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Kitchen Tools - Page 11

post #151 of 290
One wet stone is usually not enough, you need a few different grits. The rougher ones to completely restore and edge then the lighter ones to progressively hone it out. I have a set of them from about 400 grit diamond stones all the way up to 10,000 grit japanese wet stones.

I sharpen by hand at the moment, but my brother bought one of those fixtures that holds the blade at a specific angle and they really do create a consistently better edge than doing it by hand. By Hand, even with good experience you'll end up creating a convex edge, which is going to be duller than a flat edge.
post #152 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I sharpen by hand at the moment, but my brother bought one of those fixtures that holds the blade at a specific angle and they really do create a consistently better edge than doing it by hand. By Hand, even with good experience you'll end up creating a convex edge, which is going to be duller than a flat edge.

Link?
post #153 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl 


I'm a train wreck with non-stick. I'm not sure what I am doing wrong.

Anyway, I prefer a cast iron frying pan. I have one of these:

http://www.polyvore.com/iittala_tools_cast_iron_fry/thing?id=9579641

Awful pic, I don't think its made any more.

I have this nice Woll non-stick and have wrecked it. Has anyone solved how not to destroy one of these? I've gone thru like 4.

 

Few things I always "stick" to with non-stick.  Chemicals and heat aren't good.  If you plan on searing, braising, etc... dont' use non-stick.  Anything more than medium heat (respectively) is my threshhold point.  Also, I always wash with warm water and a little bit of soap.  Lastly, rubber/plastic/wood only, no metal utensils on non-stick.  I've had some for a couple years and they are in great condition.  No dish washer either!  Careful on how you store them as well... if you store pots and pans on top of each other, make sure the lid is on upside down and nothing it making contact with the inside of the pan

post #154 of 290
post #155 of 290
thnx
post #156 of 290
I have an Edge Pro as well. I am a good freehand sharpener, and this thing is so much better than I am. It's just so consistent. I can't, by hand, switch between 12 and 15 degrees, but it can, and it is simple to do and fast. I was skeptical because I never had a dull knife problem, but I really do love it. I don't have the upgrade model, just the standard, but I do have upgraded stones from chefknivestogo.com.
post #157 of 290
Oh, I use metal utensils in nonstick and crank up the heat when necessary. Never had a problem with longevity and not dead yet. I wouldn't braise in them because that would be kind of weird.
post #158 of 290
Do you use the Pro model or the Apex one?

Or should I say, for a mere mortal for whom money is an object, is there a compelling reason to go Pro vs. Apex?
post #159 of 290
I use the Apex. I think there is a reason to upgrade the stones because I find that the regular stones just go too slowly.
post #160 of 290
thanks, seems affordable enough at that level, and perhaps fairly idiot proof.

[piob]as we know, I am not a smart man[/piob]
post #161 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

You could try these and make them non-stick yourself by burning them in and using them:


What is burning them in mean? Is that some kind of process like you'd do with a cast iron skillet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jjr4884 View Post

Few things I always "stick" to with non-stick.  Chemicals and heat aren't good.  If you plan on searing, braising, etc... dont' use non-stick.  Anything more than medium heat (respectively) is my threshhold point.  Also, I always wash with warm water and a little bit of soap.  Lastly, rubber/plastic/wood only, no metal utensils on non-stick.  I've had some for a couple years and they are in great condition.  No dish washer either!  Careful on how you store them as well... if you store pots and pans on top of each other, make sure the lid is on upside down and nothing it making contact with the inside of the pan

Ya, I screw up here. Sometimes I don't want to wash a pan and shrug shoulders and crank up the heat on the non-stick.

Storage is a great point. Scratches on non-stick are like cracks in windshields.
post #162 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

What is burning them in mean? Is that some kind of process like you'd do with a cast iron skillet?

Sorry, might have translated that too literally. I meant seasoning:



At 1 min. 31 sec.

Mine are almost black now and have a nice non-stick layer. Wash them with hot water (no soap), dry them and oil them, to prevent rust. Heavy, old-school pans.
post #163 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Sorry, might have translated that too literally. I meant seasoning:



At 1 min. 31 sec.

Mine are almost black now and have a nice non-stick layer. Wash them with hot water (no soap), dry them and oil them, to prevent rust. Heavy, old-school pans.

Ok, I get it. Those are like the frying pans they use in restaurants.

Interesting option. I like to buy lifetime kitchen stuff.
post #164 of 290
Some of mine are older than ten years. And they feel and look as solid as when I bought them.
post #165 of 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Some of mine are older than ten years. And they feel and look as solid as when I bought them.

I'm going to get one and try it. They look priced between $30 and $75 for 7 up to 14" over here.
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