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Are Shoe Trees Important - Page 6

post #76 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post


Go instead for ones that are solid. The greater the surface area of the shoe in contact with the shoe tree, the better (faster drying).

Very interesting experiment! THANKS~!smile.gif
post #77 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NaTionS View Post

Just came across this thread. Any recommendations for decent cheap shoetrees?


Joes A Bank  on sale: Buy one get 2 free. 3 pair for $25.

post #78 of 115
Many problems with this experiment.

No blinding. Not even single blinding. Small number in sample. Is a pair of shoes N=1 or N=2?

The shoes may have had different levels of lanolin in each shoe this either increasing or decreasing the shoes ability to take up, absorb, water.

Did you weigh each shoe to determine if each shoe had taken up the same amount of water and had returned to the same weight afterwards in the same time? What was the Instrument used to measure time to dry?

Was the shoe tree weighed before and after to determine if it had actually taken up any, some or all of the water, alleged to be absorbed by the shoe leather?

The only conclusion that can be reasonably drawn from this less than optimal experiment is that shoe trees would appear to make no appreciable difference to measured sole/ toe curl in a single experiment comprised of dipping second hand shoes in water.

Certainly not acceptable in any refereed journal on mens clothing or footwear that I edit.
post #79 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Many problems with this experiment.
No blinding. Not even single blinding. Small number in sample. Is a pair of shoes N=1 or N=2?
The shoes may have had different levels of lanolin in each shoe this either increasing or decreasing the shoes ability to take up, absorb, water.
Did you weigh each shoe to determine if each shoe had taken up the same amount of water and had returned to the same weight afterwards in the same time? What was the Instrument used to measure time to dry?
Was the shoe tree weighed before and after to determine if it had actually taken up any, some or all of the water, alleged to be absorbed by the shoe leather?
The only conclusion that can be reasonably drawn from this less than optimal experiment is that shoe trees would appear to make no appreciable difference to measured sole/ toe curl in a single experiment comprised of dipping second hand shoes in water.
Certainly not acceptable in any refereed journal on mens clothing or footwear that I edit.

facepalm.gif
post #80 of 115
So according to a couple of high-end shoe makers here in NY - don't use them unless they are built to the correct last - their argument being that they will stretch your shoes out in funny ways in they aren't shaped correctly.

They suggested stuffing them with socks or something to preserve the shape but be somewhat shape conforming...
post #81 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NaTionS View Post

Just came across this thread. Any recommendations for decent cheap shoetrees?

There was once a member named Vox who gave the most absurd answer to this question. Though it was frightfully appaling to many it was also deliciously hilarious. I dare not repeat it.
post #82 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Many problems with this experiment.
No blinding. Not even single blinding. Small number in sample. Is a pair of shoes N=1 or N=2?
The shoes may have had different levels of lanolin in each shoe this either increasing or decreasing the shoes ability to take up, absorb, water.
Did you weigh each shoe to determine if each shoe had taken up the same amount of water and had returned to the same weight afterwards in the same time? What was the Instrument used to measure time to dry?
Was the shoe tree weighed before and after to determine if it had actually taken up any, some or all of the water, alleged to be absorbed by the shoe leather?
The only conclusion that can be reasonably drawn from this less than optimal experiment is that shoe trees would appear to make no appreciable difference to measured sole/ toe curl in a single experiment comprised of dipping second hand shoes in water.
Certainly not acceptable in any refereed journal on mens clothing or footwear that I edit.

I'll bet you get invited to all the New Year's Eve parties, right?
post #83 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post

I managed to get a couple of pairs of shoe trees in spite of my deepest convictions otherwise.

Of the things to have a deep conviction... shoetrees!

Hell yeah!
post #84 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

There was once a member named Vox who gave the most absurd answer to this question. Though it was frightfully appaling to many it was also deliciously hilarious. I dare not repeat it.

Senior member Ferdinand Corbera has duggen it up. I believe the term used was ""turducken" trees" which appears in this very thread.
post #85 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post

So according to a couple of high-end shoe makers here in NY - don't use them unless they are built to the correct last - their argument being that they will stretch your shoes out in funny ways in they aren't shaped correctly.
They suggested stuffing them with socks or something to preserve the shape but be somewhat shape conforming...


I agree with this, it makes perfect sense.

 

I personally never had problems with too much moisture or the shoes "collapsing" from just sitting on the shoe rack (I have a cheap pair of Dockers bought 6-7 years ago and they still look just fine), but if I had to use anything I would simply stuff the shoes with newspaper. Much greater and faster moisture absorbance than a piece of wood and will add uniform pressure throughout the shoe.

post #86 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post



I agree with this, it makes perfect sense.

I personally never had problems with too much moisture or the shoes "collapsing" from just sitting on the shoe rack (I have a cheap pair of Dockers bought 6-7 years ago and they still look just fine), but if I had to use anything I would simply stuff the shoes with newspaper. Much greater and faster moisture absorbance than a piece of wood and will add uniform pressure throughout the shoe.

WHY DO YOU HATE SHOE TREES SO MUCH?????
post #87 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORE View Post


WHY DO YOU HATE SHOE TREES SO MUCH?????


lol, I don't really hate shoe trees. The day I start having strong feelings toward something like shoe trees would be the day I commit myself.

 

I just think they fail to deliver what some people claim:

1. Unless they are made from balsa wood, moisture absorption would be very minimal and slow.

2. Unless they were custom made to fit your shoe precisely - I don't see how they would help retain the original shape of the shoe. They should look like this:

ae-home-virtualfitguide.jpg

post #88 of 115

Newspaper will stretch your shoes in the long run, so beware.

post #89 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlrus View Post

I personally never had problems with too much moisture or the shoes "collapsing" from just sitting on the shoe rack (I have a cheap pair of Dockers bought 6-7 years ago and they still look just fine)
You wear Dockers, therefore your opinion is null and void.
post #90 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post

So according to a couple of high-end shoe makers here in NY - don't use them unless they are built to the correct last - their argument being that they will stretch your shoes out in funny ways in they aren't shaped correctly.
They suggested stuffing them with socks or something to preserve the shape but be somewhat shape conforming...

Who are the high end makers?!??!! NAMES!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post

You wear Dockers, therefore your opinion is null and void.

+100
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