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Are Shoe Trees Important - Page 7

post #91 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDiaz View Post

Newspaper will stretch your shoes in the long run, so beware.

yes, but it depends highly on the density and shape of the paper wad

ive managed to rounden my chisel-lasted shoes into more elegant curves this way
post #92 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post

You wear Dockers, therefore your opinion is null and void.

x2. When one of us has a question on how to treat our piece of garbage shoes we bought at the mall for $19.95 we'll be happy to defer to atlrus' opinion.
post #93 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

x2. When one of us has a question on how to treat our piece of garbage shoes we bought at the mall for $19.95 we'll be happy to defer to atlrus' opinion.

exactly
post #94 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post

So according to a couple of high-end shoe makers here in NY - don't use them unless they are built to the correct last - their argument being that they will stretch your shoes out in funny ways in they aren't shaped correctly.
They suggested stuffing them with socks or something to preserve the shape but be somewhat shape conforming...


I agree with this, it makes perfect sense.

I personally never had problems with too much moisture or the shoes "collapsing" from just sitting on the shoe rack (I have a cheap pair of Dockers bought 6-7 years ago and they still look just fine), but if I had to use anything I would simply stuff the shoes with newspaper. Much greater and faster moisture absorbance than a piece of wood and will add uniform pressure throughout the shoe.


Newspaper tends to stain my cream vicuna socks.
post #95 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORE View Post

WHY DO YOU HATE SHOE TREES SO MUCH?????

laugh.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post

You wear Dockers, therefore your opinion is null and void.

lol. TRUTH!
post #96 of 115

LOL, In my initial post I was going to say that most people using shoe trees are just being snobbish, but I though to myself "maybe I'd be  wrong for saying that?"...haha, I guess my initial impressions were correct.

 

BTW, I don't put on $500 shoes to do yard work. If you do - more power to you.

post #97 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post

BTW, I don't put on $500 shoes to do yard work. If you do - more power to you.


On Styleforum we have people to do our yardwork for us. fing02[1].gif
Edited by Sanguis Mortuum - 12/26/11 at 1:04pm
post #98 of 115
Quote:
On Styleforum we have people to our yardwork for us. fing02[1].gif



Sure, sure.

post #99 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post

LOL, In my initial post I was going to say that most people using shoe trees are just being snobbish, but I though to myself "maybe I'd be wrong for saying that?"...haha, I guess my initial impressions were correct.

BTW, I don't put on $500 shoes to do yard work. If you do - more power to you.


Cordovan boots can really take a beating in the yard while protecting your feet.
post #100 of 115

shoe trees can be heavy as well

post #101 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronaldobaldi View Post

shoe trees can be heavy as well

What?.....eh.gif
post #102 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post



lol, I don't really hate shoe trees. The day I start having strong feelings toward something like shoe trees would be the day I commit myself.

I just think they fail to deliver what some people claim:
1. Unless they are made from balsa wood, moisture absorption would be very minimal and slow.
2. Unless they were custom made to fit your shoe precisely - I don't see how they would help retain the original shape of the shoe. They should look like this: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
350x169px-LL-82d5b9ae_ae-home-virtualfitguide.jpeg

Sigh. Check it, son:

263
263
263

Did you notice teh shape? Size and width on the box? Price? Granted these were made for a specific shoe in a specific size (EG 888 12.5/13D) and are very hard to come by these days. Not so for other makes/models.

In akshion:

263
263
467
263
263
263

EG 888 with a 202 based tree size 13D (shoe size is 12.5/13D)

263

EG 82 with a 202 based tree size 13D (shoe size is 12/12.5E)

263

EG 202 with a 202 based tree size 13D (shoe size is 12/12.5E)

263

All of the above I've had now going on 2 years.

They even work on shoes not EG:

263
263

Any questions?
post #103 of 115

 

Quote:
Any questions?

 

Yes, did you actually read my post?!? :)

 

This is what I said: Unless they were custom made to fit your shoe precisely - I don't see how they would help retain the original shape of the shoe.

 

Yours were clearly made to fit your exact foot size, not something you grab for $19 from the shelf. And as many of us clearly can see from the brag photos you have posted - a lot of those shoes would end up with stretched heelcaps. You can clearly see the difference in the last three photos - great fit on the EG202 compared with the last two photos, where the heels of the upper are extremely overstretched and will certainly deform your shoe, i.e. the exact opposite effect most try to achieve with shoe trees. I can even see the trees pushing on the toes of the suede...

 

In addition, my first point had to do with moisture absorption. Lacquered shoe trees like those would absorb exactly zero moisture from your shoe. The sole purpose of almost every kind of sealant brushed on wood is to prevent moisture seeping into the wood and prevent the growth of mold. In addition, the majority of wood is very, very, very slow to absorb (and give away) moisture, certainly not as fast as most people think. If you want to dry wood naturally, it would take literally years, same goes for moisture, that's why manufacturers employ artificial methods for both to speed up the process, while the best smoking pipes are made from brier which has been naturally dried for 10+ years.

 

 

Anyhow, thanks for helping me illustrate my point by posting those photos, I wouldn't have gone that distance myself, since it's not all that important. You want to use shoe trees - use shoe trees. biggrin.gif

post #104 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Yes, did you actually read my post?!? smile.gif

This is what I said: Unless they were custom made to fit your shoe precisely - I don't see how they would help retain the original shape of the shoe.

Yours were clearly made to fit your exact foot size, not something you grab for $19 from the shelf. And as many of us clearly can see from the brag photos you have posted - a lot of those shoes would end up with stretched heelcaps. You can clearly see the difference in the last three photos - great fit on the EG202 compared with the last two photos, where the heels of the upper are extremely overstretched and will certainly deform your shoe, i.e. the exact opposite effect most try to achieve with shoe trees. I can even see the trees pushing on the toes of the suede...

In addition, my first point had to do with moisture absorption. Lacquered shoe trees like those would absorb exactly zero moisture from your shoe. The sole purpose of almost every kind of sealant brushed on wood is to prevent moisture seeping into the wood and prevent the growth of mold. In addition, the majority of wood is very, very, very slow to absorb (and give away) moisture, certainly not as fast as most people think. If you want to dry wood naturally, it would take literally years, same goes for moisture, that's why manufacturers employ artificial methods for both to speed up the process, while the best smoking pipes are made from brier which has been naturally dried for 10+ years.


Anyhow, thanks for helping me illustrate my point by posting those photos, I wouldn't have gone that distance myself, since it's not all that important. You want to use shoe trees - use shoe trees. biggrin.gif

These trees were not necessarily custom made to fit my shoes but does illustrate the benefit of well-fitting trees.
Of course lacquered trees dont absorb moisture, which shouldn't be an issue unless you get caught in the rain for a long period or mistreat your shoes. Knowing how to properly dry ones shoes is par for the course.
The heels aren't overstretched. Look again.
Yes, I love posting pics of my shoes, thanks for giving me the opportunity.
post #105 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post

Quote:
You want to use shoe trees - use shoe trees. biggrin.gif

Thank you, whomever you are for making SF a better place by giving us all your permission to use shoetrees.
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