or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Kitchen Tools
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Kitchen Tools - Page 14

post #196 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

@NOBD: When metal heats up, it expands. If you shock it with cold water, it will contract and can warp, reducing the effective surface area that's in contact with the heating element which can lead to uneven heating. Depending on the material, there's also some tension and the temperature shock might -- over time -- break the material. I'm very sure the former applies to your question, however not completely sure whether the second idea does (and whether it's correct).

I understand, but what if you don't shock it with cold water? I clean my pans directly from the stove with running hot water. Of course, the water isn't as hot as the pan, but I think it prevents the downsides you describe; at least, I haven't experienced any of those.
post #197 of 290
A hot pan is like 300-400°F whereas hot water is about 185°F. So yeah, it shouldn't be as bad as cold water but nonetheless it still shocks the pan to some extent. To be on the safe side, I suppose it's still better to wait.
post #198 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

A hot pan is like 300-400°F whereas hot water is about 185°F. So yeah, it shouldn't be as bad as cold water but nonetheless it still shocks the pan to some extent. To be on the safe side, I suppose it's still better to wait.

I understand. But too much trouble... smile.gif
post #199 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

You know everything and everyone and have all the best facts. But you have no experience with cast iron which makes you look like a blowhard and it seems like that bothers you. You can own a sports car and try and start from a stop in 6th gear and then complain the car accelerates like shit. This is basically what you're doing here.

If you know how to use the tool you avoid the problem mentioned. Very simple. I didn't even know why I heated it slowly, and I admitted it here. I'm not trying to hide anything.

Look, I only took exception to your uneven heat complaint, the rest I'm more or less in agreement about. And here I am trying to give members advice on how to avoid it: heat the pan slowly.

This hasn't gone well for you. Accept that I have more experience here, learn something like I did, show more respect to other members and move on.

We'll try again next time.

What makes you think I've never used cast iron, idfnl? And why don't you believe Harold McGee when he tells you that heating the cast iron slowly does not, in fact, make it heat more evenly? He was able to admit that he was wrong, despite what he had long believed true, why can't you be a man and do the same thing?
post #200 of 290
Oh, brother . . .
post #201 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

yEFdp.jpg

(The small one is newer.)

These look great.

I've been thinking about making some of these next up on my cookware list...
post #202 of 290
So, I bought an EdgePro.

I did not buy a ceramic hone, as I have a decent steel already. Mistake?

My rationale: I only got the 200 and 400 stones for now, as anything would be better than what I'm dealing with now, and I'm early in the learning curve. Perhaps if I find myself clamoring for more sharp, I'll get more stones, a fixer, and maybe a ceramic if they're recommended for those super polished edges.
post #203 of 290
Quote:
yup.
but i will say that i've been doing a lot more hand-sharpening lately ... just something i want to learn to do ... and i th ink maybe the key is not worrying about it so much. i used to really sweat getting the right angle ... was talking to the guy at korin and he just laughed. he does it by rotating the blade against the stone until he feels them match up. duh. yeah. it works great (not for double bevels ... and mildly problematic for chisel edges).
post #204 of 290
jesus, what is with all the drama lately? the even heating of cast-iron has long been widely accepted, even if it might be wrong. hal's story was provocative, but one story is hardly the final word (unless it's, well, you know, mine).
post #205 of 290
I always wondered what Hal was short for.
post #206 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

but i will say that i've been doing a lot more hand-sharpening lately ... just something i want to learn to do ... and i think maybe the key is not worrying about it so much.

+1. There were two things that really helped me get to the next level with this. First, doing the Dave Martell trick of running a Sharpie along the edge of the blade road before you start. It will wear off in a few passes on the stone, but once you've made your initial pass through the whole blade you can easily see areas you were missing or need to spend more time on. Second, I had no problem locking my wrists at the correct angle but I didn't realize I wasn't lifting the knife straight off the stone, but rather sort of rolling it whenever I lifted it up, which in turn was slightly dulling the blade.
post #207 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

+1. There were two things that really helped me get to the next level with this. First, doing the Dave Martell trick of running a Sharpie along the edge of the blade road before you start. It will wear off in a few passes on the stone, but once you've made your initial pass through the whole blade you can easily see areas you were missing or need to spend more time on. Second, I had no problem locking my wrists at the correct angle but I didn't realize I wasn't lifting the knife straight off the stone, but rather sort of rolling it whenever I lifted it up, which in turn was slightly dulling the blade.
thanks! that sharpie trick was also recommended in the instructions for the edgepro. really works (and one of those things that's completely logical, but you'd never really think about it unless somebody pointed it out).
post #208 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

jesus, what is with all the drama lately? the even heating of cast-iron has long been widely accepted, even if it might be wrong. hal's story was provocative, but one story is hardly the final word (unless it's, well, you know, mine).

Except since that article, everybody who tests it finds the same thing.
post #209 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

yup.
but i will say that i've been doing a lot more hand-sharpening lately ... just something i want to learn to do ... and i th ink maybe the key is not worrying about it so much. i used to really sweat getting the right angle ... was talking to the guy at korin and he just laughed. he does it by rotating the blade against the stone until he feels them match up. duh. yeah. it works great (not for double bevels ... and mildly problematic for chisel edges).
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

yup.
but i will say that i've been doing a lot more hand-sharpening lately ... just something i want to learn to do ... and i th ink maybe the key is not worrying about it so much. i used to really sweat getting the right angle ... was talking to the guy at korin and he just laughed. he does it by rotating the blade against the stone until he feels them match up. duh. yeah. it works great (not for double bevels ... and mildly problematic for chisel edges).

Yes, that is the intuitive method.
post #210 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post


Yes, that is the intuitive method.

That is how I was taught.

Just a few thoughts on sharpening. First, people often go too fine with their stones and start to judge their knives on how they cut newsprint, tomato skin or arm hair. They put a screaming sharp but not particularly functional edge on their knives. Second, it is a pain in the ass to hone knives on a stone or strop all the time, so the edge you put on should be there with an eye to how it will maintain under use and with rod (or steel) touch ups.

I'm really glad people are starting to learn to sharpen their knives. It's much better than when people were just spending a lot of money on esoteric ones. That said, it clearly has not translated to many people I know. Their knives are generally the dull.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Kitchen Tools