or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › First time wearing leather sole dress shoes... am I doing something wrong?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First time wearing leather sole dress shoes... am I doing something wrong? - Page 6

post #76 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

A good way to learn how to walk is to practice, practice, practice with a martini in one hand.
Once mastered, move on to a martini in each hand.

Then on one's head?
post #77 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

A good way to learn how to walk is to practice, practice, practice with a martini in one hand.
Once mastered, move on to a martini in each hand.

Then on one's head?

No, save that for the lamp shade.
post #78 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

A good way to learn how to walk is to practice, practice, practice with a martini in one hand.
Once mastered, move on to a martini in each hand.
Just to amplify what you are saying: just last week, I was surrounded by people falling left and right, all gasping for air. Now I know why
.

Good advice tempered by rough humour. No, No, it's funny Vox. I'm laughing. See? crackup[1].gif

Nevertheless there is real substance behind both assertions.

Stop. Settle into a relaxing chair with your five or six double martinis. Think just for a moment...observe, intelligently...where does your breathing begin (besides, your gills of course)? Where does a breath originate in your body? If it begins low in the diaphragm you are drawing oxygen all the way into the lowest sections of the lungs.Your stomach muscles should expand before anything else happens.

But I have seen studies asserting that most Americans begin a breath in the chest and often high in the chest at that. The chest rises and the diaphragm contracts upward as it is pulled by the chest.

Over the course of a dozen breaths the air in the deepest part of the lungs gets stale..like an old joke. Over the course of a lifetime, It may never get entirely refreshed. And the oxygen supply in your blood stream never reaches the levels it needs to keep the brain from shrinking to the point where adolescent maundering becomes synonymous with wit.
post #79 of 97
That post gives me anxiety.
post #80 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

That post gives me anxiety.

193
post #81 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Good advice tempered by rough humour. No, No, it's funny Vox. I'm laughing. See? crackup[1].gif
Nevertheless there is real substance behind both assertions.
Stop. Settle into a relaxing chair with your five or six double martinis. Think just for a moment...observe, intelligently...where does your breathing begin (besides, your gills of course)? Where does a breath originate in your body? If it begins low in the diaphragm you are drawing oxygen all the way into the lowest sections of the lungs.Your stomach muscles should expand before anything else happens.
But I have seen studies asserting that most Americans begin a breath in the chest and often high in the chest at that. The chest rises and the diaphragm contracts upward as it is pulled by the chest.
Over the course of a dozen breaths the air in the deepest part of the lungs gets stale..like an old joke. Over the course of a lifetime, It may never get entirely refreshed. And the oxygen supply in your blood stream never reaches the levels it needs to keep the brain from shrinking to the point where adolescent maundering becomes synonymous with wit.

In addition to lifting weights four times a week, and cycling during warm months and winter sports in cold months, I do Vinyasa yoga three times a week in a superheated room so that my breathing technique is up to my drinking technique.

So, bottoms up in more ways than one.
post #82 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

In addition to lifting weights four times a week, and cycling during warm months and winter sports in cold months, I do Vinyasa yoga three times a week in a superheated room so that my breathing technique is up to my drinking technique.
So, bottoms up in more ways than one.

I thought that was Bikrham Yoga.
post #83 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

As for not slipping on snow and ice, I've lived in that sort of climate. It's not as hard as you might think. I rarely even thought about it, and this was at a school where there were paths across the snow packed down to ice, which were used as standard sidewalk routes.

Icy paths are quite typical where I am in Ottawa, Canada. Right now, I can barely see asphalt and concrete outside. I remember having to go up and down an icy slope to get to and back from school. One would slip even with boots that had serious treads. In lean years, I walked in sneakers in winter, and I seldom fell.

I'm worried about leather soles on ice only because I've never walked in leather soles on ice. Perhaps it's time for me to get some serious boots with double leather soles.

One last question: insulated boots are probably too warm to wear indoors. For those of you who wear dress boots in winter, are your feet cold when it's -30C/-22F outside? Then again, I've worn sneakers in deep winter, and leather ankle boots must be warmer.
post #84 of 97
As much as I am a huge supporter of leather soles on all terrain, including rainy streets I never fared well with them on ice. Packed snow isn't really an issue if you walk carefully.
post #85 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


As I mentioned previously I have been wearing leather outsoles for most of my life. It may be instructive to add that I grew up, and attended college, in Minnesota.
That said, we can speculate all we want and present our personal anecdotes as gospel but what all of it suggests to me is that slippage has less to do with the leather and more with the gait or balance of the individual.
If you grew up in Minnesota, you also know that people who move there (a rare event) from warmer states usually have trouble driving in snow and ice. I speculate that more accidents in Minnesota are caused by warm weather drivers than by native Minnesotans. Is it the fault of their tires? Which, may I remind us all, are high traction rubber? I don't think so.
If leather outsoles were the issue, the human race would long since be extinct from all the ice related accidents (apocryphal) over the millennia when rubber soles were unknown..


I do understand what your saying, and also thanks for your clarification on my behalf concerning the term farm hand.

 

As to balance I spent 20 years in the Navy with slightly less sea time than Mobby Dick. In addition to rock and roll there is pitch and yaw to contend with at sea, once you can carry a cup of coffee up and down a ladder in heavy seas without spilling it you have "arrived". It takes considerable balance and constant body adjustments to changing conditions to do so. So I'm pretty sure my balance is centered most of the time even on shore. Well with the exception of the Martini training previously mentioned by someone else but I hope they don't count! I'd hate to say that I ever grew up but I was raised in NY and I have noticed that in winter most Minnesotans do the same penguin walk, or rather shuffle, that I remember. At least outside.

 

post #86 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asian Afro View Post


Icy paths are quite typical where I am in Ottawa, Canada. Right now, I can barely see asphalt and concrete outside. I remember having to go up and down an icy slope to get to and back from school. One would slip even with boots that had serious treads. In lean years, I walked in sneakers in winter, and I seldom fell.
I'm worried about leather soles on ice only because I've never walked in leather soles on ice. Perhaps it's time for me to get some serious boots with double leather soles.
One last question: insulated boots are probably too warm to wear indoors. For those of you who wear dress boots in winter, are your feet cold when it's -30C/-22F outside? Then again, I've worn sneakers in deep winter, and leather ankle boots must be warmer.


For teens and 20's below as long as I'm not outside much more than 10-15 minutes or so I've been fine, I wear smartwool socks though. For extremely icy conditions I wear hiking boots and strap on a pair of Stabilicers. They work great but you have to take them off as soon as you hit the inside of a building. I have a spare piece of carpet in my office to put my Stabilicers and or boots on when I have to wear them. But rarely do as I have come to the point where I hate carrying anything to and from work.

 

post #87 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I thought that was Bikrham Yoga.

Bikram yoga is literally the specific yoga practice developed by Bikram Choudhury involving about 30 or so specific poses done in a hot room configured in a certain way with mirrors, mats, etc.. Vinyasa is much more general, and can be done in heated or unheated rooms. The common theme in Vinyasa is breath synchronization with the movements and held poses, which is why it is also often referred to as "flow" yoga.

So, between the walking around with martinis in my hand (ability card: walking, alcohol metablization), road cycling, mountain biking, rowing, riding horsies, XC skiing (ability card: aerobic endurance), weight training (ability card: superhuman strength), and the yoga (ability card: deep, focused, sentient breathing), I have the minimum training and background needed to wear both oxford and derby, balmoral and blucher, successfully without keeling over or gasping for air.

This is what DWF is talking about: not everyone can wear shoes.
post #88 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Think just for a moment...observe, intelligently...where does your breathing begin (besides, your gills of course)?

If we are talking about SF members, I can only extrapolate from their posts: my guess is that the breaths of most begin and end with their mouths open.

Am I right?

confused.gif
post #89 of 97
I think I have this whole Topy thing figured out. The idea is to use rubber to protect the leather. I think the image below would address part of the OP's problem.

I just don't see myself putting Topy on any of my shoes.

234
post #90 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Bikram yoga is literally the specific yoga practice developed by Bikram Choudhury involving about 30 or so specific poses done in a hot room configured in a certain way with mirrors, mats, etc.. Vinyasa is much more general, and can be done in heated or unheated rooms. The common theme in Vinyasa is breath synchronization with the movements and held poses, which is why it is also often referred to as "flow" yoga.
So, between the walking around with martinis in my hand (ability card: walking, alcohol metablization), road cycling, mountain biking, rowing, riding horsies, XC skiing (ability card: aerobic endurance), weight training (ability card: superhuman strength), and the yoga (ability card: deep, focused, sentient breathing), I have the minimum training and background needed to wear both oxford and derby, balmoral and blucher, successfully without keeling over or gasping for air.

This is what DWF is talking about: not everyone can wear shoes.


Hahaha....damn right! cheers.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › First time wearing leather sole dress shoes... am I doing something wrong?