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Kitchen Tools - Page 16

post #226 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Speaking of seasoning... I didn't see this posted here, but apologies if it's a repeat: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/

The science seemed legit, and none of my actual scientist friends called bullshit on it.

Nice, will try this.
post #227 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post


i smell a column coming on. i think steady and even are very closely related. the heat is retained and radiated (theoretically, anyway) across an even surface, rather than a quick heat/cool you get with a good conductor such as copper. can anyone give me a good explanation of this so i don't actually ahve to do my job?

I disagree that steady and even are related, at least as the words have been used here. What is at issue, scientifically, I think, is thermal conductivity.

Cast iron does not conduct heat well, at least, not as well as aluminum or copper or steel. This means it is less likely to transfer heat, either in or out, even to its neighboring cast iron molecules. When a section of cast iron pan is right over the burner, it is more apt to absorb the heat and keep it for itself than it is to pass that heat to its neighbors, or give it up to the surrounding air... or food. Hence its uneven heating on the stovetop.

But this same unwillingness to give up its heat easily is an advantage in the dutch oven situation, where its low thermal conductivity makes it less likely to cool down with the heat cycles of the oven, and it acts as a buffer of sorts to the surrounding oven temperatures - leading to a steadier temperature within the dutch oven. Its comparatively high mass probably also aids in this heat retention and buffering.

In this way, it's almost like an insulator, or a jacket, keeping the inside warm even as the outside air might fluctuate. It does not easily conduct heat out of the dutch oven when the outside air is cooler, nor does it easily allow heat in to the DO when the outside air is a bit warmer.
post #228 of 290
Speaking of kitchen tools: next time you go to Paris, don't go to Charvet, go to Dehillerin. They (the men in blue dustcoats with pencils behind their ears) sell pots the size of bathtubs and spoons the size of paddles. And small stuff too. smile.gif Old-school old-school.

fbWs8.jpg
post #229 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjr4884 View Post

The difference in temperature is not good for the pan, so i've read.  Going from 500 degrees to 130 under "hot" running water is not good for the pan to change in temperature that quickly.  Rather, I'll let it cool and clean it under warm water.  Its still easy to clean, I have a bristle brush that scrapes everything off... some times you need a little patience but most times, a quick rinse, scrub with the brush, another thorough rinse, and dry with a paper towel... done. 

Cast iron won't warp easily, but I've warped thinner steel pans going from hot to hot water too fast. I don't do it anymore. Someone told me wash the bottom first to avoid a warp, even that doesnt work.



________________

Moving on:



Need a replacement food processor, currently have one of these, its about 15 years old:

http://www.cuisinart.com/discontinued/food_processors/dlc-5.html





Having trouble finding reliable info on a replacement, was thinking of trolling ebay until a used one of these came up since its servicable. I have no complaints about this model, its simple efficient and effective. But, wondering what else is out there worth owning? I use it at most once a week.

Anyone?
Edited by idfnl - 1/28/13 at 9:10pm
post #230 of 290
Ninja.
post #231 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Speaking of kitchen tools: next time you go to Paris, don't go to Charvet, go to Dehillerin. They (the men in blue dustcoats with pencils behind their ears) sell pots the size of bathtubs and spoons the size of paddles. And small stuff too. smile.gif Old-school old-school.

fbWs8.jpg

We have some great pics from when we visited there about 6 years ago which I will try to dig up. I could've spent all day in the store.
post #232 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post

We have some great pics from when we visited there about 6 years ago which I will try to dig up. I could've spent all day in the store.

Yes, please. Would be nice to see the pics.
I know what you mean, although there's not much air to breathe. : )
post #233 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


Need a replacement food processor, currently have one of these, its about 15 years old:

http://www.cuisinart.com/discontinued/food_processors/dlc-5.html
there are other food processors that are just about as good, but cuisinart is still the gold standard. why do you need to replace it? mine's like 35 years old and still runs like a top. it's such a brutally simple machine. i've replaced workbooks, feedtubes and blades a couple of times, but that's it.
post #234 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

there are other food processors that are just about as good, but cuisinart is still the gold standard. why do you need to replace it? mine's like 35 years old and still runs like a top. it's such a brutally simple machine. i've replaced workbooks, feedtubes and blades a couple of times, but that's it.

My understanding, more from their corporate history than from experience, is that the processors put out for a ten or fifteen year period pretty much sucked. Motors burned out, lots of leaking. Yours was made by Robot Coupe, and will last forever.
post #235 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

My understanding, more from their corporate history than from experience, is that the processors put out for a ten or fifteen year period pretty much sucked. Motors burned out, lots of leaking. Yours was made by Robot Coupe, and will last forever.
that's interesting. i hadn't heard that. there was an interesting business case study done several years on cuisinart that claimed their biggest problem was that the machines worked so well and so reliably. Everybody bought one. just one. that's what inspired the rush into other categories. but the brand has gone through several hands, so maybe you're right. i know i bought one of those minis a couple of years ago because amazon was basically giving them away and it was pretty worthless.
post #236 of 290
Thread Starter 
I don't use my food processor for much. It's good for making breadcrumbs, also fish/chicken mousses. Otherwise, I use my Bamix or Vitamix.
post #237 of 290
Had to return my Moulinette because of a manufacturing error. i haven't replaced it yet although it would have been nice to have once a couple times so far (for the veggie burgers in Jerusalem, for persillade, etc.), but I often work around it by cutting the thing very finely. I also have my ESGE Zauberstab, which can partially replace it.
post #238 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post


i smell a column coming on. i think steady and even are very closely related. the heat is retained and radiated (theoretically, anyway) across an even surface, rather than a quick heat/cool you get with a good conductor such as copper. can anyone give me a good explanation of this so i don't actually ahve to do my job?

I disagree that steady and even are related, at least as the words have been used here. What is at issue, scientifically, I think, is thermal conductivity.

Cast iron does not conduct heat well, at least, not as well as aluminum or copper or steel. This means it is less likely to transfer heat, either in or out, even to its neighboring cast iron molecules. When a section of cast iron pan is right over the burner, it is more apt to absorb the heat and keep it for itself than it is to pass that heat to its neighbors, or give it up to the surrounding air... or food. Hence its uneven heating on the stovetop.

But this same unwillingness to give up its heat easily is an advantage in the dutch oven situation, where its low thermal conductivity makes it less likely to cool down with the heat cycles of the oven, and it acts as a buffer of sorts to the surrounding oven temperatures - leading to a steadier temperature within the dutch oven. Its comparatively high mass probably also aids in this heat retention and buffering.

In this way, it's almost like an insulator, or a jacket, keeping the inside warm even as the outside air might fluctuate. It does not easily conduct heat out of the dutch oven when the outside air is cooler, nor does it easily allow heat in to the DO when the outside air is a bit warmer.

+1

Here's a good explanation I pulled up:
Quote:
Cast iron is about thermal inertia and searing
Or heat capacity.

Copper, like aluminum, and plated/nonstick versions of the two, is excellent for producing even heat. Both have high thermal conductivity that means the edge of the pan is close to the temperature of the bottom. Either would be great for evenly heating liquid or somewhat liquid foods.

I seem to recall that pots with copper cooking surfaces sometimes produce off tasting food with acids (like tomatoes) are present. The same is true of exposed and non-anodized aluminum.

But if you need to sear both sides of a piece of meat (inside), there is no substitute for an iron skillet, heated to a metal temperature in the 400s Fahreinheit. Any other material would relinquish its high searing temperatures on the first side of the steak, maybe only partially into sealing the surface. An iron skillet retains so much heat that it overwhelms solid foods hitting it, allowing browning and sealing of flavors.

I've only used mine a couple of times, but the second handle on the Allclad/Emirilware pan I have is a godsend when tossing the pan in the oven. Otherwise, there's not much to choose from in cast-iron. Its a 3000 year old technology.
post #239 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post


i smell a column coming on. i think steady and even are very closely related. the heat is retained and radiated (theoretically, anyway) across an even surface, rather than a quick heat/cool you get with a good conductor such as copper. can anyone give me a good explanation of this so i don't actually ahve to do my job?

 

They are related, but not closely, and the terms are fairly imprecise.

 

To me, even heating is a reasonably-explainable phenomena: A material with a high heat transfer coefficient will conduct heat within itself more rapidly, thus all points of such a material will respond faster to a change in temperature, all other things being equal. Across the surface of a pan, this will also be affected by the material thickness (a thin pan will have a less even heat distribution than a thick pan).

 

Steadiness, which sounds more like a pan's ability to maintain a constant* output of heat despite variations in the amount of heat going into the pan (Matt's oven cycling) is likely more related to heat capacity, which is the amount of energy it takes to heat up a unit of a material one degree -- you have to pump a lot more energy into certain materials to heat them up; thus, they have a greater store of energy to re-radiate out when the amount of energy flowing into them decreases.

 

They are related in that if you have a material with a really high heat capacity but also high conductivity, it may have a lot of stored energy but dump it fast. A material with a really high heat capacity and poor conductivitity will store a lot of energy and dump it slowly, and lastly, a material with a low heat capacity but high conductivity will store limited energy and dump it fast.

 

This will be confused by differing radiative heat transfer from different materials -- radiative heat transfer is not how you used it above, that's conduction (transfer by contact or within a substance), rather, radiative transfer is by energy radiating from a body (think of IR warming lamps -- they heat by IR radiation),

 

 

 

~ H

post #240 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

there are other food processors that are just about as good, but cuisinart is still the gold standard. why do you need to replace it? mine's like 35 years old and still runs like a top. it's such a brutally simple machine. i've replaced workbooks, feedtubes and blades a couple of times, but that's it.

Long story...

I was considering this model which seems to get great reviews:

http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DFP-14BCN-Processor-Brushed-Stainless/dp/B0000645TW



But, see below

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

that's interesting. i hadn't heard that. there was an interesting business case study done several years on cuisinart that claimed their biggest problem was that the machines worked so well and so reliably. Everybody bought one. just one. that's what inspired the rush into other categories. but the brand has gone through several hands, so maybe you're right. i know i bought one of those minis a couple of years ago because amazon was basically giving them away and it was pretty worthless.

In researching I learned this as well. The model I have now is one of the last good ones circa '97, they went thru a bad period but I don't know if their back.

I really hate it how everything is made by someone else now. You can never get consistent quality.

So, is cuisinart back?


Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Had to return my Moulinette because of a manufacturing error. i haven't replaced it yet although it would have been nice to have once a couple times so far (for the veggie burgers in Jerusalem, for persillade, etc.), but I often work around it by cutting the thing very finely. I also have my ESGE Zauberstab, which can partially replace it.

So how is the quality of the Moulinette?

I was also considering these:


http://www.appliancist.com/food_processors_blenders/bosch-hand-mixer-with-fine-creamer.html


http://www.waringcommercialproducts.com/catalog.php?pcID=88&products_id=369


http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-1112473/?affsrcid=Aff0001&mr:trackingCode=4D6929E3-1158-E211-8D02-001517384908&mr:referralID=NA&mr:adType=pla&mr:ad=29427145301&mr:keyword=&mr:match=&mr:filter=24156051701&origin=pla


http://www.centralrestaurant.com/Commercial-Food-Processor---2-1-2-Qt-Cutter-Bowl-Gray-c83p26897.html?cid=WSPLGOFPR455-057{adtype}&CAWELAID=1340999869&catargetid=1440171317&gclid=CICzx-fqjrUCFU-d4AodIUIA0w
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