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Kitchen Tools - Page 15

post #211 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Except since that article, everybody who tests it finds the same thing.
interesting. must have missed those. i haven't seen anything that replicated it. links? and just among us girls, i'll say that hal is terrific on theoretical science -- nobody better and he has revolutionized the way people think about cooking as much as anyone in my generation. but his practicum sometimes is lacking.
post #212 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

interesting. must have missed those. i haven't seen anything that replicated it. links? and just among us girls, i'll say that hal is terrific on theoretical science -- nobody better and he has revolutionized the way people think about cooking as much as anyone in my generation. but his practicum sometimes is lacking.

The people at FCI did a big expose with pictures and everything. Their website seems to have failed, though. The Serious Eats pictures come from them. Also, intuitively, French tops are cast iron and are effective because they aren't even. If the whole top was close to the same temp, they would be useless.

Admittedly, I have no use for cast iron skillets. I don't cook that way. I do love my Staub and Le Creuset dutch ovens but because the heat is so steady in them, not because it is so even. Then again, I apparently don't own any of them, so who knows.
post #213 of 290
I think we're moving into a phase where craftsmanship is more appreciated. I hear much more conversation about hand made japanese blades than ceramic 'modern gimmick' knives. Which used to be the first thing mentioned by the dinner party knife expert in my experiences.

I'm sure there is a point of diminishing returns when it comes to sharpening/Honing. I think the point at which the edge moves from 'honed' to 'polished' is probably rendering it less effective. If you look at a good razor's edge, you still see a ground appearance to it.
post #214 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I'm sure there is a point of diminishing returns when it comes to sharpening/Honing. I think the point at which the edge moves from 'honed' to 'polished' is probably rendering it less effective. If you look at a good razor's edge, you still see a ground appearance to it.
i seem to recall seeing some microscopic photos of knife edges (yes, this is what i do), that demonstrated the value of "microserrations" that are present when a knife hasn't been over-honed. that's what gives the blade "grip" when it's dragged across the surface of something.
post #215 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I do love my Staub and Le Creuset dutch ovens but because the heat is so steady in them, not because it is so even.
not trolling, but how do you describe the difference between "steady" heat and "even" heat? i am probably the same way -- i've got a couple cast-iron skillets but i rarely use them. on the other hand, my dutch ovens almost never leave the stove at this time of year.
post #216 of 290
dreaded double post.
post #217 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

i seem to recall seeing some microscopic photos of knife edges (yes, this is what i do), that demonstrated the value of "microserrations" that are present when a knife hasn't been over-honed. that's what gives the blade "grip" when it's dragged across the surface of something.

This is only intuitive, but my guess is that unless you are pushing a knife straight down, which isn't very good technique anyway, the microserrations do help. Either way, the second you steel a knife it is going to take off the polish, so unless you want to run back to a stone every time you need to straighten your knife, you aren't getting much out of anything over 3000 grit or so.
post #218 of 290
Steady heat = slow reaction to temperature changes.
Even heat = even distribution of heat.
post #219 of 290
So, by steady heat I mean that if I have a braise in the oven in a dutch oven, when the temperature cycles in the oven the temperature inside the dutch oven won't change much because cast iron is so slow to heat up and cool down. A copper casserole will cycle with the oven, and those cycles can be like 40 degrees or so. It is steady in that way. It is uneven in that the sides and middle are so different on a burner, even a big one. My main complaint, if I had to make one, about the skillets is that I sear meat, then turn the heat down to finish, and cast iron doesn't respond.
post #220 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Steady heat = slow reaction to temperature changes.
Even heat = even distribution of heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

So, by steady heat I mean that if I have a braise in the oven in a dutch oven, when the temperature cycles in the oven the temperature inside the dutch oven won't change much because cast iron is so slow to heat up and cool down. A copper casserole will cycle with the oven, and those cycles can be like 40 degrees or so. It is steady in that way. It is uneven in that the sides and middle are so different on a burner, even a big one. My main complaint, if I had to make one, about the skillets is that I sear meat, then turn the heat down to finish, and cast iron doesn't respond.

i smell a column coming on. i think steady and even are very closely related. the heat is retained and radiated (theoretically, anyway) across an even surface, rather than a quick heat/cool you get with a good conductor such as copper. can anyone give me a good explanation of this so i don't actually ahve to do my job?
post #221 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

My main complaint, if I had to make one, about the skillets is that I sear meat, then turn the heat down to finish, and cast iron doesn't respond.

might have been answered before but what do you use to cook meat?
post #222 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by tropics View Post

might have been answered before but what do you use to cook meat?

Depends on how I cook it. I rarely cook a steak or something like that, but if I do, I'll do it in a copper saute pan. I don't think I actually eat a lot of meat, come to think of it, and when I do, I roast it. I cook fish in a nonstick pan.
post #223 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post


Why do you let it cool? I wash mine while it's still hot under hot running water. Makes it easier and faster to clean.

 

The difference in temperature is not good for the pan, so i've read.  Going from 500 degrees to 130 under "hot" running water is not good for the pan to change in temperature that quickly.  Rather, I'll let it cool and clean it under warm water.  Its still easy to clean, I have a bristle brush that scrapes everything off... some times you need a little patience but most times, a quick rinse, scrub with the brush, another thorough rinse, and dry with a paper towel... done. 

post #224 of 290
Anecdotally, whenever I cook bacon or fry latkes (now there are two things you dont often see in the same sentence) in my cast iron, I always have to move things around a lot because the very middle of the pan is hot and the edges are not.

I love my cast iron, but it is definitely more for sentimental reasons than anything. I stand by my statement though that it is about the best cheap cookware you can get. I'd take a $20 cast iron pan over a $20 wal-mart pan any day.
post #225 of 290
I cook steak on the regular occasion, either tenderloin or a thick strip steak. I use an enamelled cast iron pan, preheat in the oven then sear on all sides. I've always pre heated in the oven, rather than wait for the burner to bring it to temp. This explains why the few times I have skipped that step, the results were poor.
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