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How to judge flatware quality? - Page 3

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by fletchandme View Post
For stainless flatware, the higher the nickel content, the higher the quality. The first # refers to chromium, the second # to nickel. Therefore, 18/10 is better than 18/8. You don't want to buy 18/0 flatware, which is usually what is available at a lot of discount stores. Nickel prevents corrosion and adds weight. 18/12 is the best I have found.

So, how does one find quality flatware. I have some oneida I bought really cheap. And I ended up with marks all over the my corelle ware. My mom said it was because the flatware had to much nickle in it. Anyone know anything about this?

Someone else commented on their flatware getting rust spots. What causes this?

And how do you find stuff that doesn't get a bunch of water spots?
post #32 of 54
little off topic but my mom got me some really nice 100 year old flatware for christmas. I will have to post photos when I get it. Some of the art work is just amazing. The term they don't build them like thye used to really does apply.
post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by turboman808 View Post
little off topic but my mom got me some really nice 100 year old flatware for christmas. I will have to post photos when I get it. Some of the art work is just amazing. The term they don't build them like thye used to really does apply.

Oh yes they do. you just gotta pay lots of money, but it's possible.
post #34 of 54
It's still possible to get the good English or American stuff.

All this will pass shortly, so if you don't have any already, it is worth getting it now even if incrementally.

The Old Newbury stuff of various vintages is what we have.

- B
post #35 of 54
I believe Henckels isn't the same as J. A. Henckel.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by js4design View Post
i know this wasn't really the original question but i thought i'd share my flatware (stock photo).



the finish could be better but overall i love them. nice heavy feeling in hand and the lines compliment my simple plates and dining table.

I love the simplicity.
Where can I get this?
post #37 of 54
I was invited to a well-heeled dinner last night. This was the flatware. Based on the shapes and weights, it was very obvious this was not "basic" stuff. Which makes it a good value, if you're trying to impress or show wealth. http://www.dansk.com/pg/index.cfm?fu...d=842&sc=&kf=5
post #38 of 54
I inherited a set of early 1900s Georg Jensen flatware that was my parents', and before that my grandmother's, and before that my great grandmother's. I still use it daily. Freaking amazing stuff. Has not tarnished whatsoever, very clean aesthetic, and well balanced.
post #39 of 54
Georg Jensen flatware. Awesome. $95 AB, any update on the career musings?
post #40 of 54
We use these.


- B
post #41 of 54
Do not get anything made in China, even if it is designer stuff. Their stainless steal flatware develops rust spots. As far as silver flatware is concerned ; yes it is very healthy to eat from silver and especially drink from silver cups, but the trouble of hand-washing it and keeping it polished and tarnish-free is too great unless you have maids .
post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pezzaturra View Post
Do not get anything made in China, even if it is designer stuff. Their stainless steal flatware develops rust spots.

As far as silver flatware is concerned ; yes it is very healthy to eat from silver and especially drink from silver cups, but the trouble of hand-washing it and keeping it polished and tarnish-free is too great unless you have maids .

I hardly ever use my silver. 2-3 times a year max. I don't know how others feel about this but after I clean my silver I apply car wax. Keeps it tarnish free alot longer.
post #43 of 54
If you want guaranteed quality, buy cutlery from Sheffield, made in the traditional way. Carrs and Price both produce fine flatware, with good steel and well finished (18/10 is a broad brush when describing steels, there are many that fit this description but with other differences, good luck learning the specifics though). They also produce a wide range of silverware, all of excellent quality. Robinson is very much the real deal, perhaps the most traditional maker left, they only make silver as far as I am aware.

I think it is certainly worth investing in good stainless for everyday use, after all, my stainless cutlery is used far more often than my silver. Robert Welch produce great modern cutlery, again in Sheffield and in the traditional way. The finish, weight and design of the pieces is superb, while somewhat pricey, they will last and last, giving pleasure to every successive generation of users.

Echoing what has been said before, buying anything marketed as premium, but made in China is a risk, you can only guess what short cuts might have been taken in their manufacture. And for the love of God, buy your forks with four tines.
post #44 of 54
Anyone own SS flatware with a satin finish? How does it look over time?

Looking at some Robert Welch stuff right now. It's really nice stuff.
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
Anyone own SS flatware with a satin finish? How does it look over time?

Looking at some Robert Welch stuff right now. It's really nice stuff.

If it's for daily use and goes in the daily drawer it's gonna get beat up rather quickly. If it's for special occasions and you keep it in a flatware box then it will last for years to come.

I recently got some polished stainless steel and I got to say I rather like it. Looks fantastic and other then washing by hand and drying it requires very little work to keep it looking great.


BTW Little off topic

With silver prices thru the roof I started getting uncomfortable having such a large sterling collection just laying around the house. Have close to 700 troy oz I figured. That got me very nervous and I put it all into storage. So now I am collecting alot of lead crystal to replace the sterling. Oddly enough lead crystal was 5-10 times the price 5 years ago. Now it can be had for very little money. Now is a great time to buy crystal if you enjoy that kind of stuff.

Just bought a new dinner set as well. Noritake Crestwood Cobalt Platinum. Very reminiscent of high end dinnerware of the late 1800s but at 1/10th the price. Sorry way off topic now. Just a hobby I really do enjoy.
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