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A view on Neapolitan shirtmakers and hand finishes - Page 5

post #61 of 81
I have yet to have a single Geneva shirt give out or fray in any way and the oldest date back to 2005. I do have a lot of them so I have no idea how often each gets worn, at most once every 2 weeks. It also helps a lot that they are always hand pressed.

Oh, and those CEGO OCBDs will NEVER wear out. Carl sent me an email the other day saying "Hey come down I have this great new cloth" and I replied "unfortunately for you, the dozen or so you made me look like they are going to last the rest of my life, sorry."
post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I have yet to have a single Geneva shirt give out or fray in any way and the oldest date back to 2005. I do have a lot of them so I have no idea how often each gets worn, at most once every 2 weeks. It also helps a lot that they are always hand pressed.
Oh, and those CEGO OCBDs will NEVER wear out. Carl sent me an email the other day saying "Hey come down I have this great new cloth" and I replied "unfortunately for you, the dozen or so you made me look like they are going to last the rest of my life, sorry."

Do you wash and iron your shirts yourself? I have noticed a huge difference in mine since I started doing it on new shirts.
post #63 of 81
No, a local laundry does it.

Oh, it also helps that I basically never order anything finer than 100s. For my most recent batch, I wanted a really pale blue. Eugene showed me this Alumo book, perfect color, it was 120s. I was like, order it. And he said, you know, I don't have the swatch but they make this same color, or very close, in 100s, get that and save $20 (or whatever it was) and get more life out of the shirt. Of course I took his advice.
post #64 of 81
I do the same thing. While the hand is nice on the finer stuff, I personally would rather have the longevity.
post #65 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quarantanove View Post

But how would you compare the collar to Matuozzo (interlining as well as shape), which I assume is similar to Merolla to an extent?  Did you have Geneva make a collar without collar stays as the Neopolitans do?

Well, the one Geneva shirt I have is an evening shirt with a pique-faced collar, so it is difficult to compare. That said, they put in the thinnest, lightest interlining they had, did not fuse, and did not install collar stays. The resulting collar shape is exactly as I like it. It keeps a nice, natural-looking concave curvature without rumpling. I imagine that a normal, non-faced collar constructed in a similar fashion would be very, very similar in feel to the Matuozzo collars I have. I think the main difference is the fabric. Riva is supernaturally soft and ethereal from new.
post #66 of 81
All my shirts are laundered at home in lingerie bags, hung dry, and hand ironed. The Riva stuff has begun to disintegrate after three to four years of wear similar in frequency to what Manton describes.
post #67 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

All my shirts are laundered at home in lingerie bags, hung dry, and hand ironed. The Riva stuff has begun to disintegrate after three to four years of wear similar in frequency to what Manton describes.

You mean bras?
post #68 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You mean bras?

The mesh bag for lingerie, not limited to bras. Your wife doesn't wear boxers does she? confused.gif
post #69 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

The mesh bag for lingerie, not limited to bras. Your wife doesn't wear boxers does she? confused.gif

Wait, I have a wife? confused.gif

Boy shorts.
post #70 of 81
PB, this is a good point in this thread where you re-introduce the story about sniffing the underarms of your shirts.
post #71 of 81
Good point, thanks for reminding me. It is a rather, foo, reevolving, iroh type post:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/286823/stinky-weaves/0_100#post_5186091
post #72 of 81
I feel I should add that hand stitching is weaker, and unravels when it breaks, unlike a lockstitch. The whole point of insisting on a "single needle tailored" shirt is the lockstitch. A cheapo chainstitch will unravel but it's at least stronger than a lockstitch, whereas the hand blindstitch breaks much easier.

Also handstitching (even "good" handstitching) isn't difficult. It's rare because making lots of neat, tight stitches takes time. It's not actually hard to do, especially if the shirt is actually held together by machine stitches (which is usually the case).
post #73 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


Well, the one Geneva shirt I have is an evening shirt with a pique-faced collar, so it is difficult to compare. That said, they put in the thinnest, lightest interlining they had, did not fuse, and did not install collar stays. The resulting collar shape is exactly as I like it. It keeps a nice, natural-looking concave curvature without rumpling. I imagine that a normal, non-faced collar constructed in a similar fashion would be very, very similar in feel to the Matuozzo collars I have. I think the main difference is the fabric. Riva is supernaturally soft and ethereal from new.


 

Thank you that's what I was hoping!  I think I will then be making a stop on 32nd st. next week.  

post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

I feel I should add that hand stitching is weaker, and unravels when it breaks, unlike a lockstitch. The whole point of insisting on a "single needle tailored" shirt is the lockstitch. A cheapo chainstitch will unravel but it's at least stronger than a lockstitch, whereas the hand blindstitch breaks much easier.
Also handstitching (even "good" handstitching) isn't difficult. It's rare because making lots of neat, tight stitches takes time. It's not actually hard to do, especially if the shirt is actually held together by machine stitches (which is usually the case).

All I can say is that the hand-stitches on my Matuozzo shirts have held up perfectly. Only the fabric has suffered.

I cannot speak to how difficult hand-stiching is compared to something else, but there is clearly better and worse hand-stitching out there. Typically, one must pay quite a bit to get the good stuff.
post #75 of 81
The only shirt I wear stays with any more is my formal shirt. Just doesn't seem right to be without.
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