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London School of Economics - Page 3

post #31 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onix View Post


Whatever you do, don't do pure math, unless you think you're the next Terence Tao, or your love to math is comparable to that of Grigori Perelman. Well, it's a bit exaggerating, but think really hard before going into pure math.


Well I enjoy it, and I am good at it, so I don't see why I wouldn't want to do it at degree level. I think it puts me with a good chance of an IB too.

Why are you so opposed?

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorgeezy View Post

Well I enjoy it, and I am good at it, so I don't see why I wouldn't want to do it at degree level. I think it puts me with a good chance of an IB too.

Why are you so opposed?

First, by pure math, I mean doing math as the sole major, with no other major/minor such as econs, comp sci, etc. If you go for IB, you should do math in conjunction with something else.

Young math lovers often fall into this illusion of the math world. I know the amazing feeling of solving a hard math problem after days working on it. I do know, because I was one before. I did compete in IMO, and have several friends who also did. All of us ended up doing things that far from pure math. When you're young, your parents take care of almost everything, so you only need to do what you love, math. The sad thing when you grow up and keep doing math is that there will be a lot of politics, financial pressure, inter-relationship constraints, etc., that make you can no longer focus on math only.

Just some thoughts, think wisely, ask people. Very few people did make it, that's great for them. But for the majority, the math world is not that beautiful when you grow up.
post #33 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onix View Post


First, by pure math, I mean doing math as the sole major, with no other major/minor such as econs, comp sci, etc. If you go for IB, you should do math in conjunction with something else.
Young math lovers often fall into this illusion of the math world. I know the amazing feeling of solving a hard math problem after days working on it. I do know, because I was one before. I did compete in IMO, and have several friends who also did. All of us ended up doing things that far from pure math. When you're young, your parents take care of almost everything, so you only need to do what you love, math. The sad thing when you grow up and keep doing math is that there will be a lot of politics, financial pressure, inter-relationship constraints, etc., that make you can no longer focus on math only.
Just some thoughts, think wisely, ask people. Very few people did make it, that's great for them. But for the majority, the math world is not that beautiful when you grow up.


Very well put.

 

Well I do want to work for a brokerage firm and I figured a maths degree would teach me to think and I could get hired. Though, I know it isn't just that easy and have made a pretty decent contact who can get me the experience.

 

That being said, my application to uni has already been made, but I could quite possibly change my degree to a joint degree involving Mathematics if I have been accepted for Mathematics I think.

 

Out of interest, where and what did you study?

 

Later on in life, perhaps with less financial pressures I think it would be cool to go into the research regarding the reverse engineering of the brain, but I don't know whether I would possess the necessarily skills.

post #34 of 47
People with maths degrees tend to gravitate towards actuarial / analytical work in finance; that's especially pronounced in insurance: the entry pay is amongst the highest but it tends to have a glass ceiling.

If you want to be a broker I don't know why you're bothering with maths?
post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 

Everyone in the real world told me that I should stick with maths and that employers will appreciate that a maths degree teaches you to think blah blah.

 

FOK.

 

Ah well, at least if I did make the LSE offer it would be Math with Econ xD

post #36 of 47
To be honest, nobody really cares what you're degree's in; all the pep talk that teachers give you: 'university is a necessity' or, 'maths will teach you X Y & Z as a personal - read unquantifiable - skill' is mostly verbiage. That being said, if you're looking to get into actuarial work then maths will be a necessity and you should definitely do it.
post #37 of 47
Thread Starter 

If I got a UCL offer I would probably ask to be switched to math with econ there too anyway.

 

So basically, doing maths won't put me at a distinct disadvantage when applying to brokerage firms compared to economics?

 

I probably won't stay with maths my whole life anyway, literally get my first job then just be addicted to work :')

post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorgeezy View Post

Everyone in the real world told me that I should stick with maths and that employers will appreciate that a maths degree teaches you to think blah blah.

FOK.

Ah well, at least if I did make the LSE offer it would be Math with Econ xD

Even though I did say that don't do solely math, I must also clarify that you should stick with math somehow to sharpen your analytical skills. Math is one of those skills that are very valuable, and cannot be learned when you get older. Many other crucial skills (both soft and hard) can be learned later in life, but not analytical skills. So, DO sharpen your math, but not just math.

Anyway, I think you're heading to the right directions given your posts so far. Good luck.
post #39 of 47
Thread Starter 

Thanks man, I appreciate everyone's genuine concern and thought put into their posts.

 

Can't wait to get my tie in the post too!

post #40 of 47
Don't discount Nottingham because of gun crime - the stats are very misleading. I lived (and studied) there at the time of the worst 'trouble', and it was blown out of proportion. The main factor is a historical administrative quirk which draws the limits of the 'City of Nottingham' to include all the inner city poor areas but few of the safe, leafy suburbs.The headline grabbing statistics compared gun crimes per 1000 from the City of Nottingham with gun crimes per 1000 from other cities where the whole urban area was part of the survey. If gun crime stats had taken the whole urban area of Nottingham and compared it with the whole urban areas of other cities, Nottingham (except for maybe one or two years when there was a spate of gang shootings) would have been statisitcally unremarkable.
post #41 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangfastic View Post

Don't discount Nottingham because of gun crime - the stats are very misleading. I lived (and studied) there at the time of the worst 'trouble', and it was blown out of proportion. The main factor is a historical administrative quirk which draws the limits of the 'City of Nottingham' to include all the inner city poor areas but few of the safe, leafy suburbs.The headline grabbing statistics compared gun crimes per 1000 from the City of Nottingham with gun crimes per 1000 from other cities where the whole urban area was part of the survey. If gun crime stats had taken the whole urban area of Nottingham and compared it with the whole urban areas of other cities, Nottingham (except for maybe one or two years when there was a spate of gang shootings) would have been statisitcally unremarkable.


Oh, I know. I don't live too far from Birmingham and it really doesn't phase me icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

 

If I don't get the A* in A2 Maths I have to go to Nottingham anyway as it will be my insurance aha!

post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorgeezy View Post



Oh, I know. I don't live too far from Birmingham and it really doesn't phase me icon_gu_b_slayer%5B1%5D.gif

If I don't get the A* in A2 Maths I have to go to Nottingham anyway as it will be my insurance aha!

Nottingham was my insurance choice too and it certainly didn't ruin my life going there. There's a lot of student life, it's a safe city and it's a lot cheaper than London and Bath.

Good luck with your results!
post #43 of 47
Remember you get more loan for going to London, I don't know if you'll have more for what you need to spend than Bath and Nottingham but you shouldn't be too short for cash there.
post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Humphrey Appleby View Post

Remember you get more loan for going to London, I don't know if you'll have more for what you need to spend than Bath and Nottingham but you shouldn't be too short for cash there.


The cost has never really been one of the significant factors in my choice anyway, it's not a big deal when you're talking about the rest of your life, right?

 

So many of my peers don't understand how the new (or old) system works and I know some very capable people are going to live at home and go to a uni that is below them just because of "costs" devil.gif

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorgeezy View Post



The cost has never really been one of the significant factors in my choice anyway
, it's not a big deal when you're talking about the rest of your life, right?

So many of my peers don't understand how the new (or old) system works and I know some very capable people are going to live at home and go to a uni that is below them just because of "costs" devil.gif

It will be when you need to buy food, transport and a place to live. Sheffield > all biggrin.gif

Edit: if I didn't want to move back to Yorkshire I'd have stayed at home and commuted to Birmingham or Manchester. If the university is just as good it makes sense to save the £4k a year or whatever you spend living on your own and take the £4k loan.
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