or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Koji Suzuki
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Koji Suzuki - Page 3

post #31 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by the.chikor View Post

Please contact Mr. Suzuki for prices. I am sorry that I did not answer your question about the time. I answered it for another member in this post. It was about 2 years.

2 years + travel reveals quite a passion and dedication. I've considered a similar scenario with Delos, but for the cost of travel I might as well try JLP (which I haven't been able to justify the price, yet).
post #32 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Son Of Saphir View Post

Need more close picture of welt stitching and waist.
Shoe is very very good. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

I know, but I have been very busy. I was lukcy to post the pictues that I did.
post #33 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Son Of Saphir View Post

Can you describe fit of both maker?
Who maker do best fit?

Great Question SoS. I would say that they both fit excellent. In fact, I have never experienced any shoe maker who has made me a better fitting shoe than Koji or Anthony. By far, both of these gentlemen are perfectionists, which is demonstrated, for example, in the fit of their respective product.

Anthony spent a year, I believe, in Germany attending an orthopaedic shoe making school. One thing that he incorporated in the shoes that he made for me was an orthopaedic insole. This insole is padded and form fit to the bottom of my feet. It is very comfortable and also has pragmatic results.

The plantar suport in the metatarsal area gently elevates the foot, bringing my lateral toes inward. This prevents my outside toe from rubbing on the lateral aspect of the shoe when I walk. Without this feature, I am yet to have a shoe maker produce a pair of shoes that fit me properly (Although, I forewarn all the shoemakers, who all respond in kind that they will have no problems fitting my feet. Their predictions/assertions, I have found, have ultimately failed in part.).

Besides this special feature, the shoe fits outstanding-for me, as perfect as humanly possible. Keep in mind that nothing fits perfectly.

Koji, does not put the orthopaedic insole into my shoes. I was not aware that he he had the knoweldge, until after my first pair from him. I asked him to do it in the pair that I just posted, however, he did not do so.

Despite this shortcoming, however, I will not send the shoes back because they still fit equally as well as Anthony's shoes. Koji's shoes are obviously not as comfortable in the footbed area without the padded insole, but they fit every bit as well otherwise. Anthony made the shoes fit me a bit tigher than Koji in the thoat, collar, vamp areas, although remarkably, still not too tight.

Koji made the heels fit a bit tighter than Anthony, but they too are not too tight (meaning no pain, aggitation, or physical manifestation, i.e., redness, tenderness, blistering, etc.) Koji made my vamp noticeably looser than Anthony on this pair. Both have found a way to preclude irritation of my outer toes, which normally gives shoe makers problems.

As far as the discussion that members have posted on the varrying or opposing style compared between the two makers, I must say that they leave out one substantial factor for consideration-I asked for the different styles.

It was not the shoe makers who chose these two models of shoes. To more accurately compare the two makers, one would have to compare the same model of shoe by the two respective makers or allow them to make the style of shoe to their own individual preference, not the customers.

The only main characteristics of style that I could "generally" comment on are 1) finish of the welt and outside portion of the heel lifts; and 2) the toe shapes.

Koji prefers to finish the exposed portion of the welt and heel lifts in a much shinier manner than Anthony. I have also noticed that Koji has an affinity for certain toe shapes and Anthony others distinctly different from Koji's preference.

However, these are just preferences that I have noticed. If a customer makes a request that differs from their respective preferences, of course each maker will accomodate the customer.

TC
post #34 of 71
Thread Starter 
Poorsod,

You have an excellent point. I contemplated this same consideration prior to embarking on my "satorial globetrotting expedition," as another forum member has mentioned in the past. I made the decision to commission Anthony knowing full well the cost/benefit analysis of the equation (figuratively speaking). I have no regrets for the cost. Their is more for me to the bespoke shoe than the just the end product. Indubitibly, this is an individual opinion that others will contest. I would say only embark on the journey if you have a personal desire to travel down that road.
post #35 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

2 years + travel reveals quite a passion and dedication. I've considered a similar scenario with Delos, but for the cost of travel I might as well try JLP (which I haven't been able to justify the price, yet).

you mean through their n.y. store?
post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by the.chikor View Post

Anthony spent a year, I believe, in Germany attending an orthopaedic shoe making school. One thing that he incorporated in the shoes that he made for me was an orthopaedic insole. This insole is padded and form fit to the bottom of my feet. It is very comfortable and also has pragmatic results.
The plantar suport in the metatarsal area gently elevates the foot, bringing my lateral toes inward. This prevents my outside toe from rubbing on the lateral aspect of the shoe when I walk. Without this feature, I am yet to have a shoe maker produce a pair of shoes that fit me properly (Although, I forewarn all the shoemakers, who all respond in kind that they will have no problems fitting my feet. Their predictions/assertions, I have found, have ultimately failed in part.).
TC

Interesting the above, T.C., as I have the same issue - a slight bony protuberance on my fifth metatarsal head that required "1 mm" adjustment by a mutual bespoke maker we have used.

Despite this adjustment, which did not alter the shape of the shoe significantly, the pain after three hours was only 50% less. However, I have broken in the pair the way Silvano Lattanzi recommends, and now they no longer have any pain even with wearing them all day (up to 10 hours).

In case you are wondering, Lattanzi, being the obsessive he is, recommends breaking his shoes in by wearing them, say 3 hours a day for the first month. Then 5 for the next month. Then 7, and so on.

I wonder if you have "broken in" those that the makers said “fits,” and how they feel now?

- M
post #37 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

you mean through their n.y. store?

Yes
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

Interesting the above, T.C., as I have the same issue - a slight bony protuberance on my fifth metatarsal head that required "1 mm" adjustment by a mutual bespoke maker we have used.
Despite this adjustment, which did not alter the shape of the shoe significantly, the pain after three hours was only 50% less. However, I have broken in the pair the way Silvano Lattanzi recommends, and now they no longer have any pain even with wearing them all day (up to 10 hours).
In case you are wondering, Lattanzi, being the obsessive he is, recommends breaking his shoes in by wearing them, say 3 hours a day for the first month. Then 5 for the next month. Then 7, and so on.
I wonder if you have "broken in" those that the makers said “fits,” and how they feel now?
- M

Have you tried wearing a wet sock to expedite the break in process? I found the technique in the SF archives. The idea is that moisture accelerates leather stretching. I tried it once with shoes which were too tight in the heel. I wet only the heel of the sock and wore the shoes for a few hours while the sock dried. I did it only when I was sitting at the desk because I find wet skin chafes more easily too - walking while wearing a wet sock would probably chafe my skin too easily.

Alternatively you could ask for more adjustments from the maker. I did that once but found the shoes looser than I wanted.
post #38 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Have you tried wearing a wet sock to expedite the break in process?

Hmm, methought that moisture is skin's friend while it's alive, but when it's dead (leather), moisture is its enemy?

- M
post #39 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

Hmm, methought that moisture is skin's friend while it's alive, but when it's dead (leather), moisture is its enemy?
- M

hmmh, are you serious about your assumption?
post #40 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post


Alternatively you could ask for more adjustments from the maker. I did that once but found the shoes looser than I wanted.

ooops, they should have conformed back, though, did they?
post #41 of 71
Grail shoe maker but a 2 year wait? Longer than a Ferrari.
post #42 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by whnay. View Post

Grail shoe maker but a 2 year wait? Longer than a Ferrari.

About the same, though, for Ambrosi.
post #43 of 71
Aren't they made in Korea now? Longer distance to travel....
post #44 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

Hmm, methought that moisture is skin's friend while it's alive, but when it's dead (leather), moisture is its enemy?
- M

The idea was that skin (dead or alive) is softer and more malleable when wet. You get the part of the shoe that is bothering you softer, and then use your foot to mold it into the correct shape.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

ooops, they should have conformed back, though, did they?

It worked that one time. The shoes were purchased at steep discount (from one of the legendary Paul Stuart sales) and I was willing to experiment.

For bespoke shoes, I was more risk adverse and sent it back for adjustment. In retrospect, the adjustment went a little bit too far the other way and I wonder if I should tried loosening it myself. Such is life.
post #45 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post


For bespoke shoes, I was more risk adverse and sent it back for adjustment. In retrospect, the adjustment went a little bit too far the other way and I wonder if I should tried loosening it myself. Such is life.

ah, ok.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Koji Suzuki