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Kitchen Tools - Page 13

post #181 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

It really doesn't matter what it is known for, what matters is what is true, and the truth is that heat distribution is awful...

Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Cast iron is indeed very uneven... But I love it anyways. Admittedly purely for sentimental reasons, but I love it nonetheless. I use mine mostly to roast chickens and fry bacon, so the unevenness isn't as big of a deal.

I will say that cast iron is better than just about any other cheap cookware--I'd take cast iron over some paper thin shitty frying pan any day of the week.

If you are using an undersized burner or are heating it too fast, then it forms hot spots. Most pans will. I think that article is misleading. I was taught to heat a cast iron pan slowly and if you do that the issue is nullified.

My personal experience is that a cast iron skillet is so good at corn bread because of its distribution properties. I always saw the cornbread come out perfectly colored.


http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/07/dining/07mini.html
Quote:
Furthermore, it is an even distributor of heat, which you will instantly appreciate if switching from stainless steel or aluminum. And you can move it from stove top to oven without a thought.

Edited by idfnl - 1/15/13 at 9:34pm
post #182 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


If you are using an undersized burner or are heating it too fast, then it forms hot spots. Most pans will. I think that article is misleading. I was taught to heat a cast iron pan slowly and if you do that the issue is nullified.

My personal experience is that a cast iron skillet is so good at corn bread because if its distribution properties. I always saw the cornbread come out perfectly colored.


http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/07/dining/07mini.html

OK, this is why people treat you like an asshole. You don't know anything, have no information, and yet you continue to argue on your lack of knowledge. I don't care, use your pans. I've been using the same pans since I was 23, with a few additions along the way. They suit me well.

Anyway, here is somebody from the NY Times who, unlike Mark Bittman, knows what he is talking about:
Quote:
The heavy copper and the light aluminum pans produced evenly toasted heat maps. The stainless-clad aluminum did pretty well, too. But the cast-iron pan scorched a small area, and the pattern was familiar. For years I made risotto every week or two in my favorite enameled cast-iron pot, and always found a solid brown ring of stuck rice grains right above the flame.

Still, I was surprised, because I’d always heard and thought that cast iron was a slow but even conductor. I wondered if it would perform better if I heated it more gradually over a low flame, or on an electric heating coil, which would contact more of the pan bottom than the gas flame. I was wrong. The low flame caused even browning over a small area at the center of the pan, and none elsewhere. The electric burner gave a pattern much like the flame’s.

When I spot-checked the cast iron with my thermometer, there was a consistent 100-degree difference between the pan center and an inch from the edge. That’s easily enough to make the difference between browning and scorching. My cast-iron pan makes a much better potato galette in even oven heat.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/08/dining/08curi.html?pagewanted=1&ref=dining
Edited by itsstillmatt - 1/15/13 at 9:31pm
post #183 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

You don't know anything, have no information, and yet you continue to argue on your lack of knowledge. I don't care, use your pans. I've been using the same pans since I was 23, with a few additions along the way. They suit me well.

I know that cast iron pans are meant to be heated slowly. I never knew why, I was just taught this way, so this exchange was enlightening. You don't seem to handle someone with a different viewpoint very well.

Cast iron is great for many uses, I think you've been shown that here and are having trouble handling it. You should consider that maybe you can learn something too instead of always needing to be the authority in the room.

I also get the feeling you don't even own a cast iron skillet, while I own 2. A cast iron frying pan, a cast iron baking dish and a cast iron grill pan. So I wonder who is in a better position to comment from experience?
post #184 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

I know that cast iron pans are meant to be heated slowly. I never knew why, I was just taught this way, so this exchange was enlightening. You don't seem to handle someone with a different viewpoint very well.

Cast iron is great for many uses, I think you've been shown that here and are having trouble handling it. You should consider that maybe you can learn something here instead of always needing to be the authority in the room.

I also get the feeling you don't even own a cast iron skillet, while I own 2. A cast iron frying pan, a cast iron baking dish and a cast iron grill pan. So I wonder who is in a better position to comment from experience?

Are you really this fucking stupid?
post #185 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Are you really this fucking stupid?

I guess so, only because I thought it was possible to have a normal discussion with someone like you.
post #186 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

I guess so. I had a feeling trying to have a normal discussion with someone like you was always going to end badly.

Most people don't believe that having a "normal" discussion entails dismissing hard evidence presented in favor of anecdotes, cornbread and Mark Bittman lauding his newest bestest idea. That is what you think normal is, which is why conversations don't go well for you.
post #187 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Most people don't believe that having a "normal" discussion entail dismissing hard evidence presented in favor of anecdotes, cornbread and Mark Bittman lauding his newest bestest idea. That is what you think normal is, which is why conversations don't go well for you.

You know everything and everyone and have all the best facts. But you have no experience with cast iron which makes you look like a blowhard and it seems like that bothers you. You can own a sports car and try and start from a stop in 6th gear and then complain the car accelerates like shit. This is basically what you're doing here.

If you know how to use the tool you avoid the problem mentioned. Very simple. I didn't even know why I heated it slowly, and I admitted it here. I'm not trying to hide anything.

Look, I only took exception to your uneven heat complaint, the rest I'm more or less in agreement about. And here I am trying to give members advice on how to avoid it: heat the pan slowly.

This hasn't gone well for you. Accept that I have more experience here, learn something like I did, show more respect to other members and move on.

We'll try again next time.
post #188 of 290
Coincidentally, I recently was gifted a cast iron pan. Heated a bunch of roots slowly in the oven last week as my first time cooking with the thing. Most uneven roast I've ever served.
post #189 of 290
Yeah, but do you own 2 cast iron skillets, a cast iron frying pan, a cast iron baking dish AND a cast iron grill pan? I thought not- you know nothing.
post #190 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Coincidentally, I recently was gifted a cast iron pan. Heated a bunch of roots slowly in the oven last week as my first time cooking with the thing. Most uneven roast I've ever served.

The problem with heat spots and cast iron comes from burners. An oven doesn't present a direct heat source. I've used my cast iron baking pan dozens of times to roast potatoes, carrots, and a number of other items without a hitch, in fact I prefer it. My cast iron skillet produces perfect corn bread every time. I'm the lucky outlier I guess.

My experience with cast iron is that its useful in some situations. I'll leave it there.
Edited by idfnl - 1/15/13 at 10:39pm
post #191 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbel View Post

Yeah, but do you own 2 cast iron skillets, a cast iron frying pan, a cast iron baking dish AND a cast iron grill pan? I thought not- you know nothing.

I think I was accused of knowing nothing. You should put your reading glasses on.
post #192 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjr4884 View Post

After ever use, let the pan cool, put it under warm water, i have a bristle brush, scrub lightly until surface is clean... wipe dry.  Done.  Every once in a while i'll put a coat of veggie oil on the inside of the pan. 

Why do you let it cool? I wash mine while it's still hot under hot running water. Makes it easier and faster to clean.
post #193 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Mine are almost black now and have a nice non-stick layer.

yEFdp.jpg

(The small one is newer.)
post #194 of 290
I saw lots of new posts and thought the discussion lead to something productive. I was wrong. facepalm.gif

Has the FCI cooking blog always been restricted?

@NOBD: When metal heats up, it expands. If you shock it with cold water, it will contract and can warp, reducing the effective surface area that's in contact with the heating element which can lead to uneven heating. Depending on the material, there's also some tension and the temperature shock might -- over time -- break the material. I'm very sure the former applies to your question, however not completely sure whether the second idea does (and whether it's correct).
Edited by b1os - 1/16/13 at 3:28am
post #195 of 290
anybody want some perfect corn bread?

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