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Are Shoe Trees Important - Page 5

post #61 of 115
Quote:
Are Shoe Trees Important

Only if your shoes are. wink.gif
post #62 of 115
Since getting (properly sized) woodlore epics, I have not given second thought to shoe tree searching.
post #63 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred49 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post

Thanks guys. Your replies are most appreciated. I must say, it is rather exciting to get a reply to your thread. Just a few more questions; How significant is the curling and does it justify having a shoe tree? More specifically have you found this to be true yourself?  Your arguments are compelling but, are they founded?  In this case the argument in support of shoe trees seems to have a logical basis but has anyone ever tested it out? I'm just trying to stop myself from buying something because of mob psychology. 


You make for to have funny joke on SF boys eh?

lol8[1].gif
post #64 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiego View Post

Since getting (properly sized) woodlore epics, I have not given second thought to shoe tree searching.

amateurish
post #65 of 115
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Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

amateurish

uninspired
post #66 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiego View Post

uninspired

insipid
post #67 of 115
Thread Starter 

IMG_0203.JPGIMG_0204.JPGIMG_0208.JPG
 
 Here are the pictures of the shoes. They are Italian made Carlo Rossi Shoes found in a thrift shop. Couldn't get meaningful Google results of the brand. The leather sole seems very good and seems to have fared better than the rubber used for the heel (although they don't seem to show a lot of use overall). Although I wanted a 'well made' pair of shoes to further the notion that well made shoes should not need shoe trees-I am really not sure how well made these are. The toe end has a metal plate engraved Carlo Rossi. The lining is what seems to be pig leather for the back half and a fabric lining for the front half. The inner sole is also lined with pig skin leather. As pertains the construction I have no idea. I cannot see any stitching from the inside due to the lining and nothing on the sole, although the sole looks like it is a double leather sole. The leather uppers are soft, possibly calf skin leather and I believe they were never polished or treated (they still look quite raw). In the third picture, I have shown the shoes immersed in about an inch of water. The shoes have been soaking in water for an hour and now appear as shown below. Can't say there is appreciable change to the sole as yet. The water had slightly turned brown. I'm not sure if it's dirt or dye! Will probably appreciate what it is after the shoes dry. It almost appears as though the sole hardly absorbed water but it probably did. The water has also risen up to the uppers. Unsatisfied, I went on to put some water inside the shoe and left it there for some time. Now we wait. I used the shoe that showed the greatest curvature to the sole already as the 'shoe tree free' shoe as it was easier to measure the distance from the surface on which the shoe rested to the bottom of the sole (10mm). At the conclusion of the experiment-if shoe trees are necessary, I expect to see a more curvature in the shoe tree free shoe's sole (greater than 10mm) and possibly some other signs eg deformed uppers (currently uppers are soaking wet). The shoes are now drying in a airy space. Update up as soon as something happens.lurker[1].gif



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post #68 of 115
Thread Starter 

Update #1

Woke up to realise that there was already a difference between the shoes. The one with the shoe tree is less wet than the one without. Additionally the leather on the uppers of the one with a shoe tree looks more taut and less wrinkled while that of the one without the shoe tree looks rather deformed as shown in the pictures. No curling of the sole as yet.IMG_0226[1].JPGIMG_0227[1].JPGIMG_0228[1].JPG

N
ote how the shoe without the shoe tree is darker than the one with the shoe tree. That is due to the fact that it is more wet than the other shoe. So far I can certainly say that shoe trees absorb moisture. More updates to follow.

post #69 of 115
Just came across this thread. Any recommendations for decent cheap shoetrees?
post #70 of 115
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Originally Posted by NaTionS View Post

Just came across this thread.

You have my deepest condolences.
post #71 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by NaTionS View Post

Just came across this thread. Any recommendations for decent cheap shoetrees?

you can get fine wooden shoe trees at a good price from nordstrom rack or allen edmonds stores/website.
post #72 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

You have my deepest condolences.

Haha I didn't actually read anything in this thread, just caught my eye when I was on the forum homepage and this was the most recently updated thread in MC so I popped in to ask my question. I guessing this thread had a lot of baldy[1].gifbaldy[1].gif?
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

you can get fine wooden shoe trees at a good price from nordstrom rack or allen edmonds stores/website.

Thanks, looks like AE happens to have a sale on shoe trees atm. Grabbed 2 pairs.
post #73 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

You have my deepest condolences.

so are we starting a business venture together or not?
post #74 of 115
Been using 100yen plastic Daiso shoe trees exclusively for a year. On my Sutor Mans and Cheaney Sigs. Serves me just just fine. No need for expensive trees. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #75 of 115
Thread Starter 

The experiment is now over. There was no significant curvature to the soles which are now both fully dry. The shoe with the shoe tree dried up much faster than the one without. A few interesting points/recommendations; The areas that dried up fastest were those in direct contact with the shoe tree. I would recommend full wooden shoe trees with a heel end. I would not recommend those with carved out soles like this IMG_0231[1].JPG

G
o instead for ones that are solid. The greater the surface area of the shoe in contact with the shoe tree, the better (faster drying). And off course, the shoe that had the shoe tree has a much better shape than the one that didn't. Even if it doesn't stay in shape after wearing, I would avowedly say, its much better than having a squashed up looking shoe. So that ends it....So if anyone ever asks.... (Not that any of you ever doubted it)...'Are shoe trees important?' -Hell yea they are! I thank you for all you contributions and all the humour- I was constantly in stitches each time someone posted something new! Gotta love SFicon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

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