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Are Shoe Trees Important - Page 3

post #31 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by kasakka View Post

Oh and the reason why shoe trees look like they do is:
  1. They don't need to look like real feet. They're meant to fit the inside of the shoe, which is not exactly like your feet unless you're into that nasty Chinese foot binding thing.
  2. They don't have socks because the wood is enough to wick moisture away. If they had socks you'd need to change them from time to time whereas the wood will dry on its own better. Plus the cedar wood gives a nice scent.

600
post #32 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

It seems to me that the perfect way to store clothes and shoes would be to have multitude of mannequins...
billrb.jpg
...exactly in one's size and dimensions. So, you know, you take off your clothes and shoes, and put them on the mannequin, on which they retain perfect shape.
Someone unfamiliar with Qin Shi Huang will probably say something like, "Oh, that would take too much terracotta, blah blah blah," but it can be done. Failing that, if space is a factor, why not just the feet? For such feet would be smaller in outline than the shoes, and so, take up no more space.
confused.gif

srs, we will make a lot of money together.
post #33 of 115

Do you need shoe trees for every pair of shoes? I've heard shoes are fine after about a day of tree lovin', so rotating one or two trees is fine. Truth or fiction?  And is there anything wrong with the cheap Jos. A Bank trees that go on sale 3 for $25 from time to time?

post #34 of 115
I think you don't want trees to be shaped quite like feet.

A shoe tree usually puts pressure on the shoe and forces it back into shape...when you wear the shoe, it will start to bend funny where it doesn't fit your foot perfectly and the tree will help push it back into the shape of the last.

Even with a bespoke last built based on your foot, you would want to fill the parts of the shoe that are extended past your own foot (such as in the toe box)

to the OP: in the time it took you to write that post, you could have applied for a part time job and worked enough hours to pay for a pair of $12 shoe trees at nordstrom rack.
post #35 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post

Otherwise I believe if you have a pair of MTO John Lobbs, your shoes will look good after 10 years even without shoe trees because 1) You don't wear them often 2) They have the best leather for uppers and sole 3) You give them a good polish and conditioning every now and then 4) When you wear them you do not walk for miles and miles in them.5) You change your gait ever so slightly to ensure you don't wear them out too quickly (and a few other points I can't think of right now) but lo and behold..

i don't believe that your assumption is correct.
post #36 of 115
@otc laugh.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLjon View Post

Do you need shoe trees for every pair of shoes? I've heard shoes are fine after about a day of tree lovin', so rotating one or two trees is fine. Truth or fiction?  And is there anything wrong with the cheap Jos. A Bank trees that go on sale 3 for $25 from time to time?

personally i make sure to have a pair of shoe trees for every pair of shoes. any wooden tree should be fine.

i really dont understand this whole thing though. shoe trees are so cheap i dont know why a person wouldnt just get em confused.gif
post #37 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

@otc laugh.gif
personally i make sure to have a pair of shoe trees for every pair of shoes. any wooden tree should be fine.
i really dont understand this whole thing though. shoe trees are so cheap i dont know why a person wouldnt just get em confused.gif

Yeah, I get a pair of shoe trees every time I buy a pair of shoes. All my shoes are stored with trees.
post #38 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post

Yeah, I get a pair of shoe trees every time I buy a pair of shoes. All my shoes are stored with trees.

I think I am a pair short right now...but I try to keep it 1:1 since the ones from the rack (or the ones costco used to sell) are so cheap.

Doesn't mean you have to buy a new one every time you buy shoes (so except for fancy lasted ones, it doesn't make sense for them to come with shoes). They don't wear out or anything so when you retire or sell a pair of shoes, you just move the trees on to your next purchase.

If they lose that cedar scent, just take some fine sandpaper to them for 30 seconds and they are good as new.
post #39 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Why do trees look like this... Whimsy (Click to show)
tumblr_lowvq1GYBF1qfbdo0o1_400.jpg
...instead of this...
foot8lg.jpg
...with a fabric layer like this...
organic____1179_medium.jpg
...so that a shoe "tree" would look like this?
copper-socks-mens-dress-casual.jpg
?

I'm getting a pretty strong visual of your belt rack.


198

Of course, given a man's individual taste, YBMV.
post #40 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post

Thanks guys. Your replies are most appreciated. I must say, it is rather exciting to get a reply to your thread. Just a few more questions; How significant is the curling and does it justify having a shoe tree? More specifically have you found this to be true yourself?  Your arguments are compelling but, are they founded?  In this case the argument in support of shoe trees seems to have a logical basis but has anyone ever tested it out? I'm just trying to stop myself from buying something because of mob psychology. 


You make for to have funny joke on SF boys eh?
post #41 of 115


They aren't always cheap... Carmina shoe trees are €60, but I guess it's worth it since they fit so well inside the shoes. If you can afford it, you should get lasted trees. It doesn't make much sense to buy €350+ shoes and stuff cheap generic trees inside, unless of course they happen to fit neatly... otherwise you could even ruin the shoes...

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

@otc laugh.gif
personally i make sure to have a pair of shoe trees for every pair of shoes. any wooden tree should be fine.
i really dont understand this whole thing though. shoe trees are so cheap i dont know why a person wouldnt just get em confused.gif


 

post #42 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDiaz View Post



They aren't always cheap... Carmina shoe trees are €60, but I guess it's worth it since they fit so well inside the shoes. If you can afford it, you should get lasted trees. It doesn't make much sense to buy €350+ shoes and stuff cheap generic trees inside, unless of course they happen to fit neatly... otherwise you could even ruin the shoes...

Quote:



AFAIK, Carmina's shoe trees are not lasted, which makes them a poor value at €60 IMO.
post #43 of 115
Thread Starter 

+1

post #44 of 115
Thread Starter 

I managed to get a couple of pairs of shoe trees in spite of my deepest convictions otherwise. They all managed to fit quite snugly into my shoes with the exception of one. Even though I bought different types (all cedar though) They couldn't quite fit into my Magnannis. The toe end seemed to be under high stress as it has quite a slim profile compared to my other shoes. I completely agree with apropos and RDiaz, cheap generic shoe trees do more harm than good. 


magnanni benito.jpg
 

As I drove home it suddenly struck me! Why don't I get a well made leather shoe from the thrift shop and conduct a little experiment? Inspired by Gdot and others,I thought I would conduct an experiment wherein I immerse leather soled shoes in water for half an hour or more. Following this, I would tissue dry excess water from both shoes, place a shoe tree in one and leave the other without. I found an Italian made shoe with quite a bit of wear left in it. Soft leather uppers and a more than ample amount of the original sole in place and intact. I don't have the shoe with me now but the name did not ring any bells. The experiment will end either when the sole of the un-treed shoe curls appreciably or the soles completely dry out-which ever comes first. To make everything standard, I will measure the distance from the toe end to the surface on which the shoe will rest in  millimetres when the sole is wet/ when is has dried out. I am considering drying them outside away from the sun to speed up the process of drying. Any qualms or shortcomings in the little experiment? Will post pictures up shortly. If there is not difference between the two shoes; I win and I get an extra pair of weekend shoes. If I'm wrong I will be a greater advocate for shoe trees than the world has ever seen
 

post #45 of 115
How much are C&J 337 last shoe trees? Is there a significant benefit in using lasted shoe trees?
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