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Unusual foods. - Page 2

post #16 of 50
Thread Starter 
Yes, those English have an affection for their game.

I've read that at the Shah of Iran's coronation dinner, they served swans.
post #17 of 50
Speaking of peacock: In the middle ages, peacocks were often served at feasts. The skin was removed before cooking, then put back on for serving, presenting the dead birds in their full splendor.

Meat is supposed to be very dry. But I'd eat it, particularly if the beak had been gilded.
post #18 of 50
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gW-b0ytMW2M I've seen a live fish skewered on two bamboo spikes, and cut into sashimi at your table. The above is not quite so extreme, but it's sort of offputting when the food on your plate winks at you. Ha! Speaking of which... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyBYyxUe59c
post #19 of 50
I have eaten raw horse with a raw egg cracked over it, some people here in the states say I have no soul, but eh, its their loss. Horse wasnt bad. I do not like Uni, the only draw of it I see is that its supposed to be expensive. To me it tasted mild and bitter and had a sick melt on your tounge strangeness to it (Melty Earwax is the best color/taste/texture I can think of). Kani Miso was intriguing but not something I have tried yet. I do like a lot of Kansai area specialties like Takoyaki and Okonamiyaki (I guess only the Takoyaki can be considered strange for a foreigner to like). I eat the tail of tenpura shirmp. I have eaten some strange conbinations of food (ebi (shrimp) Mayo pizza was a bit on the weird side). Greek and Moroccan foods tend to contain odd bits of meat too. I eat just about anything once. Also if anyone wants to be especially adventureous there is a cook that specializes in using ingredients with certain moral and legal obections surrounding them (poodle meat was part of his last big feast he hosted) Ill find a link
post #20 of 50
double post
post #21 of 50
Maybe you were thinking of bichon frise?
post #22 of 50
ah that was it, I knew it was some french dog, I read that article a while ago
post #23 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom
I have eaten raw horse with a raw egg cracked over it, some people here in the states say I have no soul, but eh, its their loss. Horse wasnt bad.
Don't feel bad as most people lack the sophistication and adventurousness to enjoy such a delicacy.

I once had a horse hamburger (by mistake!) in France. Turned out to be quite tasty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom
I do like a lot of Kansai area specialties like Takoyaki and Okonamiyaki (I guess only the Takoyaki can be considered strange for a foreigner to like).
Neither of these would be considered unusual in any major U.S. city. The latter in particular is very accessible for non-Japanese.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom
I eat the tail of tenpura shirmp.
That's a little weird. Don't choke!
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom
Also if anyone wants to be especially adventureous there is a cook that specializes in using ingredients with certain moral and legal obections surrounding them (poodle meat was part of his last big feast he hosted)
Ill find a link
Yes, link please! Poodle meat sounds great.
post #24 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
Maybe you were thinking of bichon frise?

Thanks Kent! Kind of a long article though.
post #25 of 50
Any cannibals lurking about?
post #26 of 50
Shark finning is abhorrent, but I hear the result tastes good.

I love black pudding and the French equivalent, name of which I forget but it is Alsatian and much crumblier. A lot of people here think blood sausage is unusual.

Lutefisk!

Also, haggis is fun but the texture is disconcerting.
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by seanchai
Shark finning is abhorrent, but I hear the result tastes good.

I love black pudding and the French equivalent, name of which I forget but it is Alsatian and much crumblier. A lot of people here think blood sausage is unusual.

Lutefisk!

Also, haggis is fun but the texture is disconcerting.

Speaking of blood, every time I set foot in Hongkong, a warm dimsum dish of pork blood, curdled into a semi-solid cube, is always on the itinerary. yum yum.

May I also recommend after eating unusual food items, a warm cup of civet coffee?

Quote:
Civet coffee is coffee made from coffee cherries which have been eaten by and passed through the digestive tract of the Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus). The animals gorge on the ripe berries, and excrete partially-digested beans in their feces, which are then harvested for sale. This process takes place on the islands of Sumatra, Java and Sulawesi in the Indonesian Archipelago, in the Philippines (where the product is called Kape Alamid), in the country of Vietnam, and the coffee estates of south India.
post #28 of 50
Thread Starter 
In China's Ningpo cuisine, there is an emphasis on seafoods, and some of them can be quite unusual. The large Ningpo restaurants in Shanghai are 7 stories high, with the entire ground floor devoted to a sort of aquarium where customers choose their animal of choice. Choices included sea anemone and a rather bizzare looking creature that I can only describe as looking like a chubby muddy tapeworm.
post #29 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dormouse
Any cannibals lurking about?
South America used to have tribes that consumed human flesh.

Given the corporate destruction of the rainforests, who knows now?
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Bateman
Are these raw? Is the flavor strong or does it not taste like much?

I have not encountered raw crab anything. Kani miso is very pungent and may be an acquired taste. If you don't like uni, you'll really hate kani miso.

An American friend of mine here lived in China for a long time, and tells the story of travelling in the countryside somewhere and eating from a food vendor's cart. When he asked what it was he was eating, the vendor replied that it was mule and that every part of the mule had been used. My friend held up a piece of something and asked which part of the mule it was. The vendor replied that it was the lung.

I never miss the opportunity to bring up the tastiness of mule lung when we get together.
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