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Bar-Mitzvah dress code? - Page 4

post #46 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by allaboutshoes View Post


This is incorrect; That is referring to leprosy
Again, it is referring to leprosy not mold.
I wonder when Spoo is converting lol8[1].gif


My understanding is that Leviticus 13 1-46 discusses leprosy specifically while 47-59 is for molds in general.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


Taken somewhat out of context, but that aside -
Your question seems to suggest that you believe it's okay to wear moldy clothing to non-Jewish religious ceremonies. Whereas I would think this to be something of a faux pas across most religious lines.
("Chuck, I'd be honored to serve as your best man. And since you're getting married at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, and not at Temple Beth Shalom, I think I'll wear my charcoal suit with the visible green mold.")
--
Michael

 

While I agree with your sentiment, I simply find it interesting that regulations for mold were explicitly discussed in the Bible whereas today it is simply assumed that moldy clothing should not be worn. 

post #47 of 63
Strangely fun thread. A few interesting facts:

There has been a Jewish community in China for over a thousand years.

There are also several different sects of African Jews -- one of which is believed to be at least two thousand years old, and another which was started in Zimbabwe by a freed American slave who converted to Judaism.

There is a cemetery in Richmond, Virginia exclusively for Jewish Confederate soldiers.

Of the 850 Nobel Prizes awarded between 1901 and 2011, 170 were awarded to Jews.

That is all.
post #48 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

Didnt put the hat on and during the ceremony some woman behind me (say this out loud in a NY accent) said "what, no yamaka?"
True, you should have been wearing a yarmulke, but If she really said it loudly (as opposed to it seeming loud to an embarrassed 12 year old), she behaved somewhat rudely.

What can I tell you? Examples of impolite behavior can be found in all religious flavors.

As an aside, I'd note that the wearing of a head covering at Jewish religious services is simply a gesture of respect a guest shows to his hosts. It is not in any way an acceptance of Judaism or an insult to one's own faith. I mention this, as some 12 year olds, or some adults with perhaps limited exposure to other faiths, might worry about this point. As it's not really a religious ritual, it's rather like a non-Moslem politely removing his shoes when visiting a mosque, and not at all like a non-Catholic taking communion when attending a Catholic wedding mass.
Quote:
I went to this box where you borrow one and put it on. I lacked experience because after about 10 minutes it fell off the back of my head and dropped into the aisle behind me.
It happens. I attended a burial at a Jewish cemetery one very windy day, where the air was thick with flying skull caps. Hey, it's the intent that matters, right?
--
Michael
post #49 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

True, you should have been wearing a yarmulke, but If she really said it loudly (as opposed to it seeming loud to an embarrassed 12 year old), she behaved somewhat rudely.
What can I tell you? Examples of impolite behavior can be found in all religious flavors.
As an aside, I'd note that the wearing of a head covering at Jewish religious services is simply a gesture of respect a guest shows to his hosts. It is not in any way an acceptance of Judaism or an insult to one's own faith. I mention this, as some 12 year olds, or some adults with perhaps limited exposure to other faiths, might worry about this point. As it's not really a religious ritual, it's rather like a non-Moslem politely removing his shoes when visiting a mosque, and not at all like a non-Catholic taking communion when attending a Catholic wedding mass.
It happens. I attended a burial at a Jewish cemetery one very windy day, where the air was thick with flying skull caps. Hey, it's the intent that matters, right?
--
Michael

Na, I wasnt bothered

But fuck ya, she said that shit really loud, from like 3 rows behind me

I actually thought since I was not a member of the faith that I was not supposed to wear one. When she said that I realized I was doing something wrong and went to get one. Then God cast it off my head into the row behind me for some reason.
post #50 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Solomon View Post



My understanding is that Leviticus 13 1-46 discusses leprosy specifically while 47-59 is for molds in general.


While I agree with your sentiment, I simply find it interesting that regulations for mold were explicitly discussed in the Bible whereas today it is simply assumed that moldy clothing should not be worn. 

not sure how serious you are. but again, those verses are referring neither to leprosy nor mold.
post #51 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

Then God cast it off my head into the row behind me for some reason.
His Noodliness works in mysterious ways.

232
--
Michael
post #52 of 63

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post


not sure how serious you are. but again, those verses are referring neither to leprosy nor mold.


I studied theology so I understand what you're saying but such an interpretation makes the verses entirely irrelevant to this thread  lol8[1].gif

post #53 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Solomon View Post




I studied theology so I understand what you're saying but such an interpretation makes the verses entirely irrelevant to this thread  lol8%5B1%5D.gif

touche laugh.gif

- a man who is unable to laugh, will bear the burden of shame and suffering for generations.

(in stitches; 14:27)
post #54 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

its not really leprosy that the verse is referring to either. its a spiritual affliction that manifests itself physically. since it sounds similar in description to leprosy it is often referred to as such. however, that too is really a misnomer.
laugh.gif

I originally took the word 'mold' in Leviticus to actually mean mold, a type of fungus. Which to me seamed quite plausible method of dealing with a hygiene and health problem, given that things could be rather primitive in those days, i.e. a lack of proper health care and modern laundering methods. Much of the Old Testament seems to be about giving advice on problems and issues that might have arisen at the time. Like what to do in the event of a big flood.

I was quoting the New International Version rather than the ancient King James one, where the meanings of some words might have changed since the 17th century. So it's either leprosy or a spiritual affliction? smile.gif
post #55 of 63
if you ask me, it is a spiritual affliction, with a physical manifestation. period. not mold, leprosy, nor a public health or hygiene suggestion.
post #56 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post

Na, I wasnt bothered
But fuck ya, she said that shit really loud, from like 3 rows behind me
I actually thought since I was not a member of the faith that I was not supposed to wear one. When she said that I realized I was doing something wrong and went to get one. Then God cast it off my head into the row behind me for some reason.

I'm going to guess this wasn't at a temple in McLean, because my temple is ~10 minutes from the heart of McLean and I'd venture to say that over half the men don't wear yarmulkes, even on the high holidays.
post #57 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by rathebaindc View Post

I'm going to guess this wasn't at a temple in McLean, because my temple is ~10 minutes from the heart of McLean and I'd venture to say that over half the men don't wear yarmulkes, even on the high holidays.

It was actually in Bethesda, MD about 25 years ago.
post #58 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

if you ask me, it is a spiritual affliction, with a physical manifestation. period. not mold, leprosy, nor a public health or hygiene suggestion.

Isn't this down to how one interprets what one reads in the Bible?

Myself, I'm just reading it as it is, almost like a book of instructions and advice. e.g. if there's a big flood it's probably a good idea to build an ark. Or if your clothes get a certain type of mold, burn them.

That's why I thought Leviticus was referring to mold as what I know as mold. Although I'm of no particular faith or religion, or have any definite beliefs

Oh well enough on this subject from me. smile.gif
post #59 of 63
im not a huge fan of bible interpretation, but this aint the place for that discussion. anyhow that is why i prefaced with "if you ask me." i understand there are other opinions on the matter.

now back to bar mitzvahs and flying head coverings smile.gif
post #60 of 63
My son just had his Bar Mitzvah 2 weeks ago. Our congregation is reform. On Friday night I wore a black suit, grey striped shirt, and a tie (all from BB). On Saturday afternoon I wore a grey window pane suit, lavender shirt, and tie (all from BB). Someone had mentioned earlier about the kids dressing up and they were dead on. Most of the young men had suits on. From the adult men, I saw a mixture from suits, SC, and just plain shirts and ties. At the reception, I changed into more of what I would call "club" clothes after all the announcements were over and the DJ was going.
Jon
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