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Yohji, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Looser Fit (Yohji Yamamoto Thread) - Page 213

post #3181 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivwri View Post

Man, I am probably going to spend way too much on SS13. Those pants in the first look you posted must be in my wardrobe! Actually the whole look to be honest. Really liked the way the entire outfit looked in motion. Also looking at a pair of the printed pants and the blazers with the tails. Beautiful.

Was that shuit who posts regularly on SZ in the background wearing a hat? Or is he featured on People Wearing Yohji Yamamoto instead, or the 2 are the same person?
post #3182 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidlee388 View Post


Hey, you have one of the most interesting pieces from AW05 ( my personal favourite PH ), yes it is indeed Look 42. Asobu, Wire and I were discussing this piece last year when it appeared on Y! in sz 2 and they both advised me to go for it. I was outbidded 10 mins before the auction ended to which I couldn't respond using a Proxy. It sold for ~ 38k yen, I was gutted. The construction is indeed crazy good, so unusual in style as well, fun, practical and unique. It's a very rare piece; I did see this on eBay some months later ( a Gernan seller ) in sz 4 but I considered it too big for me ( I ain't a fold sleeves fan, but it's just me lol ) so I passed. You and I have the same height but if you think it works, it works! Sometimes the perfect fit in the Yohji Universe is the imperfect fit.
Finally to get this piece at that price is just ridiculously ridiculous. #envy

You might want to try FromJapan... As much as I love Hide-San and SSJ, FJ is just so much more convenient and easier to use......You can specify the shipping method/declared value you want to use, track your items online and most important of all, avoid losing auction at the last minute.....I've used their service several times now and my items(clothing, vinyl records) all arrive safe and sound without hitting customs. 

post #3183 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benesyed View Post

I just wanted to throw this out there but does anyone else feel bad about the price of all this clothing. It bothers me to spend so much on clothing when I could use the money to help people. I think esp for Y it bothers me a lot more because I dont consider him to be one of those fashion obsessed trendy designers like hedi or formachetti. When i saw that interview about how beautiful things are disappearing and how there is an antagonism between authority and rebellion and doing what is right and solving problems, it felt to me as if 1k for a jacket is not helping. I believe with my heart that beautiful things are disappearing, but part of that beauty is kindness and self-lessness and sometimes this fashion, even with all its positive aspects (copared to the rest), is another temptation?
TBH, id like to learn how to make clothing myself one day and make things at cost so that my cash can be invested in different social programs like those that help ppl find jobs. But i also want to support Y because of his vision and love of his craft.
Idk if im explaining myself well/\. shog[1].gif

It's a very noble way of thinking Ben. However this Wealth vs Indulgence topic is rather relative in my view. Whilst we think spending $2000 on a Yohji blazer sometimes is utter extravagance, others may think that's small change compared to buying a Patek Philippe for $30000. Then the Patek person is nothing compared to someone spending $1 million per metre on a Superyacht etc. My point is there are always people better and worse off than yourself. For me as long as I'm not inflicting harm to the world in general, I'm doing good to it already.
post #3184 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

agreed. also i don't think silent is good quality at all, so unless it really fits into the aesthetic better off keeping the cash

I agree with this for the most part. Almost all Silent pieces I've handled have left me disappointed, especially the polios pants. The quality definitely doesn't warrant the price. The silhouettes that they use are fine but they need a better fabric than the cotton they use on all their pieces. It's crap for what you pay. That said, I think the made in Italy stuff is actually of good quality. I have one piece, a parka, that is quite nice. Also, this jacket that BBSLM is selling looks like the fabric is better than normal Silent stuff. The only piece of Silent I still own other than that parka is a pair of shorts that I need since it gets so hot here. They're fine but certainly not worth whatever they retailed for.
post #3185 of 5741

I get the feeling I'm interupting some existential crisis but back to my coat, should I get a tailor to deal with the arm length? I doubt it can be taken in from the shoulder so I guess the only option would be to just chop off the cuff. Also, I'm just wearing an undershirt and jeans in the photos I took but what should I wear with this? I doubt I will find hakama pants in the the thrift store (mabye in the womens section but I'm to selfconscious to sift through it) but I used to wear some Gap linen beach pants that were very loose and blousy (but I've never seen them in black). I also have some vintage DAKS flared wool trousers that I bought because I the construction was fantastic but I never wear them because they are a bit... 70's. Do you thing washing them in warm water would remove the pressed crease and make it flow a bit better?

 

Also, I typically wear jackets between size 48-50 but this coat is only a smidge large at the shoulders (about the size that my overcoats are). I know Yohji does make some of his pieces with a dropped/oversized shoulder but is there any method to which pieces are meant to be worn oversized vs true? I get the feeling that if I were to wear a size 2, the shoulder would be too small for me which wouldn't make sense with the Yohji fit but since I am the same size as you and you said before that the sizing should go by height, do I think a size 2 would fit better on me than this?

 

Thanks everyone for the help and by the way, I live in Vancouver but don't expect to thrift any good pieces because I have them allbiggrin.gif (at least all of them that are in my size). 

post #3186 of 5741
Existential stuff:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I do agree that its about improving yourself not the particular manifestation of selfishness. You can probably give lots of money away and not really open your heart to your fellow man. Im not a religious person but my mother told me that there is a story about how one of the prophets was collecting offerings or a token for God and many people gave nice things, when he came upon a beggar the beggar offered his only coat and was ashamed that he could not give more. The prophet told him that his donation would be among the highest recieved by the lord, since it wasn't as if good needed any of these things, it mattered more the intent and will. To that extent if you give money only because it is convenient and purely to avoid being involved then you still ave the wrong attitude. Also, iwri, you probably do much more good than I do in the long run making medicines and devices. so kudos smile.gif

To HU, I think some black pants will work nice. I think something roomy at the thighs with a slight taper to the ankles would look nice. Or even a straight fit would be nice. The coat really speaks volumes, I think something that lets the coat do its thing would be good.
Edited by Benesyed - 11/4/12 at 7:21pm
post #3187 of 5741
1983 article on Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo

Quote:
"Fashion : Loose Translator"

By Bernadine Morris
Published Jan 30, 1983 in the New York Times


To Western eyes, the clothes have a bold, new look that is not easily assimilated. Some call it ''ragged chic'' or the ''bag lady look.'' ''They are for the woman who is independent, who is not swayed by what her husband thinks,'' Miss Kawakubo says. While she feels that her clothes represent a dramatic change from conventional forms of dress, she also believes that women are ready for such a change. Perhaps not every woman and perhaps not yet, but retailers who have stocked the clothes on a small scale in the past few seasons believe they have great potential.

''They don't condescend to intelligent women,'' says Barbara Weiser, who, with her mother, Selma, runs the five Charivari shops on Manhattan's West Side. ''The clothes are interesting as design.''

In February, Bendel's will open a new shop devoted to Miss Kawakubo's collection, which is called Comme des Gar,cons. Why the French name? ''The clothes are not particularly feminine,'' Miss Kawakubo explains. ''They tend to be in dark colors, like men's clothes.'' Even more importantly, she says, she liked the sound of the French phrase.

"We must break away from conventional forms of dress for the new woman of today. We need a new strong image, not a revisit to the past. I have been trying for three years. This time, I think I have been most successful.''

Rei Kawakubo, a small woman wrapped in black, is sitting in her new, as yet unfurnished, workroom in Tokyo. She speaks through an interpreter, her associate Stella Ishii, but her words seem as powerful as her designs. She is the most articulate of the new breed of Japanese designers.

The designers have, in a decade or two, passed from the kimono through the history of Western fashion. As has Issey Miyake, Japan's most widely known designer, they have won a following and no little success on their native ground, where the women are infatuated with fashion. Now they are preparing to conquer the world.

They are not beginners. Miss Kawakubo, who has just turned 40, has been designing clothes for her own company and others for 15 years. Yohji Yamamoto, 38, has been in business for 10 years.

They are working out their own ground rules, geared to contemporary living and not bound by dressmaking traditions. Their approach has little to do with the Western conceit of making clothes that alternately conceal and reveal the body. Showing off the figure is not the point of their designs, all of which tend to fit loosely.

This is essential since, for home consumption, at least, the clothes are made in one size to fit everybody (at least from size 4 to size 16, and possibly larger). Some concessions are made for the West. For export, Mr. Yamamoto produces two sizes for bottoms - small and medium - though for tops and dresses there is still only one size, as in Japan. The advantages for the storekeeper, as well as the customer, are obvious: There is little chance of a customer's selecting a particular style only to then discover that it is out of stock in the proper size.

The long-range possibilities are staggering. Since most of the Japanese styles can be packed flatly, elaborate closet facilities could become unnecessary. And perhaps some day, a person will have to carry only a toothbrush and some books when visiting a friend for the weekend; the friend will have a supply of easily stored clothes for borrowing.

That is for the future. Right now, the big advantage of Japanese styles lies in their total comfort and absence of restrictions on body movement. They also tend to be made of natural fabrics -mostly cottons and silks - many of which have been treated so they do not require ironing. Skirt lengths are irrelevant and trousers tend to be easy.

To Western eyes, the clothes have a bold, new look that is not easily assimilated. Some call it ''ragged chic'' or the ''bag lady look.'' ''They are for the woman who is independent, who is not swayed by what her husband thinks,'' Miss Kawakubo says. While she feels that her clothes represent a dramatic change from conventional forms of dress, she also believes that women are ready for such a change. Perhaps not every woman and perhaps not yet, but retailers who have stocked the clothes on a small scale in the past few seasons believe they have great potential.

''Three years ago, when I first went to Japan, I had no idea of the magnitude of their fashion image,'' says Gene Pressman of Barneys New York, who visited Tokyo recently to see the designers on their home ground. ''It's a wild, avant-garde look. I expected just to find knockoffs. Some of it must be toned down, but it certainly will have an influence on American clothes.''

''They don't condescend to intelligent women,'' says Barbara Weiser, who, with her mother, Selma, runs the five Charivari shops on Manhattan's West Side. ''The clothes are interesting as design.''

A lot of women understand the message, Miss Weiser has found. ''As soon as we get the Yamamoto clothes into the store, they sell out,'' she says.

Geraldine Stutz, the president of Henri Bendel, calls the newest Japanese designs ''exciting and somewhat exotic to Western eyes,'' but predicts that they will soon become familiar.

''Fads happen every five minutes in fashion, but a change of real strength and real importance is rare,'' she says. ''The Japanese are offering us this kind of change. They are certainly opening our eyes to a new way of looking at clothes.''

In February, Bendel's will open a new shop devoted to Miss Kawakubo's collection, which is called Comme des Gar,cons. Why the French name? ''The clothes are not particularly feminine,'' Miss Kawakubo explains. ''They tend to be in dark colors, like men's clothes.'' Even more importantly, she says, she liked the sound of the French phrase.

Esthetic considerations are significant in the Japanese collections, taking the form of a hidden pocket in an unexpected place in the clothes of Yohji Yamamoto or cutouts that are employed for textural effects in Miss Kawakubo's clothes.

These are a natural extension of the Japanese sense of artistry apparent in their flower arrangements, their prints, their presentation of food.

Coupled with the traditional attention to detail - some call it professionalism - and mastery of technology, it contributes to the impact of Japanese fashions.

For about 20 years, the Japanese have imported some Western fashions and contracted with other noted designers to reproduce their clothes. They have come to Paris and New York, assimilated how clothes were made and sold and how women looked.

''When I first visited Japan 20 years ago, the women were still in kimonos,'' says Marc Bohan, the designer for Christian Dior, which was among the first fashion houses to license the manufacture of their clothes in Japan. Today the Japanese business is second only to that done in the United States, according to Mr. Bohan.

''Now all the women there are interested in fashion,'' says Mr. Bohan. ''It is a tremendous stimulation to a designer, and the designers are responding to it.''

Calvin Klein, whose licensing arrangement with Japan goes back seven years, is impressed with the technology. ''If they don't have a fabric we use, they can reproduce it quickly and efficiently,'' he says. ''They have a fantastic ability to understand and to follow through.''

Given the Japanese facility for designing and manufacturing clothes, some Western observers fear eventual competition in fashion that will be as formidable as that which already exists in the automotive and electronics fields. Others admire the designers as blazers of new fashion trails that are indisputably modern. Whatever the attitude, the feeling is widespread that the Japanese fashion tide is coming and that, if nothing else, it will stimulate thinking about the kind of clothes we wear.
post #3188 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarukiUeda View Post

but back to my coat, should I get a tailor to deal with the arm length? 

if you plan on keeping the coat, you could have the sleeves shortened. you said there are surgeon cuffs.. that's working button holes, yeah? If so, it will be kind of pricey shortening the sleeves since the tailor would have to do it from the shoulder to keep the buttonholes in tact. otherwise, you could just hack them off wherever you think the length works best (first thumb knuckle?), but the buttons might fall in the wrong place. if you think you'll sell it off someday, you might want to leave it in it's original form. you can also just roll the sleeves for awhile until you decide.

welcome by the way.
post #3189 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benesyed View Post

I just wanted to throw this out there but does anyone else feel bad about the price of all this clothing. It bothers me to spend so much on clothing when I could use the money to help people. I think esp for Y it bothers me a lot more because I dont consider him to be one of those fashion obsessed trendy designers like hedi or formachetti. When i saw that interview about how beautiful things are disappearing and how there is an antagonism between authority and rebellion and doing what is right and solving problems, it felt to me as if 1k for a jacket is not helping. I believe with my heart that beautiful things are disappearing, but part of that beauty is kindness and self-lessness and sometimes this fashion, even with all its positive aspects (copared to the rest), is another temptation?
TBH, id like to learn how to make clothing myself one day and make things at cost so that my cash can be invested in different social programs like those that help ppl find jobs. But i also want to support Y because of his vision and love of his craft.
Idk if im explaining myself well/\. shog[1].gif

I don't want to sound selfish and greedy. However, I think you shouldn't feel bad for rewarding yourself from your hard work. Whether its a yohji garment, a vacation or whatever. It's also good to help people, but you know sometimes you wonder if those people you've helped will remember your good deeds or even attend your funeral if you die. At least, you can wear a yohji suit and look stylish when your inside your coffin nod[1].gif

With yohji pieces sometimes I question if the prices are justified because many of them are made with synthetic materials. I don't question the craftsmanship and the creativity of the design, however not many people can wear yohji because of its impracticality and I wonder if the high prices compensate for that.
post #3190 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarukiUeda View Post

I get the feeling I'm interupting some existential crisis but back to my coat, should I get a tailor to deal with the arm length? I doubt it can be taken in from the shoulder so I guess the only option would be to just chop off the cuff. Also, I'm just wearing an undershirt and jeans in the photos I took but what should I wear with this? I doubt I will find hakama pants in the the thrift store (mabye in the womens section but I'm to selfconscious to sift through it) but I used to wear some Gap linen beach pants that were very loose and blousy (but I've never seen them in black). I also have some vintage DAKS flared wool trousers that I bought because I the construction was fantastic but I never wear them because they are a bit... 70's. Do you thing washing them in warm water would remove the pressed crease and make it flow a bit better?

 

Also, I typically wear jackets between size 48-50 but this coat is only a smidge large at the shoulders (about the size that my overcoats are). I know Yohji does make some of his pieces with a dropped/oversized shoulder but is there any method to which pieces are meant to be worn oversized vs true? I get the feeling that if I were to wear a size 2, the shoulder would be too small for me which wouldn't make sense with the Yohji fit but since I am the same size as you and you said before that the sizing should go by height, do I think a size 2 would fit better on me than this?

 

Thanks everyone for the help and by the way, I live in Vancouver but don't expect to thrift any good pieces because I have them allbiggrin.gif (at least all of them that are in my size). 

So you think the sleeves are too long? I am particularly picky with sleeve fit in Yohji and whilst most of us agreed that sizing Yohji is based on height ( in general ), so theoretically you and I should find size 2 fits " best ". However some pieces with ultra long sleeves, even in size 2, will dissuade me unless I can alter them. This Look 44 Rider piece is perhaps a cross between a blazer/jacket and a coat especially with a removable vest so I personally will think sleeves just past my knuckles be ideal for a coat.

 

Hong Kong has the best tailors imo and they always prefer to alter from the shoulders to shorten sleeves if possible so not to disturb the working sleeves ( exception being the AW08 Handstitched Series with the shoulder seam finish ). But cutting that much off your piece from the shoulders will reduce the armhole size I fear. Shortening the sleeves from the cuffs and you will lose the working sleeves......dilemma indeed. If this is my piece I will take a chance to shorten from the shoulders unless the tailor suggests otherwise.

 

This being a rider jacket I guess it is supposed to be a casual piece anyway. On the runway it's styled with a high neck and slim fitting cropped pants, shoes w/o socks. I personally never wear shoes w/o socks, a shirt/Tee should work. You have even more options if you don't wear the inner vest. A stupendous piece. I thought the runway was already styled with a dropped shoulder look, no?

 

Finally I thought you need to dry clean the pants and re-press to remove the pressed crease....


Edited by davidlee388 - 11/5/12 at 4:42am
post #3191 of 5741

.


Edited by slstr - 11/6/12 at 1:40pm
post #3192 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidlee388 View Post


Was that shuit who posts regularly on SZ in the background wearing a hat? Or is he featured on People Wearing Yohji Yamamoto instead, or the 2 are the same person?

That's Ko Nakano ナカノ コウ. A great ambassador for Yohji. He does not post on SZ, as far as I'm aware.

post #3193 of 5741
Quote:
The long-range possibilities are staggering. Since most of the Japanese styles can be packed flatly, elaborate closet facilities could become unnecessary. And perhaps some day, a person will have to carry only a toothbrush and some books when visiting a friend for the weekend; the friend will have a supply of easily stored clothes for borrowing.

Haha, if they could only see the hakama pants hanging in my closet with a buffer all around them to keep the pleats in place. However, I do love the idea of traveling with "only a toothbrush and some books" and my friend would have some spare Yohji stuff that I could wear since sizing is irrelevant. happy.gif

- - -

btw, does anyone know which season this long overcoat is from? Black wool with gray and maroon stripes. It's numerical sizing so post-2000. Could it be AW2004?

post #3194 of 5741
YYPH? I'm thinking it could be AW00? Really not sure though, looks nice either way. Like the irregular stripes and the cut. Would love to see some more close ups, the fabric and texture looks great.

Glad to see the thread is still going strong, guys! Been mostly rotating all my regular stuff I've already posted here but just received a couple of things I like a lot so might post some of that.
post #3195 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by asobu View Post

YYPH? I'm thinking it could be AW00? Really not sure though, looks nice either way. Like the irregular stripes and the cut. Would love to see some more close ups, the fabric and texture looks great.
Glad to see the thread is still going strong, guys! Been mostly rotating all my regular stuff I've already posted here but just received a couple of things I like a lot so might post some of that.

Not sure what season but I'm afraid it's a Femme piece, keen eye Asobu! Sneaky Y! seller posting in a mens section.....of course not stopping any guy wearing it smile.gif

In fact looking at the measurements this sz 1 easily bigger than some YYPH current seasons' sz 2 for a coat, so yeah it looks like from the early 00s.
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