good way to ruin something.

nod[1].gif
post #14 of 17
I disagree with the groupthink on this one... while it's true contrasting color buttonholes evokes a casual air and maybe a bad high school uniform you may remember, if the rest of the getup is tasteful, I think it adds a subtle, interesting touch. To my eyes, a pocketsquare is much more prone to be tacky.

61610ItBling_2244Web.jpg
post #15 of 17
I'm going to say that there are times when a contrasting milanaise is appropriate. I agree with the general sentiment that high contrast doesn't look great, but I've always liked contrast on tweeds (for example, when the contrasting colour picks up the overcheck in the cloth).

Here's an experimental one I did yesterday - black on B/W birdseye, and thicker gimp than I usually use. I think the thick gimp is a bit of a miss unless on overcoats, but I'm glad I tried so that I know for the future.

H9tqo.jpg
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