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Lower Back Pain

post #1 of 127
Thread Starter 
As in, lower lower back, or upper butt, around where the pelvic bone is.

I'm pretty sure the cause is bad form deadlifting. I've been to a coach and I think I have the form down. My plan was to wait until the pain is totally gone, the muscles healed, and then start over with very low weight until I am absolutely sure that I have form correct and then slowly add weight.

Well, it's been eleven freaking days since I last lifted and my damned back still hurts. Is that normal?

I am frustrated here. I've tried stretching but that seems like it makes things worse.

Advice?
post #2 of 127
What kind of pain are we talking about here? Sharp, shooting pain? Dull, aching pain?

I don't have my dead lift form down pat so I tend to get back pain after as well. It's more of a dull aching pain and it tends to go away after a couple days. I would advise against stretching it because, well, my pain always seemed to be exacerbated by movement.

Eleven days seems to be a long time but if you've been stretching and using your back as you say, that might be the reason why. If I were you, i'd let your back rest and go easy for the next few days and see if it subsides. If it still aches, then get it checked out.
post #3 of 127
Thread Starter 
It's a pain I feel only when I bend in a certain way, basically when I round my lower back, which I try not to do.

But is that normal? I realize you never want to bend over at the waist to lift something heavy but sometimes I feel it just bending over to pick up a piece of paper. I also get it bending my leg to put on pants or socks or shoes. Normal sitting or standing are mostly fine.
post #4 of 127
Sounds exactly how my pain gets triggered as well. I'll get back pain induced by some of the weirdest movements that you wouldn't think involves using the back muscles.

The less you trigger that pain, though, the faster it should heal. How old are you? Age also plays a huge factor in recovery speeds.
post #5 of 127
Thread Starter 
over 40, which I guess doesn't help
post #6 of 127
I'd consider doing a sumo deadlift. Since your quite old I wouldn't risk the potential to fuck up your lower back on a conventional. Sumo basically takes away all the stress on your lower back. Don't know what you should do about your current pain though.
post #7 of 127
Thread Starter 
But I want to work my lower back and strengthen it.

Don't I? I just don't want it to hurt.
post #8 of 127
I've got pretty big spinal errectors and I pull sumo. The lower back is supposed to be worked isometrically during both the sumo deadlift and the conventional deadlift. During the conventional deadlift it is much easier to pull with the lower back though by bending it and then straightening it out. If you do either of them properly you shouldn't hurt your lower back, but it's easier to have shit form on the conventional especially if your lower back is the weak point in your deadlift muscles.
post #9 of 127
How are your core muscles? Abs?

I have something sort-of similar - I have a bulging disc on my L5 (just above where you described your pain) due to racing shifter karts and formula - and I used to have serious prolonged pains. I couldn't quite find the right posture when driving my car, sitting down in a movie theatre or when I'm sleeping - I'd have to put a pillow to follow the natural arch of my back.

My stretching helped alot but it got better when I worked on my core, abs, and obliques. After developing those, then I went to focus on the back workouts like Good Mornings, and Romanian dead-lifts, etc. (light weights though, just more reps)
post #10 of 127
Have you seen a chiropractor yet? I've had good luck with a couple, when I was in debilitating pain over the years.

That said, ice and ibuprofen go a long way.
post #11 of 127
Thread Starter 
Core seems to be pretty good.
post #12 of 127
Its been 11 fucking days Manton. Take it easy man. Shit takes time to heal. I'm several years into an injury. The body's a weird thing. Keep icing and using Advil/Aleve. Then, in another week or so, start stretching it out.

As solid as you think your core might be, you should be twice that to achieve solid core strength.
post #13 of 127
I had the same symptoms you describe. I went to see a physio and he described it as an inflammation of the gel between the discs in the back that then pinches nerves that run through hips and legs. So how did he fix?

1) stop all weights for atleast 2 weeks (full recovery can take up to 6 weeks)
2) take an anti inflamatory for a few days so you have the stuff in the system
3) he did some massages around the area to loosen back
4) prescribed a push up style exercise to arch the back

Also suggested getting up out of the office chair as sitting down is not great for back and spine. His bottom line was that the back, disks, spine needs to be stretched out.
post #14 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star View Post

I had the same symptoms you describe. I went to see a physio and he described it as an inflammation of the gel between the discs in the back that then pinches nerves that run through hips and legs. So how did he fix?
1) stop all weights for atleast 2 weeks (full recovery can take up to 6 weeks)
2) take an anti inflamatory for a few days so you have the stuff in the system
3) he did some massages around the area to loosen back
4) prescribed a push up style exercise to arch the back
Also suggested getting up out of the office chair as sitting down is not great for back and spine. His bottom line was that the back, disks, spine needs to be stretched out.

+1 to that. The lower spine relies on a multitude of muscles aligning correctly for it to work well. Once muscle gets pulled, everything is out of wack. My advice for you would be the exact same as above. Take it easy on the lifting, take some NSAIDS (go for ibuprofen, it won't upset your stomach in larger doses). Put some ice on it ~1 a day, maybe get a lady friend to massage it for you. Also, here's some exercises/stretches you can do that will help:

http://www.webmd.com/back-pain/exercises-to-reduce-low-back-pain

Hope you feel better soon!

Sources: I'm a medical student...
post #15 of 127
Look up piriformis stretches. A tight piriformis muscle would give you that pain in your upper hip and would also cause tightness/pain in the back. It's not really something that gets worked much from normal activity, so it can take a long time to loosen up if that happens to be the issue.


Did you ever have one day where your back hurt suddenly and severely from deadlifting, or did it just sort of start hurting without any obvious cause?
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