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Romantic Europe meets NYC: the ROBERT GELLER thread - Page 3

post #31 of 6250
They do look pretty close this time actually, but I'm still not sure about the waist.
Last season they had jeans with 15.5-16" waists and 6.5" leg openings measured as 14.5" and 5.5"
I have the Ash jeans coming tomorrow so we'll see.
post #32 of 6250
I love the layering in all of his collections, i.e. the longer tank tops under a tee under a button down under a lightweight jacket. It's a cool look and he's definitely a great stylist.

If anyone has a cadet jacket (preferably olive) in a 48 that they want to get rid of, get at me...
post #33 of 6250
post #34 of 6250
Same here too, I wear my Petro leather constantly. through spring and fall.
post #35 of 6250
my favorite designer

most other designers imo put out stuff you can't casually wear without looking like a sore thumb.
post #36 of 6250
i hope to get my hands on more accessories. predominately hats and scarves. Too bad my hair is so chunky now that it feels impossible to put a hat on.
post #37 of 6250
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by APK View Post

Geller seems like one of the more accessible non-heritage brands discussed around these parts. He's definitely one of the more polarizing designers around here. You've got folks who seem to scoop up several items from each collection, while others seem to note their distaste for Geller on a routine basis. There was a good Geller discussion from both sides of the fence in the RFT thread last spring that brought forth some concrete pros and cons about the label.
I fall somewhere in the middle. I'm not sure I've seen a RG collection that hasn't included at least a couple of items I'd like to have in my closet. The laced-cuff overcoat from F/W '10 was the sort of understated, yet attention-grabbing product Geller is capable of when he gets it right. On the other hand, most collections are also good for some real swings and misses. Stuff such as the student cardigan are examples of what happens when Geller gets too cute with his designs.
I do love the fabrics the man uses for his mainline stuff and don't mind gushing about that. That's really all I'm usually looking for with this whole crazy jawnz thing. I'll admire the really balls-of-steel-level boldness from the sidelines, but when it comes to my own wardrobe, I prefer sharp design with good fabrics. Geller usually meets that criteria.

I went back and looked at that discussion. Someone in there made the very good point that it's the buyers who are responsible for a store only carrying dip-dyed sweatshirts and that sort of stuff. I'm pretty certain I remember Geller saying in an interview that he found buyers' preferences a little frustrating. He said something like he has a showroom full of these great romantic pieces and they go straight to the jeans and tees because they know those items will sell. (Tried to find the interview just now but I couldn't locate it; if anyone happens to know where it is that would be awesome). There were also complaints that some Geller stuff is just too over-the-top to wear. But that isn't a criticism of the design really, it's more about what the individual is comfortable wearing.

Personally, one of the things I like about Geller is that within the same collection there are awesome standout pieces and then more run-of-the-mill stuff that anyone would be comfortable wearing, but that still has something unique about it. Geller's buttondowns, for example, are mostly just regular shirts with a good cut, made of nice fabrics and with cool details like covered buttons. Or the fencing shirt, which is unusual but not particularly attention-calling. One of my favorite Geller shirts is just a light denim with a contrast collar in dark denim. I could wear that every day and make it look different every time depending on how I wear it. But it's still just a simple shirt. A lot of the runway looks come together in the styling, but they can totally be deconstructed and the individual pieces used in more conservative, everyday looks. This look below is probably more dandyish than most guys would want to wear, but if you ditch the cumberbund and the scarf, you still have an awesome (easily wearable) jacket over a cool shirt and jeans.

480
post #38 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

I went back and looked at that discussion. Someone in there made the very good point that it's the buyers who are responsible for a store only carrying dip-dyed sweatshirts and that sort of stuff. I'm pretty certain I remember Geller saying in an interview that he found buyers' preferences a little frustrating. He said something like he has a showroom full of these great romantic pieces and they go straight to the jeans and tees because they know those items will sell. (Tried to find the interview just now but I couldn't locate it; if anyone happens to know where it is that would be awesome). There were also complaints that some Geller stuff is just too over-the-top to wear. But that isn't a criticism of the design really, it's more about what the individual is comfortable wearing.
Quote:
The collections that we’ve pushed the most are the ones that have not only got the least amount of buys, but the ones I’ve got the least personal wears out of as well. So in the end, you keep criticising stores and customers for being boring, but look at what I’m wearing: pants and a t-shirt. You can push it and style it and put it together in a cool way, and that’s how men make their clothes special and unique. We don’t want big, crazy cape things.

That would be frustrating as a designer, since this behavior pulls you between designing what's going to satiate your artistic vision and making what's actually going to pay the bills. You can design a lot of cool stuff that gets enthusiasts all frenzied, but sits around gathering dust, or you can design safe, "high quality" staples that will move off the shelves, but probably get you labeled as a boring designer.

Still, there's justification in not straying too far left of center in designing the majority of your collection. I mean, even guys like us who really pay attention to this stuff have our share of days where we probably just want to wear something simple such as the pants + tee.
post #39 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

I went back and looked at that discussion. Someone in there made the very good point that it's the buyers who are responsible for a store only carrying dip-dyed sweatshirts and that sort of stuff. I'm pretty certain I remember Geller saying in an interview that he found buyers' preferences a little frustrating. He said something like he has a showroom full of these great romantic pieces and they go straight to the jeans and tees because they know those items will sell. (Tried to find the interview just now but I couldn't locate it; if anyone happens to know where it is that would be awesome). There were also complaints that some Geller stuff is just too over-the-top to wear. But that isn't a criticism of the design really, it's more about what the individual is comfortable wearing.
Personally, one of the things I like about Geller is that within the same collection there are awesome standout pieces and then more run-of-the-mill stuff that anyone would be comfortable wearing, but that still has something unique about it. Geller's buttondowns, for example, are mostly just regular shirts with a good cut, made of nice fabrics and with cool details like covered buttons. Or the fencing shirt, which is unusual but not particularly attention-calling. One of my favorite Geller shirts is just a light denim with a contrast collar in dark denim. I could wear that every day and make it look different every time depending on how I wear it. But it's still just a simple shirt. A lot of the runway looks come together in the styling, but they can totally be deconstructed and the individual pieces used in more conservative, everyday looks. This look below is probably more dandyish than most guys would want to wear, but if you ditch the cumberbund and the scarf, you still have an awesome (easily wearable) jacket over a cool shirt and jeans.
480

I agree with a lot of this but DAMN what season is that jacket from / where can I get it right now
post #40 of 6250
Thread Starter 
Jacket is from fall 2011. I have no clue who carried it though.
post #41 of 6250
F/W11, wasn't produced since I didn't even see it stocked in Japan. Time to hit Geller on the cell Bows!
post #42 of 6250
I wish Geller went up to size 54... frown.gif
post #43 of 6250
You have the scarred cardigan from F/W '10, right, Nil? Must be frustrating that only select pieces, generally knits, will conceivably fit you. I'm probably on the cusp myself, since I really dislike any pulling across the back, which bumps me up to a 52 in most of his stuff.
post #44 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by APK View Post

You have the scarred cardigan from F/W '10, right, Nil? Must be frustrating that only select pieces, generally knits, will conceivably fit you. I'm probably on the cusp myself, since I really dislike any pulling across the back, which bumps me up to a 52 in most of his stuff.

Yeah, I do. It fits oversized and is super stretchy, so it works for me. And yes, it's rather frustrating.
post #45 of 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desi View Post

F/W11, wasn't produced since I didn't even see it stocked in Japan. Time to hit Geller on the cell Bows!

Hmm, might have to hit him up for real; the best I can
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