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What's this on my shoe? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
I was referring to the Saphir Renomat product (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/leather-cleaner-renomat-saphir,20), which indeed is a cleaner. On the other hand the cleaning agent in Saphir Renovator (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/shoe-polish-renovator-saphir-medaille-dor,522_) is very mild. The only issues I have experienced with the Renovator is that over application can make it difficult to get a good shine. Renovator is a wonderful product and does a great job of nourishing the leather on new and old shoes alike. The Renomat and the Renovator are easier to use and to ensure the expected results from the use. Neutral waxes and creams on the other hand need very careful use and results might surprise, in an unpleasant way.

Another caution. If the antiquing on your shoes has been applied after the shoes have been made, don't remember what the technical name for that finish is, then any Saphir polish, cream, or renovator with turpentine will strip the antiquing. This happened to my goodyear welted Santonis and I had to send them back to get them refinished.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poshak Man View Post

Another caution. If the antiquing on your shoes has been applied after the shoes have been made, don't remember what the technical name for that finish is, then any Saphir polish, cream, or renovator with turpentine will strip the antiquing. This happened to my goodyear welted Santonis and I had to send them back to get them refinished.

Crust leather.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poshak Man View Post

I was referring to the Saphir Renomat product (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/leather-cleaner-renomat-saphir,20), which indeed is a cleaner. On the other hand the cleaning agent in Saphir Renovator (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/shoe-polish-renovator-saphir-medaille-dor,522_) is very mild. The only issues I have experienced with the Renovator is that over application can make it difficult to get a good shine. Renovator is a wonderful product and does a great job of nourishing the leather on new and old shoes alike. The Renomat and the Renovator are easier to use and to ensure the expected results from the use. Neutral waxes and creams on the other hand need very careful use and results might surprise, in an unpleasant way.
Another caution. If the antiquing on your shoes has been applied after the shoes have been made, don't remember what the technical name for that finish is, then any Saphir polish, cream, or renovator with turpentine will strip the antiquing. This happened to my goodyear welted Santonis and I had to send them back to get them refinished.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northampton Novice View Post

Crust leather.

Whoa..... I just got a pair of Edward Green Inverness in Antique Burgandy and a pair of G&G Grants in VIntage Oak, do you think it's okay to use Saphir products on them? I was about to order a bunch of Saphir creams and waxes but maybe not....
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd I/O View Post


Whoa..... I just got a pair of Edward Green Inverness in Antique Burgandy and a pair of G&G Grants in VIntage Oak, do you think it's okay to use Saphir products on them? I was about to order a bunch of Saphir creams and waxes but maybe not....


I will take them off your hands so you can remain worry free!

 

post #20 of 27
Why polish new shoes?

Were they dirty upon delivery?
post #21 of 27
I only had that problem with Saphir products used on Santoni shoes with crust leather. I have since then been using Santoni branded shoe wax on Santoni shoes without any problems. Not sure what is special about Santoni waxes but may be, they do not contain any solvent.

I have had no issues with Saphir products on Lobbs, Edward Greens, Crockett & Jones etc. But be careful when using neutral cream and polishes of any brand on any brand shoes.

Hopefully, knowledgeable members can shed some light on why Saphir polishes do this to shoes made with crust leather and what other shoes are made with crust leather.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poshak Man View Post

I was referring to the Saphir Renomat product (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/leather-cleaner-renomat-saphir,20), which indeed is a cleaner. On the other hand the cleaning agent in Saphir Renovator (http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/shoe-polish-renovator-saphir-medaille-dor,522_) is very mild. The only issues I have experienced with the Renovator is that over application can make it difficult to get a good shine. Renovator is a wonderful product and does a great job of nourishing the leather on new and old shoes alike. The Renomat and the Renovator are easier to use and to ensure the expected results from the use. Neutral waxes and creams on the other hand need very careful use and results might surprise, in an unpleasant way.
Another caution. If the antiquing on your shoes has been applied after the shoes have been made, don't remember what the technical name for that finish is, then any Saphir polish, cream, or renovator with turpentine will strip the antiquing. This happened to my goodyear welted Santonis and I had to send them back to get them refinished.

so technical spoken, you're an idiot?
post #23 of 27
^^
I had referred to 'knowledgeable' members in my previous post. It was not a reference to any one specifically. My apologies, if my post and the reference insulted you as a member.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northampton Novice View Post


The only reason I mention this, Reno has solvents as it's a cleaner

so why do people recommend it to noobs to use it on their new shoes with zero experience? i know that you know, btw.


Plenty of bad advice on here. Anything Revolving posts comes to mind.
post #25 of 27
I can't think of a wax or cream that has wax in it that does not also have solvents in it. These solvents make hard wax (generally carnuba) into a paste or a cream by "solving" the wax. The solvents are universally volatile and intended to evaporate, leaving the wax closer to its original, solid, state.

To the extent that any finish...antiqued or not...is dependent on wax, solvents represent a clear and present danger. Even water can be a solvent for some "top coats" based on acrylic waxes.

Thin to win.
post #26 of 27
i dont know what it is but it makes me frown.gif

as noted, find a good cobbler and hope for the best. if he can fix it, ask him what it was and what he did so you know for the future.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post

Plenty of bad advice on here. Anything Revolving posts comes to mind.

Plenty of idiots too...
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