or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How much do you pay for a shoe-shine?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How much do you pay for a shoe-shine? - Page 5

post #61 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by tropics View Post

how dare you

I felt bad for him, brah. He's only 4 posts in and I wouldn't want him to run away after an incident with the "man who dyes used gloves."
post #62 of 91
Ah, much obliged.
post #63 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treko View Post

Well I have to disagree on a few points. (i) Slavery, for example, is not honest work -- quite the antithesis, I'd say that's about as dishonest as any industry can be. These people are either self-employed or work for small businesses, so the comparison is not well taken. (ii) My point was not that I or anyone else is incapable of shining our own shoes (I have done it before, and will again when the need arises), but rather that the simple fact that I can do something does not mean it is morally repugnant for me to pay someone who specializes in the same task (and has both higher levels of skill and economy in terms of time); especially when the effect of that attitude would be to deprive the shoe-shiner of work. (iii) The reasons many people opt for the quick 'on-the-foot' shine have to do with the speed of the service and the on-the-go fix for scuffed or worn looking shoes. While some may affect that look in certain circumstances, in others it is shabby and potentially even disrespectful of those you may be meeting with. Obviously this is something of a 'micro-cultural' phenomena, but in certain industries (banking, the law &c.) in NYC, at least, people tend to opt for highly bulled dress shoes.
'Off-the-foot' shines and shoe repair are not uncommon, but serve different functions and offer different benefits (and generally demand more time -- a day or sometimes more vs. two or three minutes). I sense some cognitive dissonance when the same work, hidden from the eyes of the customer, is somehow more noble and less degrading. I suppose it is the height of the chairs used that inspire discomfort in your view of the practice (ironically, they are propped up as a matter of sensitivity to the posture of the employee -- not to instill some regal self-regard in the customer). I think to assume people get shoe-shines to feed some vapid need to feel superior to another person is reading into the entire scenario something that isn't there.
I could buy starch and various steamers and irons and laundry equipment and expertly launder and dry clean my shirts and suits. I could refuse every opportunity to ride in a cab because I am quite capable of driving and could rent a car instead. I could cut my own hair (again, with less but passable skill) instead of mocking the barber by sitting in his chair. I could make myself dinner every night of the year, and never imply to a restaurants' wait staff that I am somehow their better because their job requires carrying out my meal. I could refuse the assistance of bellhops, being physically capable of carrying my own bags to my hotel room.
My ability to accomplish any or all of these tasks without relying on the services of other people is not really the point (in my view). In taking the above course of action I would be selfishly denying the right of other people to make a living out of zealous individualism, weighing down my schedule with countless extra tasks (that in the past might have been carried out by domestic labor, a more degrading institution in my opinion) and achieving lesser results. Or I could employ the services of my neighbors, as they employ mine. These people are not servants or slaves, they are industrious and free people who are working hard to make a living. I have worked as a waiter and a caddy, and would not have been thrilled had customers persistently 'honored' me by bussing their own tables and carrying their own golf bags (many of them perfectly capable of both).
Everyone must pick and choose what services and people he has the resources and need to do business with, and what tasks he must handle himself. But I see no need to yoke some moral judgment on this particular service because it is not altogether common in every part of the country. Where the market exists it exists for a reason, and barring some evidence that it is truly exploitative or unfair I see no reason why people should not be free to make up their own minds on whether to frequent such a business, or employ such a service.

you make some good points, however getting your shoe shined is still degrading, i have superior moral judgement and would feel quite bad if i stepped into a mens store and forced another man to bend down and wipe my shoes. it would be hard to not think how pathetic that man is. paying them money, or paying him a big tip to vainly attempt to relieve my conscience won't change that the work is degrading and entirely preventable. seems we have culture of acceptable degradation. just because one desperately needs money and takes a shoe shine job, or just because he is good at it, or efficient at it, doesn't mean it should be done.
post #64 of 91
Iroh, perhaps you could instruct us on the proper way to refill disposable Bic pens that have run out of ink. Much appreciated.
post #65 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treko View Post

In NYC almost every shoe shine stand charges $3 for the shine itself, and $2 is a typical tip.
This is for sitting in the chair and getting your shoes quickly spit-shined (no actual spit)/ bulled. If you drop off a pair of shoes at a cobbler or shoe repair shop they may charge a bit more.
Unless you have a good deal of polish, wax and skill you won't be able to achieve the high-gloss shine these guys can achieve, they look better than new (and they do it in a few minutes tops, so it's on with the commute).

Agreed. I don't have a set or anything, but $5 every now and then (I get 1 pair of shoes shined once a month) i rotate them. But I cannot shine my shoes as well as the guys at the stands. They clean the dirt off and have an assortment of polish.
post #66 of 91
I have also struggled with this. I do feel awkward getting my shoes shined. That said, it's a little convenient (and well done!) to resist. I don't feel bad when it's a bigger shop, though, for instance, at NY Penn Station there's a shoe shine like madhouse, and I feel more comfortable when there are at least five other dudes getting a shine at the same time. That sounded wrong.
post #67 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirGrotius View Post

I have also struggled with this. I do feel awkward getting my shoes shined. That said, it's a little convenient (and well done!) to resist. I don't feel bad when it's a bigger shop, though, for instance, at NY Penn Station there's a shoe shine like madhouse, and I feel more comfortable when there are at least five other dudes getting a shine at the same time. That sounded wrong.
Perhaps because in the 'bigger shop' those being shone can converse among themselves and/or read their papers and avoid superfluous exchanges with those doing the shining who remain free to converse among themselves. This way there is only limited exchange between the two very different socioeconomic backgrounds.

Personally I choose never to remain in my shoes when they are being shined. It's also not an act I want performed in public.
post #68 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Treko, Iroh is a troll. He repairs holes in dirty socks and uses a kitchen knife to scratch up the soles of his new shoes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

I felt bad for him, brah. He's only 4 posts in and I wouldn't want him to run away after an incident with the "man who dyes used gloves."
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Iroh, perhaps you could instruct us on the proper way to refill disposable Bic pens that have run out of ink. Much appreciated.

Looks like you are the troll, I made legitimate posts in this thread, if you don't like it then put me on your ignore list.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SirGrotius View Post

I have also struggled with this. I do feel awkward getting my shoes shined. That said, it's a little convenient (and well done!) to resist. I don't feel bad when it's a bigger shop, though, for instance, at NY Penn Station there's a shoe shine like madhouse, and I feel more comfortable when there are at least five other dudes getting a shine at the same time. That sounded wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

Perhaps because in the 'bigger shop' those being shone can converse among themselves and/or read their papers and avoid superfluous exchanges with those doing the shining who remain free to converse among themselves. This way there is only limited exchange between the two very different socioeconomic backgrounds.
Personally I choose never to remain in my shoes when they are being shined. It's also not an act I want performed in public.

+2
post #69 of 91
I pay $3 in NYC and add $2 in tip, sometimes $3

I pay $18 for a haircut and tip $8 - plus another $20-$40 during the holidays
post #70 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by iroh View Post

Looks like you are the troll, I made legitimate posts in this thread, if you don't like it then put me on your ignore list.
+2

Iroh, you wound me. I would never put you on ignore. I love each and every one of your posts. By no means should you stop. Thank you for all you've done.

Kisses,

Harvey
post #71 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike147 View Post

I pay $3 in NYC and add $2 in tip, sometimes $3
I pay $18 for a haircut and tip $8 - plus another $20-$40 during the holidays

Your a heavy tipper man. Thats some nice gratuity.
post #72 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by dks202 View Post


Next time you're in San Antonio try the North Star Barber Shop on Rector St. Real haircut, hot lather shave, good shine. You can even drink a beer and shoot pool while you wait.

 

I do that here:http://mensroomsalon.com/, trying to convince the ladies that a shoeshine stand would make bank.


 

 

post #73 of 91

On Long Island and NYC they usually charge $3, I just give them a $5. They really work it sometimes 5 or 10 minutes..

post #74 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Iroh, perhaps you could instruct us on the proper way to refill disposable Bic pens that have run out of ink. Much appreciated.

lol8[1].gif
post #75 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by iroh View Post

getting your shoe shined is still degrading, i have superior moral judgement and would feel quite bad if i stepped into a mens store and forced another man to bend down and wipe my shoes. it would be hard to not think how pathetic that man is. paying them money, or paying him a big tip to vainly attempt to relieve my conscience won't change that the work is degrading and entirely preventable. seems we have culture of acceptable degradation. just because one desperately needs money and takes a shoe shine job, or just because he is good at it, or efficient at it, doesn't mean it should be done.

Would it be degrading to hire someone to polish my gloves? Or should I be doing this myself.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How much do you pay for a shoe-shine?