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Yohji, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Looser Fit (Yohji Yamamoto Thread) - Page 68

post #1006 of 5741
Thread Starter 
I have only seen a few of his documentaries actually - Notebook on Cities..., Buena Vista Social Club and Pina. Really loved the last two as they both introduced me to artists that were never really on my radar and they had excellent cinematography. I like Notebook, but I do think his experiment with digital and analog filming techniques got a bit long in the tooth during the film. He has a great eye for a photo though.

I think I have seen a few of his wife's photographs online before as well. They looked great together though. Him the seemingly serious intellectual type and her more easygoing and charming.
post #1007 of 5741

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivwri View Post

I have only seen a few of his documentaries actually - Notebook on Cities..., Buena Vista Social Club and Pina. Really loved the last two as they both introduced me to artists that were never really on my radar and they had excellent cinematography. I like Notebook, but I do think his experiment with digital and analog filming techniques got a bit long in the tooth during the film. He has a great eye for a photo though.
I think I have seen a few of his wife's photographs online before as well. They looked great together though. Him the seemingly serious intellectual type and her more easygoing and charming.

 

A great thread, and now Wim Wenders too - you are so lucky to have met him like this. Both Wings of Desire and The End of Violence are among my favourite films...

post #1008 of 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by PregnantBob View Post

What's the pricing like on second hand gear in the tokyo stores? it's getting to winter in Sydney and I really really want a coat and jacket from AW12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivwri View Post

Definitely interested in getting an idea of pricing as well. If Drew was cool with browsing that place would be nice to get an idea of the kinds of things they have in stock.

It's really hard to say, pricing varies quite a lot depending on piece and re-seller. The best thing is that condition is almost always impeccable across the board. There are definitely deals to be had though, but you gotta have a lot of luck (and put in a lot of time). There's a decent amount in rotation but the good stuff sells out pretty much in two-three days or the very same day. Which means you have to check quite often to have a good chance at finding the good stuff. It's pretty much impossible to proxy.
Quote:
At my brother's wedding one of our Japanese friend's wore a raw silk kimono that her grandfather made for her himself. Was so beautiful. Would like to see some pics of yours for sure.

This sounds lovely! Any pics?

Also that's an amazing story, that you met Wim Wenders by chance! I wish you could've snapped a picture of the two of them. I absolutely love Paris, Texas and I like some of his earlier films. Still haven't seen Wings of Desire. I recently saw Lightning over Water and didn't find it that great, same with Notebook... though I prefer the latter for obvious reasons. Really really want to see Pina too. I also share his love for Ozu, possibly my favorite director.
post #1009 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by asobu View Post

It's really hard to say, pricing varies quite a lot depending on piece and re-seller. The best thing is that condition is almost always impeccable across the board. There are definitely deals to be had though, but you gotta have a lot of luck (and put in a lot of time). There's a decent amount in rotation but the good stuff sells out pretty much in two-three days or the very same day. Which means you have to check quite often to have a good chance at finding the good stuff. It's pretty much impossible to proxy.
This sounds lovely! Any pics?
Also that's an amazing story, that you met Wim Wenders by chance! I wish you could've snapped a picture of the two of them. I absolutely love Paris, Texas and I like some of his earlier films. Still haven't seen Wings of Desire. I recently saw Lightning over Water and didn't find it that great, same with Notebook... though I prefer the latter for obvious reasons. Really really want to see Pina too. I also share his love for Ozu, possibly my favorite director.

Well, looks like I have to save any of that Yohji thrifting till I manage to organize a trip to Japan! biggrin.gif

As for the kimono, here's one pic of her in the kimono next to my brother. Not the best pic for showing the detail, but it really looked great in person. The raw silk texture gave it that oomph.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
622
post #1010 of 5741
Thread Starter 
With all the traveling I had to find a way of folding my hakama pants without ruining the pleats altogether and having to steam them out when I get anywhere. Here are two that seem to be useful (about to try them out!). I guess the kendo practitioners could chime in here?
post #1011 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Some more pics

636

531


Really tempted by this jacket because of the line of embroidered patches at the bottom at the back of the jacket, but I think overall it might be a bit much...If only it didn't have the upper arm patches as well.

525


Might go for this if it is not too warm. Wonder what the fabric is.

525

525
post #1012 of 5741

get a tie from yyph, love itsmile.gif

 

在 2012-04-26 14.12 拍摄的照片 #2.jpg

post #1013 of 5741

Some photos of Yohji's work by Sarah Moon.

 

tumblr_lecyu7v6PR1qztk1wo1_500.jpg

 

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post #1014 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Excerpts from a review of the book, Japanese Fashion Designers by Tove Hermanson. The full review can be seen here along with photos and is well worth a read. So is the book if you have the opportunity.
Quote:
The major Japanese designers discussed all create clothes with many flowing layers and with a dominance of the color black, a shocking counterpoint to colorful Western collections. But to the Japanese, black is not drab but rather indicative of restraint and dignity. Samurai were highly respected, fierce and skilled (male) warriors, and in the late 17th century their role changed from military to bureaucratic. Accordingly, their luxurious custom kimonos morphed into darker palettes — black was associated with self-discipline — and with expensive elements hidden, such as decorated silk linings. Subtle — or even private — luxury became preferable to typical Western in-your-face glamor. Ms. English astutely points out that dressing down to dress up, as these understated Japanese textiles and clothes aim to accomplish, was seen in late 18th century England when the landed gentry imitated workers’ dress; the same comparison could be made to pre-revolutionary France when it was actually dangerous for the aristocracy to flaunt their wealth sartorially.
Quote:
This preference for subtlety is rooted in Buddhism which emphasizes the appreciation of poverty, simplicity, and acceptance of imperfection. Challenging the Western artistic conventions of attempting perfection (symmetry, hemmed edges, corsetry to mold an “ideal” figure, etc.), the Japanese typically encourage the (human and therefore fallible) hand of the artist to peek through. Simplicity and perishability are echoed in the Japanese tea ceremony, an everyday task that became an artistic ritual, symbolic of the import of simplicity and the appreciation of perishable goods (as evidenced by the kimono detail below, literally depicting tea ceremony objects).
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Along these lines, Comme des Garçons, founded by Rei Kawakubo in 1969 with Yohji Yamamoto collaborating shortly afterwards, presented “shrouds” at Paris Fashion Week in 1981. Unprepared Westerners dubbed the distressed look the “aesthetics of poverty.” Tellingly, Yamamoto and Kawakubo both grew up in the poverty of post-WWII Japan and perhaps saw beauty in that poverty, because as designers, both favored black, irregular shapes, hugely bulky, layered, torn, uneven and un-stitched hems. This style was later called “deconstructed” and fashion theorists have alternately claimed it represents post-WWII Japan, homelessness, or is a reaction to contemporary global recessions. A perceived affront to the existing ostentatiously glamorous and feminine Paris fashions, it was icily received by the press with harsh headlines smacking of racism, like “Fashion’s Pearl Harbour.” This anti-fashion — asexual and loosely fitting with signals of status overturned — was clearly hard for European audiences to appreciate, but “hifu” is a familiar concept of anti-style, confusion and disarray to the Japanese. Select European artists have, however, experimented with this concept as well. Yamamoto has sited as an influence photographer August Sander and his project of documenting the poor everyman; the Arte Povera art movement of the 1960s also embraced the art of everyday living and the rejection of everything shiny and new as representative of The Establishment.
Quote:
Textiles, as the building block of all garments, are central to these Japanese designers, resulting in collaborative experiments with textile artists. (I actually wish Ms. English had opened the book with the textile artists, as it seems all the fashion designers themselves approach their clothes by addressing textiles first.) Miyake, for example, frequently works with Makiko Minagawa, a textile “artist-engineer.” Miyake has been known to give Minagawa such obtuse and deliberately vague instructions as “Make me a fabric that looks like poison.” While traditional Japanese clothes have been made of natural fibers such as cotton, silk, and paper (for warm linings), Miyake emphasizes the ancient interest and import of industrially produced clothes with synthetic materials, effectively harnessing the past, present and future with such textile breakthroughs as multi-directional pleating , metallic skin encasement, collaged crazy quilt material, and inflatable trousers. Kawakubo, too, is known for her laissez faire collaborative methods and cryptic instructions, like providing a textile designer with a crumpled a piece of paper for inspiration (!!), encouraging others to contribute to her initial concepts.

Another trademark of Japanese fashion seems to be a conceptual approach (as evidenced by obscure textile inspiration), and a questioning of the Western fashion system. Miyake broke boundaries of season-driven conventional fashion and the cult of the young, using older and non-professional models, as in his 1995 “Beautiful Ladies” collection where models were between 62 and 92 years old. Yamamoto’s 2008 collection (the first year of the US depression/recession) included “gauzy rags sewn together with simple white stitches” as though for a funeral procession, according to Eric Wilson of the NYTimes. Comme des Garçons’ Spring/Summer 2002 collection involved models with helmets made of Le Monde newspapers with Taliban war headlines. In spite of the overt political references, Kawakubo claimed it was a last minute decision with no political meaning; she could not protest as strongly in 2003 when her clothes were emblazoned with slogans like “the majority is always wrong,” and “long last the 1 percent.”
post #1015 of 5741
ivwri, if you have a picture of the back of the hakama pants, i might be able to help you more. i have not actually seen the hakama pants in person, so i don't know if the construction is significantly different from that of an actual hakama (though I would assume the pants have two separate pant legs, rather than being a single piece...). it is mostly about laying the pants out flat and pressing out any creases after wear. I fold my hakama after every single practice in the fashion shown in the video. you just lay it flat, layer the pleats as it was originally and try to make sure the sides of the hakama run perfectly vertical and not at an angle. this is to ensure that you are not moving the pleats and are maintaining the original lines of the hakama.

as in the video, you should ensure that the pleats remain sharp by pressing it out after each wear. if you find that the pleats are being lost after each wear, another option would be to iron them. some people do this, but i choose not to because it gives the hakama a shiny sheen, which really detracts from the aesthetic of the kendogi (just wearing a very nice, VERY dark hakama makes your kendo look like it went up a dan level!)

if you want a pictorial guide on top of the video:

http://www.kendo-usa.org/reference/hakama_fold.htm
post #1016 of 5741
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nahneun View Post

ivwri, if you have a picture of the back of the hakama pants, i might be able to help you more. i have not actually seen the hakama pants in person, so i don't know if the construction is significantly different from that of an actual hakama (though I would assume the pants have two separate pant legs, rather than being a single piece...). it is mostly about laying the pants out flat and pressing out any creases after wear. I fold my hakama after every single practice in the fashion shown in the video. you just lay it flat, layer the pleats as it was originally and try to make sure the sides of the hakama run perfectly vertical and not at an angle. this is to ensure that you are not moving the pleats and are maintaining the original lines of the hakama.
as in the video, you should ensure that the pleats remain sharp by pressing it out after each wear. if you find that the pleats are being lost after each wear, another option would be to iron them. some people do this, but i choose not to because it gives the hakama a shiny sheen, which really detracts from the aesthetic of the kendogi (just wearing a very nice, VERY dark hakama makes your kendo look like it went up a dan level!)
if you want a pictorial guide on top of the video:
http://www.kendo-usa.org/reference/hakama_fold.htm

I'll do some pics tomorrow and post 'em up. Thanks for the offer and the additional guide as well.

And yeah, I figured as much that the main thing is to keep them straight on the sides. Will try out the method in the vids and see if that works. So far, I just steam out the wrinkles instead of ironing and that has worked very well so far. But yeah, being able to fold them properly would help a lot as well.
post #1017 of 5741
You know, I've realised something.

Most of us have completely ignored Y-3. I managed to scored a pair of the 10th anniversary Red Combat Boot sneakers when my girlfriend bought me a pair from Colette in Paris... but aside from that... I can't really say I've paid much attention.

Let's discuss.
post #1018 of 5741

I once saw  a pic of this awesome Y-3 jacket that had like this adding and subtracting thing (or it was with phrases, I don´t remember very well) and then it ended with " = Y-3". I thought it was a nice play on words. Sucks that I can´t find the picture of said jacket anywhere online :(

post #1019 of 5741
Y-3 has the label plastered over everything and looks to "athletic"
post #1020 of 5741

It´s supposed to be athletic.

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