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Prometheus (Ridley Scott's Alien "Prequel" ) - Page 45

post #661 of 689
I do think it could have been cooler if she survived that scene though... just to make it to her pod. I can totally see her character thinking, "two years of life in the pod for me, or quite a bit less with Shaw and myself together.... Hmmm, it took two years to get here so... sorry Shaw!" Then, instant karma...
post #662 of 689

A meandering, illogical, and at times idiotic mess of a movie. I can't bother to list all the stupidity, but can someone explain why the captain and the two pilots raised their hands as they crashed into the ship? Happy to be out of this movie and on their way to Club Med? 

 

lefty

 

P,S. fanboys try to explain every inconsistency: http://www.prometheus-movie.com/community/forums/topic/8122 

post #663 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty 
[haters gonna hate]

-I sign my posts

satisfied.gifpeepwall[1].gif
post #664 of 689
I'm disappointed in Ridley Scott. This movie wasn't bad, but it wasn't up to par either. I hope it was just a hiccup for Ridley, as his movies are usually well done.

Then again, MIchael Mann did a couple of awesome movies only to slide into idiocy. Are these dudes just getting senile now?
post #665 of 689
A good write up on how David relates to Lawrence.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/why-does-david-identify-h_b_1598998.html
Quote:
Lawrence of Arabia is a story about a man entering a world he doesn't understand, gaining the respect of its people, and learning to become like them. Lawrence doesn't really fit into any society -- he's as uncomfortable dealing with the British as he is alien among the Arabs. There's also a magical, heady quality to his depiction in the film. He's constantly surprising the people around him, knocking them off balance, and earning their praise and respect. He's an outsider who swoops into a problem and solves it with his wits and bizarre perspectives. Intelligence and inhuman endurance are two of Lawrence's great assets. He suffers great indignity, his value to history and to society is overlooked or lost, and he responds by nurturing a heightened opinion of his own importance.

I'm guessing that David empathizes with Lawrence and imagines or aspires to have Lawrence's positive qualities. He's intelligent and enduring in the way that Lawrence is. He's an outsider who can never really be accepted by his society. And, like Lawrence, he's arguably better than all the people who consider themselves superior to him: he's smarter, more resilient, and unafraid of death. He's constantly being put down by everyone he interacts with, and because of this "second-class-citizen" status, he probably imagines that his contributions to the mission are being tragically overlooked in the same way that Lawrence's legacy dwindled away. Like Lawrence, one of his greatest wishes is to have his magnificence recognized.

Most intriguing is David's soft, rhythmic repetition of Lawrence's famous line of advice: "The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts." I think David watches this because he's studying Lawrence's brand of gallant showmanship. He knows he's superior; he wants to show it to everyone else. He wants to be praised. (And, in fact, there's an interview here where Fassbender talks about David's desire to be praised.

David gets his chance to swashbuckle like Peter O'Toole when Shaw is struck by the sandstorm: he leaps decisively out the side of the ship, saves Holloway, Shaw, and the head, gives them that cocky little "OK!" hand signal, and then reels them back in. His confident, eager body language shows how desperately he wants to show off. But he's not showered with praise afterward: everyone just ignores him.

David's final act before his injury also demonstrates his hunger to be praised. We don't really know what he says to the Engineer, but, like Lawrence, he suddenly bears the burden of a translator/communicator between two cultures. Finally, he's the focal point of the entire mission -- and the look of pure bliss on his face when the Engineer pats him on the head is heartbreaking, particularly since the Engineer's next act is to rip his head off. The culmination of all his work arrives, and he's not praised -- he's reduced to junk.

So: David has probably consciously recognized similarities between his life and Lawrence's. His ego develops along lines similar to Lawrence's. He then heightens the similarity even further by deliberately aping O'Toole's depiction of Lawrence. To David, Lawrence is both a mentor and a mirror.

Was David's hair a different color in the very beginning? Did he color it to look like Lawrence?
post #666 of 689
The archeologists were boneheads and not believable as experts of any kind. The visuals were nice, but overall I found it to be a bit meh, though the Lawrence/David thing was amusing as someone that loved Lawrence of Arabia. I also didn't like Charlize Theron in it at all.
post #667 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

A good write up on how David relates to Lawrence.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/why-does-david-identify-h_b_1598998.html
Quote:
Lawrence of Arabia is a story about a man entering a world he doesn't understand, gaining the respect of its people, and learning to become like them. Lawrence doesn't really fit into any society -- he's as uncomfortable dealing with the British as he is alien among the Arabs. There's also a magical, heady quality to his depiction in the film. He's constantly surprising the people around him, knocking them off balance, and earning their praise and respect. He's an outsider who swoops into a problem and solves it with his wits and bizarre perspectives. Intelligence and inhuman endurance are two of Lawrence's great assets. He suffers great indignity, his value to history and to society is overlooked or lost, and he responds by nurturing a heightened opinion of his own importance.

I'm guessing that David empathizes with Lawrence and imagines or aspires to have Lawrence's positive qualities. He's intelligent and enduring in the way that Lawrence is. He's an outsider who can never really be accepted by his society. And, like Lawrence, he's arguably better than all the people who consider themselves superior to him: he's smarter, more resilient, and unafraid of death. He's constantly being put down by everyone he interacts with, and because of this "second-class-citizen" status, he probably imagines that his contributions to the mission are being tragically overlooked in the same way that Lawrence's legacy dwindled away. Like Lawrence, one of his greatest wishes is to have his magnificence recognized.

Most intriguing is David's soft, rhythmic repetition of Lawrence's famous line of advice: "The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts." I think David watches this because he's studying Lawrence's brand of gallant showmanship. He knows he's superior; he wants to show it to everyone else. He wants to be praised. (And, in fact, there's an interview here where Fassbender talks about David's desire to be praised.

David gets his chance to swashbuckle like Peter O'Toole when Shaw is struck by the sandstorm: he leaps decisively out the side of the ship, saves Holloway, Shaw, and the head, gives them that cocky little "OK!" hand signal, and then reels them back in. His confident, eager body language shows how desperately he wants to show off. But he's not showered with praise afterward: everyone just ignores him.

David's final act before his injury also demonstrates his hunger to be praised. We don't really know what he says to the Engineer, but, like Lawrence, he suddenly bears the burden of a translator/communicator between two cultures. Finally, he's the focal point of the entire mission -- and the look of pure bliss on his face when the Engineer pats him on the head is heartbreaking, particularly since the Engineer's next act is to rip his head off. The culmination of all his work arrives, and he's not praised -- he's reduced to junk.

So: David has probably consciously recognized similarities between his life and Lawrence's. His ego develops along lines similar to Lawrence's. He then heightens the similarity even further by deliberately aping O'Toole's depiction of Lawrence. To David, Lawrence is both a mentor and a mirror.

Was David's hair a different color in the very beginning? Did he color it to look like Lawrence?

This is a very interesting exegesis, but it raises still another plot hole - if David is an android, why does he have any desires or feelings? If androids have feelings and desires, why do all the humans act as if androids might as well be toasters?
post #668 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

This is a very interesting exegesis, but it raises still another plot hole - if David is an android, why does he have any desires or feelings? If androids have feelings and desires, why do all the humans act as if androids might as well be toasters?

The androids in the Alien universe have always been very sentient, self-aware, and somewhat emotional. I think some humans' deriding attitude towards them is supposed to be a form of "racism".
post #669 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by ken View Post

The androids in the Alien universe have always been very sentient, self-aware, and somewhat emotional. I think some humans' deriding attitude towards them is supposed to be a form of "racism".

I re-watched the film tonight and must say that I enjoyed it more on the second viewing and was less annoyed by the film's faults. Sure the faults were still there, but in the absence of my huge expectation on the premier night and the subsequent heated online debate, I enjoyed the film a lot.

Good point about the androids. In Alien, Ash's behavior and slavery to the Weyland directive made him a very malevolent character indeed. Later models - Bishop had behavioural inhibitors and as such Bishop was a very strong, very good character in Aliens.

^ As David was effectively the first Android model, there would be a huge amount of bugs to iron out, and I took his actions to be a lot like the Replicants in Blade Runner - he was created and thrown into the world with very little time to make sense of it. On top of that, on second viewing of the film it seems even more clear that his malignant behaviour is directly attributable to Weyland's programming. So much so that David resents him for it - "doesn't everyone want their parents dead"

^ With Weyland dead, David's attitude seems to change a lot at the end of the film, and he also bargains for his own self preservation - again perhaps quite a human emotion
post #670 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

A meandering, illogical, and at times idiotic mess of a movie. I can't bother to list all the stupidity, but can someone explain why the captain and the two pilots raised their hands as they crashed into the ship? Happy to be out of this movie and on their way to Club Med? 

lefty

P,S. fanboys try to explain every inconsistency: http://www.prometheus-movie.com/community/forums/topic/8122 

+1. Just saw this turd. The list of plot holes is large enough without even talking about the number of cliches and just generally awful script. My eyes got a workout from rolling so much.

For one thing, I don't like it when people preach to me. I definitely don't like it when Hollywood script writers who can't even tie a plot together -- let alone form a coherent philosophy -- put existentialism and religion together in a movie as juvenile as this.

Horrible, horrible movie.
post #671 of 689
post #672 of 689
I found David to be the only entertaining part of the movie.
post #673 of 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neo_Version 7 View Post

I found David to be the only entertaining part of the movie.

 +1

post #674 of 689
Meh.
post #675 of 689
Finally saw this.... They could have done a far better job telling the Space Jesus story IMO. Also, the giant plot holes were really lame, but I guess what can you expect when at the last minute right before shooting the suits in the studio come at Scott with "Ya know....our focus groups are telling us the Alien franchise is stale, so why don't ya just, you know, remove all the Xenomorphs and replace it with some bullshit space goo"

"Oh yeah, ya know where Dr. Shaw is impregnated with an Alien and she goes the med pod to remove it, and while she's healing for 8 hours after ejecting the Alien, going in and out of consciousness watching it terrorize the ship until she's completely healed...?? Well, instead let's have it be a big squid, not eject from the pod, and have her run out of the pod IMMEDIATELY after major surgery. That's way better"

Also, good call cutting out the conversation between David/Weyland/Engineer....that would have given away a smidgeon of the plot, we can't have that!
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